Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to solve a problem where I have some classes in which I need to do some common work and then a bunch of problem specific work and when this is finished do some more processing common to all these classes.

I have a Base and Derived class that both have a function called Execute. When I call the derived version of this function, I'd like to be able to do some processing common to all my derived classes in the Base and then continue executing in my Derived::Execute and going back to Base::Execute to finish off with some common work.

Is this possible in C++ and how would one best go about doing that?

This is the idea, however it's probably not very workable like this:

class Base
{
public:
   virtual void Execute();
};

Base::Execute() {
   // do some pre work
   Derived::Execute();  //Possible????
  // do some more common work...  
}


class Derived : public Base
{
public:
    void Execute();

};

void Derived::Execute()
{
   Base::Execute();
   //Do some derived specific work...
}

int main()
{

   Base * b = new Derived();

   b.Execute(); //Call derived, to call into base and back into derived then back into base

}
share|improve this question
    
Err.. that will result in a StackOverflow? –  Nim Apr 14 '11 at 9:09
    
@Nim: that's why i'm asking advice... –  Tony The Lion Apr 14 '11 at 9:12
    
sorry I couldn't resist! ;) –  Nim Apr 14 '11 at 9:16
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Use a pure virtual function from base..

class Base
{
public:
   void Execute();
private:
   virtual void _exec() = 0;
};

Base::Execute() {
   // do some common pre work
   // do derived specific work
   _exec();
  // do some more common work...  
}


class Derived : public Base
{
private:
    void _exec() {
     // do stuff 
    }
};

int main()
{

   Base * b = new Derived();

   b.Execute();

}

EDIT: changed the flow slightly after reading the question some more.. :) The above mechanism should match exactly what you require now -

i.e.

  1. Base Common Stuff
  2. Derived specific stuff
  3. Base Common stuff again
share|improve this answer
4  
And of course depending on your requirements you always have the options to (1) make _exec non-pure with for example a do-nothing implementation, if that would give a sensible result; and/or (2) make Execute virtual so that derived classes don't have to follow the pattern if they think they have a better implementation. –  Steve Jessop Apr 14 '11 at 9:36
add comment

This is called the NVI (Non-Virtual Interface, from Herb Sutter here) idiom in C++, and basically says that you should not have public virtual functions, but rather protected/private virtual functions. User code will have to call your public non-virtual function in the base class, and that will dispatch through to the protected/private virtual method.

From a design perspective the rationale is that a base class has two different interfaces, on one side the user interface, determined by the public subset of the class, and on the other end the extensibility interface or how the class can be extended. By using NVI you are decoupling both interfaces and allowing greater control in the base class.

class base {
   virtual void _foo();  // interface to extensions
public:
   void foo() {          // interface to users
      // do some ops
      _foo();
   }
};
share|improve this answer
1  
This is called the template method pattern in C++ (and in other languages). In the NVI idiom, the non virtual base class functions do not actually do anything. –  James Kanze Apr 14 '11 at 11:01
    
@James Kanze: Well, I wouldn't know, but Herb Sutter that created the NVI term in the article that I linked calls it NVI and in his example the non virtual functions do actually implement the functionality in terms of protected virtual functions. Take a quick look at the linked article. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 19 '11 at 13:23
    
@David Rodriguez I should have been more precide. The solution the original poster is looking for is the template method pattern, not NVI. Your example is NVI. The difference is that in the template method pattern, the base class does some actual work; it "pilots" the algorithm, so to speak, and only calls virtual functions for specific customizable actions. In NVI, the non-virtual public functions don't actually do anything outside of validation (pre- and post-conditions, for example). –  James Kanze Apr 19 '11 at 14:19
    
@James Kanze: Did you read the linked article? The public interface in the example that Sutter proposes is int Process( Gadget& ), and the internal virtual interface offers virtual int DoProcessPhase1( Gadget& ); and virtual int DoProcessPhase2( Gadget& );: The non virtual function is driving the algorithm and pulling specific behaviors from the derived classes. Note that NVI as presented by Sutter differs from NVI as explained in Wikipedia. Basically it is a stricter TM in that it requires virtual methods to be non-public. But these are only details :) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 19 '11 at 14:33
    
@David Yes, I read the article. I also read it when Herb first posted it. Herb did confuse this with the template method pattern when he first posted it. You might look at the "Later note" he added; he invented the name NVI because I pointed out the differences between what he was presenting and the template method pattern. He no longer calls it the template method pattern because it is different. –  James Kanze Apr 19 '11 at 15:42
show 1 more comment

Turn the problem from its head to its feet. What you actually want to have is a base class algorithm that derived classes can plug into:

class Base {
public:
  void Execute()
  {
    // do something
    execute();
    // do some more things
  }
private:
  virtual void execute() = 0;
};

class Derived : public Base {
public:
  // whatever
private:
  virtual void execute()
  {
     //do some fancy stuff
  }
};

Letting derived classes plug into base class algorithms is often called "template method" pattern (which has nothing to do with template. Having no public virtual functions in the base class interface is often called "non-virtual interface" pattern.

I'm sure google can find you a lot on those two.

share|improve this answer
    
"Having no virtual functions in the base class interface" is often called "not an interface":-). (I'm sure you meant no public virtual functions, and not no virtual functions at all.) Note that there is a difference between the template method pattern and the non-virtual interface pattern; in the template method pattern, the base class is more than just an interface. –  James Kanze Apr 19 '11 at 14:21
    
@James: I meant to reply that private functions aren't part of a class' interface, but for one, there's also protected members, and those are part of the interface for derived classes, and also, private virtual functions are overrideable by derived classes, so whether they are part of a class' interface is somewhat debatable. So I'll change my answer instead. Thanks for pointing this out. –  sbi Apr 19 '11 at 20:03
add comment

Move that Base::Execute internally in two functions and then use RAII to implement that easily.

class Base{
protected:
  void PreExecute(){ 
    // stuff before Derived::Execute
  }
  void PostExecute(){ 
    // stuff after Derived::Execute
  }

public:
  virtual void Execute() = 0;
};

struct ScopedBaseExecute{
  typedef void(Base::*base_func)();

  ScopedBaseExecute(Base* p)
    : ptr_(p)
  { ptr_->PreExecute() }

  ~ScopedBaseExecute()
  { ptr_->PostExecute(); }

  Base* ptr_;
};

class Derived : public Base{
public:
  void Execute{
    ScopedBaseExecute exec(this);
    // do whatever you want...
  }
};
share|improve this answer
    
This assuming that it makes sense to run PostExecute when "do whatever you want" throws an exception. –  Steve Jessop Apr 14 '11 at 9:44
    
@Steve: Valid point. I think in C++0x we get the current_exception function, and if you don't want something executed when an exception is thrown, you can test with that I think. Or make 2 RAII classes. –  Xeo Apr 14 '11 at 9:47
add comment

By using design pattern from this question.

David Rodriguez and sbi called it right.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.