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#include <exception>
#include <iostream>
#include <cstdio>

using namespace std;

class BaseException : exception {
public:
    BaseException(const char* message) : message(message) {}
    const char* getMessage() {
        return message;
    }
private:
    const char* message;
};

void wrong() {
    unsigned short int argumentCallCounter = 1;

    /// @todo check why commented below does not work ?!
    // char tmp[13 + sizeof(argumentCallCounter)];

    /// @todo but this works
    char* tmp = new char[13 + sizeof(argumentCallCounter)];
    sprintf(tmp, "No %u argument", argumentCallCounter);

    throw BaseException(tmp);
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    try {
        wrong();
    } catch (BaseException e) {
        cout << e.getMessage() << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

The code above works, but in comments, there is a code segment, that does not work.
char tmp[13 + sizeof(argumentCallCounter)];
I understand that it does not work because when the program leaves function wrong the variable tmp no longer exists.
Can anybody help with this?

And also that decision that I write:
char* tmp = new char[13 + sizeof(argumentCallCounter)];
It's no good either, because when the program is complete, there is a memory leak, because nobody deletes tmp

share|improve this question
    
what exactly do u mean by "not works"? –  Vijay Apr 14 '11 at 7:11
    
You do realise that std::exception already contains a message string? Also, sizeof(argumentCallCounter) will be the number of bytes in an unsigned short (probably 2), and not the number of decimal digits, so your buffer will overflow if the value is 100 or more. Usually, you're best off using std::string rather than manually allocated character buffers in all but the most speed-critical code. –  Mike Seymour Apr 14 '11 at 7:19
    
@Mike - std::exception only contains a string in the Microsoft version (implementation detail). You could derive from one of the other standard exceptions from <stdexcept> though. –  Bo Persson Apr 14 '11 at 7:42
    
@Bo: Sorry, I was confusing std::exception with the standard exception types derived from it. In any event, I'd definitely handle the string as a std::string. –  Mike Seymour Apr 14 '11 at 8:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
//why commented below is not works
char tmp[13 + sizeof(argumentCallCounter)];

It would not work because tmp is local to the function, and it not more exists once you exit from the function, but you're still trying to access it from main().

I would suggest you to use std::string in BaseException and everywhere else.

I would also suggest you to catch the exception by const reference as:

catch (const BaseException & e)
//     ^^^^^ note          ^ note

EDIT:

Implement BaseException as follows:

class BaseException : std::exception 
{
public:
    BaseException(std::string msg) : message(msg) {}

    //override std::exception::what() virtual function
    virtual const char* what() const throw()
    {
        return message.c_str();
    }

private:
    std::string message;
};

Use it as:

 try
 { 
    //some code that might throw BaseException
 }
 catch (const BaseException & e)
 {
       cout << "exception message : " << e.what() << endl;
 }

EDIT:

And implement wrong() as

void wrong() {
    unsigned short int argumentCallCounter = 1;

    std::stringstream ss;
    ss << "No " << argumentCallCounter << " argument";

    throw BaseException(tmp.str());
}
share|improve this answer
    
This not works, error: passing ‘const BaseException’ as ‘this’ argument of ‘const char* BaseException::getMessage()’ discards qualifiers –  azat Apr 14 '11 at 8:40
    
@azat: I think you didn't implement as I suggested. Anyway see the EDIT in my answer. I've explained how BaseException should be implemented and how it should be used! –  Nawaz Apr 14 '11 at 9:09
    
@Nawaz, And throw I must like this throw new BaseException() or like this throw BaseException() ? –  azat Apr 14 '11 at 9:22
    
@azat: use this : throw BaseException(tmp.str()); as shown in the second EDIT. :D –  Nawaz Apr 14 '11 at 9:37
    
And I want to describe which exception function can throws? void wrong() throw(BaseException) ? –  azat Apr 14 '11 at 9:47

I am usually throwing a std::runtime_exception initialized with a std::string.

share|improve this answer
    
How can I generate string? I must concat an integer value there, that's why I using char* –  azat Apr 14 '11 at 7:45
    
std::string has a constructor that takes a char*. So you can still construct the message as you do now, and then cast it to std::string. (Do fix the memory leak, though.) –  MSalters Apr 14 '11 at 8:42
    
@azat: you can construct a string by employing an ostringstream, as shown in the answer below. –  ssegvic Apr 14 '11 at 11:41
    
thanks ^) But I don`t like way using streams. I already write this code segment using sprintf! –  azat Apr 14 '11 at 14:01
    
@azat: frankly, I do not think that "liking" should be relevant in choosing one programming solution instead of another. In particular, with sprintf you must think hard about the size of the receiving buffer (why 13 and not 14?). Additionally, sometimes we are unable to make a safe prediction of the required size. Hence the advantage of an ostringstream. Hope this helps! –  ssegvic Apr 15 '11 at 11:09

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/iostream/stringstream/ http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/std/stdexcept/runtime_error/

void wrong() {
    unsigned short int argumentCallCounter = 1;

    std::stringstream ss;
    ss << "No " << argumentCallCounter << " argument";

    throw std::runtime_error(ss.str());
}
share|improve this answer

What do you mean by “not works”?

The BaseException should copy the string it gets from the constructor, and make a local copy of it. Then, the wrong function can deallocate it in any case.

And when you do that, the local tmp array should work again.

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