Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I has a simple JavaScript code which is consuming memory while running infinitely. Memory consumption is monitored by Google Chrome internal memory profiler.

  setInterval(function(){
     var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
     xhr.open('GET', 'json.txt', true);
     xhr.onreadystatechange = function() {
        if(this.readyState == 4 && this.status == 200) {
           console.log(this.responseText);
        }
     };
     xhr.send('');
  }, 500);

Html file with above code sample and json.txt is hosted on on my local server, getting a file isn't taking more than 500ms (it is always about 7-10ms).

In a long time run the memory graph is looks like that Initial memory consumption graph

EDIT The same Chrome window after a hour of work Graph after a hour of work

EDIT On the long run (hours) not all memory is reclaimed an graph is still ascending. I understand why the memory is consumed, i didn't understand why it is not fully reclaimed.

EDIT This is how i can reduce memory leak

  var callback = function(){
      if(this.readyState == 4 && this.status == 200) {
          console.log(this.responseText);
      }
  } 

  setInterval(function(){
     var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
     xhr.open('GET', 'json.txt', true);
     xhr.onreadystatechange = callback;
     xhr.send('');
  }, 500);

This improvement allowing not to link callback's closure to xhr var.

share|improve this question
    
were you able to fix your leak with the accepted answer? –  brainjam Apr 25 '11 at 0:57
    
@brainjam, the accpeted answer gives me the clue, how this code can be improved. See my edit. –  Olegas Apr 25 '11 at 10:11
    
my brain hurts. I guess your original construction was creating a circular reference between the anonymous function and the closure. This is a very good example of a very subtle (to me anyways) memory leak pattern. Thanks for persisting until you got a good answer. –  brainjam Apr 25 '11 at 12:26
add comment

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted
+50

I imagine this interval isn't being set in a vacuum. The the function you're passing into setInterval may have access to the lexical scope it was defined in. This means every variable around it will always be reachable in the garbage collector's eyes, even if you're not using those variables within the function. The garbage collector will never clean it up. It might be better to define the function in a more sanitary environment where it wont have closure access to any variables large in size.

EDIT: Sorry, I'll try to make myself more clear. This has nothing to do with the XHR - you could put anything (or even nothing) in that setInterval function and it would still leak if there's some variables in its lexical scope that you would want cleaned up. You just need to make sure the setInterval function doesn't have closure access to any variables you want cleaned up. For example:

(function() {
  var a = readFile('a-very-big-file.txt');

  setInterval(function() {
    console.log('im leaking!');
  }, 500);
})();

That will leak. Even though the setInterval doesn't do anything particularly meaningful, it still has access to "a", and the garbage collector sees it as reachable.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, the function which is in setInterval is having access to at least global window object. But it is declared once and must not to infinite consume memory. Well, each time the function is called, new XHR object is created (let's name it A) and new function (B) are set to one of it's properties. Now fn B seeing object A. But these object are NOT reacheable from any other scope and thus must be garbage collected as far as i understand GC's work. –  Olegas Apr 20 '11 at 5:47
    
This must not "incrementally" leak. No new objects created in loop here. –  Olegas Apr 21 '11 at 13:10
add comment

For one you repeatedly load the content of json.txt, which will need some memory. Apart from that the XHR itself might need some memory as well. I don't see it as much of a problem, however, since the memory seems to get reclaimed anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
On a long run i can see on the graph, what not all memory is reclaimed. –  Olegas Apr 14 '11 at 7:36
    
Edited my question. Added another graph of the same Chrome window after a hour of work. –  Olegas Apr 14 '11 at 7:45
add comment

Why shouldn't it? At least var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest(); must consume memory on each iteration and collected by GC (probably, it's seen on your chart).

share|improve this answer
    
Added another chart. It can be seen there what not all memory is reclaimed. –  Olegas Apr 14 '11 at 7:59
add comment

If the request-response cycle takes longer than the specified interval there certainly will be some memory overhead.

Since memory will be freed only after a request has completed(Success or Error).

share|improve this answer
add comment

The memory is not being fully reclaimed most likely due to the use of console.log. I assume that under the hood, console will add things to the internal array, or maybe a string, and since you are adding large chunks of data to it, and never remove from it, GC will never clean it up, while the application is running. Try commenting out that statement and see if it changes memory usage. Memory that is used for creating XMLHttpRequest is eventually freed by GC, since the reference to it will become orphaned after the request is complete, but console is a global variable, that still stays in the scope while the page is available.

share|improve this answer
    
No, this is not the reason. I've deleted console.log(...) statement and it still consuming memory. In half of an hour memory consumed by Google Chrome tab (according to about:memory, Private memory parameter) is ascending from 6288Kb to 22304Kb –  Olegas Apr 19 '11 at 8:07
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.