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i have to sql query

SELECT child.name,(COUNT(parent.name) - (parentDepth.depth + 1)) AS depth 
from category as child,category as parent,category as sub_parent,
( select child.name,(count(parent.name)-1) as depth from category as child,category as parent where child.lft between parent.lft and parent.rgt and child.name='ELECTRONICS' ) as parentDepth 
where child.lft between parent.lft and parent.rgt and child.lft between sub_parent.lft and sub_parent.rgt and sub_parent.name=parentDepth.name 
group by child.name having depth >0 order by child.lft

USE JOIN

SELECT child.name,(COUNT(parent.name) - (parentDepth.depth + 1)) AS depth from 
category as child join category as parent on child.lft between parent.lft and parent.rgt join category as sub_parent on child.lft between sub_parent.lft and sub_parent.rgt,
( select child.name,(count(parent.name)-1) as depth from category as child,category as parent where child.lft between parent.lft and parent.rgt and child.name='ELECTRONICS' ) as parentDepth 
where sub_parent.name=parentDepth.name 
group by child.name having depth >0 order by child.lft

i want to know with one is better ! I mean in performance and speed

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3 Answers 3

the difference in performance, if a difference exists, will be absolutely minimal. basically, the ,-syntax is nothing else than a shorter form of writing a join, so the only difference will be the time used to "parse" the statements. there are a lot of much more important things to do to get a better performance on the database like

  • using indexes
  • don't select unused fields
  • choose the best storage engine for your needs

personally, i would use the second syntax because it's more readable for me (and readable code is important - much more important than such tiny performance-differences) - but thats just my subjective opinion, others may like the first syntax because it's shorter...

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Use EXPLAIN before query to get information on how MySQL will execute your query, which tables it will use, how many rows it will read, which indexes exploit and so on...

Other solution is to run this query many times (let's say 100) and measure average response time.

Looking at your queries lead me to thought that you probably might write better one (not sure, though - too complicated for the first glance).

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I prefer to actually test and get data rather than speculate (even if if one's reasoning seems sound).

On the individual query level, one can use SHOW PROFILE statements to display profiling information for statements executed during the course of the current session:

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/show-profiles.html

This will give you an idea of how long a query takes to run on your MySQL database (that is, the duration or speed of the query). Of course, on the application level, there can be other things at stake.

For a general overview of how to optimize MySQL, an interesting book to take a look at is "High Performance MySQL" by Baron Schwartz, et al., published by O'Reilly Media, Inc. (ISBN: 9780596101718) http://www.highperfmysql.com/
The book details how to interpret the output from EXPLAIN statements, among many other useful topics.

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