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I got a thread which takes a db table as a paramater, I got an issue where I can't write to that db table at the same time.

1 instance of TMyThread can have a db table of 'Member' while another could have 'Staff' however there can be cases of two threads open with the same table.

Thus, I need to wrap the code in a critical section (or similar) but I don't want some dirty thing like several crical sections like (fMemberTable, fStaffTable)...

begin
    if fDBTable = 'Member' then
        fMemberTable.Enter
    else if fDbTable = 'Staff' then
    ....

We have 8 tables so that would get messy Is there some way to do

TCricalSection(fMemberTable).Enter; Or some way to do this which is easy to 'scale' and use?

One critical section around the function doesn't make sense, as I don't want to hold back other tables....

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2  
Usually databases are pretty goot at managing concurrency. What database are you using? There could be ways to manage this on the database layer, instead at the application layer. –  user160694 Apr 14 '11 at 10:24
    
Use Accuracer from Aidaim - it is ment to support this but we have found issues, have fired off an email with sample code to support. I want a backup plan incase it takes them a week to fix it. (The issue with them isn't per table, but per database. But they're ment to support it) –  Wizzard Apr 14 '11 at 12:39

2 Answers 2

You can do:

TMonitor.Enter(fMemberTable);
try
  // Do your stuff
finally TMonitor.Exit(fMemberTable);
end;

Please note this is a SPIN LOCK, not a true critical section. Very practical if you're not going to have a lot of collisions, but if threads block each other regularly, you might want to fall back to the critical section. The spin lock is, by definition, a busy-wait lock.

but I'm not sure what version of Delphi introduced this and you don't have version-specific tags.

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1  
TMonitor was introduced in Delphi 2009. –  gabr Apr 14 '11 at 9:27
    
If nothing else you can have a critical section "factory" that takes a table as input parameter and can then simulate something similar to TMonitor. –  Runner Apr 14 '11 at 9:44
    
Windows offers (since Windows 2000) a nice InitializeCriticalSectionAndSpinCount() call. It will enter a busy wait for the specified count, and if unable to enter the section in time it will then use a less expensive wait. Unluckily often Delphi tries to support still Win95, Win 3.0, DOS 1.0 and CP/M... –  user160694 Apr 14 '11 at 10:28
    
TMonitor seems to want an object, does that mean it's going to lock all tables? –  Wizzard Apr 14 '11 at 12:47
    
Your notion of TMonitor beeing a spin lock is only partially true, because a) It will only use a spin lock in multi cpu systems and b) The use of a spin lock is optional - You have to set the SpinCount of the Monitor otherwise the calling thread blocks waiting to get the Monitor. –  iamjoosy Apr 14 '11 at 12:52

You can use a Critical Section list, for example, My class defined in this unit:

interface
uses Classes, SyncObjs;

type
  { TCriticalSectionList by jachguate }
  { http://jachguate.wordpress.com }
  TCriticalSectionList = class
  private
    FCSList: TThreadList;
    FNameList: TStringList;
    function GetByName(AName: string): TCriticalSection;
  public
    constructor Create();
    destructor Destroy(); override;
    property ByName[AName: string]: TCriticalSection read GetByName; default;
  end;

  function CSList: TCriticalSectionList;

implementation
uses SysUtils;

{ TCriticalSectionList }

constructor TCriticalSectionList.Create;
begin
  inherited;
  FCSList := TThreadList.Create;
  FNameList := TStringList.Create;
end;

destructor TCriticalSectionList.Destroy;
var
  I: Integer;
  AList: TList;
begin
  AList := FCSList.LockList;
  for I := AList.Count - 1 downto 0 do
    TCriticalSection(AList[I]).Free;
  FCSList.Free;
  FNameList.Free;
  inherited;
end;


function TCriticalSectionList.GetByName(AName: string): TCriticalSection;
var
  AList: TList;
  AIdx: Integer;
begin
  AList := FCSList.LockList;
  try
    AName := UpperCase(AName);
    AIdx := FNameList.IndexOf(AName);
    if AIdx < 0 then
    begin
      FNameList.Add(AName);
      Result := TCriticalSection.Create;
      AList.Add(Result);
    end
    else
      Result := AList[AIdx];
  finally
    FCSList.UnlockList;
  end;
end;

var
  _CSList: TCriticalSectionList;

function CSList: TCriticalSectionList;
begin
  if not Assigned(_CSList) then
    _CSList := TCriticalSectionList.Create;
  Result := _CSList;
end;

initialization
  _CSList := nil;
finalization
  _CSList.Free;
end.

The class basically define a List of critical sections, accesible by "name". The first time you ask for a Critical section of a particular name that critical section is automatically created for you. You must access a single instance of this class, use the provided CSList function.

All critical sections are destroyed when the instance of the list is destroyed, for instance, the "default" instance is destroyed upon application end.

You can write code like this example:

begin
  CSList[fDBTable].Enter;
  try
    DoStuff;
  finally
    CSList[fDBTable].Leave;
  end;
end;

Enjoy.

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