Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm implementing a very basic API to have a better control over ServerSocket and Sockets, but I'm in a very weird problem that I cannot fix due to my lack of threads knowledge. Let me explain it.

In my class SocketStreamReceiver I use a secondary thread to listen for new sockets with ServerSocket#accept(). There are 2 methods: start() and stop() that the client can use to start (creating a thread and begin listening with accept()) and stop (closing the ServerSocket and destroying the thread) my SocketStreamReceiver.

How will you implement stop() method? Keep in mind that stop() can be called inside doSomething(), in the same secondary thread started by start(). You can change anything you want: you can create the ServerSocket inside the thread if you want, just before while(running).

public class SocketStreamReceiver{
    ...
    private Thread thread;
    private ServerSocket server;
    private boolean running;
    ...

    public void start () throws IOException{
        if (thread != null) return;

        server = new ServerSocket (port);
        thread = new Thread (new Runnable (){
            @Override
            public void run (){
                try{
                    while (running){
                        Socket socket = server.accept ();
                        doSomething (socket);
                    }
                }catch (SocketException e){
                    ...
                }catch (IOException e){
                    ...
                }
            }
        }, "SocketStreamReceiver");
        thread.start ();
    }

    public void stop () throws IOException{
        if (thread == null) return;

        //code...

        thread = null;
    }
}

Thanks.

EDIT - Solution:

public class SocketStreamReceiver{
    private Thread thread;
    private ServerSocket server;
    private volatile boolean running;
    ...

    public synchronized void start () throws IOException{
        if (thread != null) throw new IllegalStateException ("The receiver is already started.");

        server = new ServerSocket (port);
        thread = new Thread (new Runnable (){
            @Override
            public void run (){
                try{
                    running = true;
                    while (running){
                        doSomething (server.accept ());
                        ...
                    }
                }catch (SocketException e){
                    ...
                }catch (IOException e){
                    ...
                }
            }
        }, "SocketStreamReceiver");
        thread.start ();
    }

    public synchronized void stop (){
        if (thread == null) return;

        running = false;
        try{
            if (server != null){
                server.close ();
            }
        }catch (IOException e){}

        thread = null;
    }
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would just do

public void stop() {
    running = false;
    try{
        if (server != null) server.close ();
    } catch (IOException ignored){
    }
}

It doesn't appear you even need the running flag. However I would use it in your server accept code to determine if an Exception is expected or not. i.e. when running == false ignore all exceptions.

I would make running volatile.

I would make start()/stop() synchronized if you can run these from different threads.

share|improve this answer
1  
If server.close() is called and after we do server.accept() what will happen? Does ServerSocket block the thread? –  Gabriel Llamas Apr 14 '11 at 8:43
1  
The accept() will throw a SocketException, which you have to catch anyway. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 14 '11 at 8:51
1  
Why do you catch the exception AND throws it? –  MByD Apr 14 '11 at 8:59
    
@MByD, because I forgot to remove it. Thank you. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 14 '11 at 9:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.