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#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <netdb.h> 

void error(const char *msg) {
    perror(msg);
    exit(0);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    int sockfd, portno, n;
    struct sockaddr_in serv_addr;
    struct hostent *server;

    char buffer[256];
    if (argc < 3) {
        fprintf(stderr, "usage %s hostname port\n", argv[0]);
        exit(0);
    }
    portno = atoi(argv[2]);
    sockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
    if (sockfd < 0)
        error("ERROR opening socket");
    server = gethostbyname(argv[1]);
    if (server == NULL) {
        fprintf(stderr, "ERROR, no such host\n");
        exit(0);
    }
    bzero((char *) &serv_addr, sizeof (serv_addr));
    serv_addr.sin_family = AF_INET;
    bcopy((char *) server->h_addr,
            (char *) &serv_addr.sin_addr.s_addr,
            server->h_length);
    serv_addr.sin_port = htons(portno);

    if (connect(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *) &serv_addr, sizeof (serv_addr)) < 0) error("ERROR connecting");

    while (1) {
        printf("Please enter the message: ");
        bzero(buffer, 256);
        fgets(buffer, 255, stdin);
        // n = write(sockfd, buffer, strlen(buffer));
        n = send(sockfd, buffer, strlen(buffer), 0);
        if (n < 0) error("ERROR writing to socket");

        bzero(buffer, 256);
        // n = read(sockfd, buffer, 255);
        n = recv(sockfd, buffer, 255, 0);
        if (n < 0) error("ERROR reading from socket");

        printf("%s\n", buffer);
    }
    close(sockfd);

    return 0;
}

I have the flowing code, it works fine only at first iteration.
At second iteration it wait, wait & wait in recv or read

Can anybody help with this?

Upd, here is a server code (not that I using, but the same principles):
And it works like I wrote before too!

/* A simple server in the internet domain using TCP
   The port number is passed as an argument */
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/types.h> 
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>

void error(const char *msg) {
    perror(msg);
    exit(1);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    int sockfd, newsockfd, portno;
    socklen_t clilen;
    char buffer[256];
    struct sockaddr_in serv_addr, cli_addr;
    int n;
    if (argc < 2) {
        fprintf(stderr, "ERROR, no port provided\n");
        exit(1);
    }
    sockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
    if (sockfd < 0)
        error("ERROR opening socket");
    memset((char*) &serv_addr, 0, sizeof(serv_addr));
    portno = atoi(argv[1]);
    serv_addr.sin_family = AF_INET;
    serv_addr.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY;
    serv_addr.sin_port = htons(portno);
    if (bind(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *) &serv_addr,
            sizeof (serv_addr)) < 0)
        error("ERROR on binding");
    listen(sockfd, 5);
    clilen = sizeof (cli_addr);
    while (1) {
        newsockfd = accept(sockfd,
                (struct sockaddr *) &cli_addr,
                &clilen);
        if (newsockfd < 0)
            error("ERROR on accept");
        memset(buffer, 0, sizeof(buffer));
        n = read(newsockfd, buffer, 255);
        if (n < 0) error("ERROR reading from socket");
        printf("Here is the message: %s\n", buffer);
        n = write(newsockfd, "I got your message", 18);
        if (n < 0) error("ERROR writing to socket");
    }
    close(newsockfd);
    close(sockfd);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Has the server actually sent you back some information to read? It looks like you're using blocking io, so recv isn't going to return until it's read the data. –  forsvarir Apr 14 '11 at 8:21
2  
Don't use bzero, it's non-portable and the standard memset suffices. –  larsmans Apr 14 '11 at 8:22
    
@forsvarir yes, the server actially sent information back. If run this program first, in first iteration all ok, in second not. If run program second time, than at first iteration all ok too, bit in second not! –  azat Apr 14 '11 at 8:27
2  
memset(buffer,0,sizeof(buffer)); –  forsvarir Apr 14 '11 at 8:32
1  
What does the server do? –  forsvarir Apr 14 '11 at 8:46
show 6 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You while loop (in the server code) is in the wrong place... it should be around this bit:

        memset(buffer, 0, sizeof(buffer));
        n = read(newsockfd, buffer, 255);
        if (n < 0) error("ERROR reading from socket");
        printf("Here is the message: %s\n", buffer);
        n = write(newsockfd, "I got your message", 18);
        if (n < 0) error("ERROR writing to socket");

As it stands, each iteration you're accepting a new connection, then listening for a read on it. The client on the other hand isn't establishing a new connection, it's writing to the existing socket.

Either, you client needs to close the connection + reconnect each time, or the server needs to allow multiple read/writes for the communication.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! But i Think that I already try this... hmm... –  azat Apr 14 '11 at 9:05
    
You have, or you haven't? :) –  forsvarir Apr 14 '11 at 9:13
    
@azat: for the record... I've just tried it.. and it worked fine for me... –  forsvarir Apr 14 '11 at 9:16
    
Yeah, it works for me too! Thanks! It not works when I try, because there is another error :) –  azat Apr 14 '11 at 9:20
    
@azat: super... enjoy the next problem :) –  forsvarir Apr 14 '11 at 9:21
add comment

This is one of those things with sockets I don't truly understand, but IF you do it like this, it should work. At least for me it does.

while(recv(sockfd, buffer, 255, 0) > 0) {
    ...
}

If anyone knows why this work, please leave me a comment below :)

share|improve this answer
    
I think that more in this case is depends on server.. –  azat Apr 14 '11 at 8:59
    
You haven't changed anything? :) recv returns 0, or <0 if nothings read, or there's an error condition... I believe the problem's server side... You change is unlikely to fix the problem. In fact, it'll probably make it worse, depending if you're changing the existing while condition, since the server doesn't echo until after the message has been sent. –  forsvarir Apr 14 '11 at 8:59
    
I wouldn't change the existing while condition. But I have used this before where calling read/recv once might freeze if it has not yet received anything on the socket before the function call, but by using this version it will run again and again until it does receive the answer. Of course the programmer should make sure it does not stay in this loop forever if it does not receive anything. –  ephrack Apr 14 '11 at 9:04
    
Unless you've set the socket up for non-blocking io, the first call to recv will block until it has received a chunk of data (it doesn't need to be in a while loop). You might use a while loop if say you wanted to keep calling recv until an entire message (according to some defined protocol / or size had been read), before processing the message afterwards. –  forsvarir Apr 14 '11 at 9:10
    
That makes sense, thanks :) –  ephrack Apr 14 '11 at 9:18
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