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EDIT For what its worth, which admittedley may not be that much. I've done a little test to expand this question.

I've written two functions to enumerate the FizzBuzz "series."

private static IEnumerable<string> SimpleFizzBuzz(
        int start = 0,
        int end = int.MaxValue)
{
    return Enumerable.Range(start, end).Select(i =>
        i % 15 == 0 ? "fizzbuzz" :
        i % 3 == 0 ? "fizz" :
        i % 5 == 0 ? "buzz" :
        i.ToString(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture));
}

and,

private static IEnumerable<string> OptimizedFizzBuzz(
        int start = 0,
        int end = int.MaxValue)
{
    const int fizz = 3;
    const int buzz = 5;
    const string fizzString = "fizz";
    const string buzzString = "buzz";
    const string fizzBuzzString = fizzString + buzzString;

    var fizzer = start % fizz;
    var buzzer = start % buzz;

    if (fizzer == 0)
    {
        fizzer = fizz;
    }

    if (buzzer == 0)
    {
        buzzer = buzz;
    }

    for (var i = start; i <= end; i++)
    {
        if (buzzer == buzz)
        {
            if (fizzer == fizz)
            {
                yield return fizzBuzzString;
                buzzer = 1;
                fizzer = 1;
                continue;
            }

            yield return buzzString;
            buzzer = 1;
            fizzer++;
            continue;
        }

        if (fizzer == fizz)
        {
            yield return fizzString;
            buzzer++;
            fizzer = 1;
            continue;
        }

        yield return i.ToString(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
        fizzer++;
        buzzer++;
    }
}

I've done a little timing, compiled in Release configuration, with optimizations and run from the command line. Over 10^8 iterations, without the overhead of actually reporting each item, I get results that approximate to,

Simple: 14.5 Seconds

Optimized: 10 Seconds

You'll note that the "optimized" function is faster but more verbose. It's behaviour can be altered simply by changing the constants at its head.


Apologies if this seems a little trivial.

Consider this function.

using System.Text;

public string FizzBanger(int bound)
{
    StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder();
    for (int i = 1; i < bound; i++)
    {
        String line = String.Empty;
        if (i % 3 == 0) line += "fizz";
        if (i % 5 == 0) line += "buzz";
        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(line)) line = i.ToString();
        result.AppendLine(line.ToString());
    }
    return result.ToString();
}

The output will look like

1
2
fizz
4
buzz
fizz
7
8
fizz
buzz
11
fizz
13
14
fizzbuzz
16
...

Can anybody think of a better way of doing it? Please consider both performance and maintainability.

share|improve this question
    
Can you explain what you're trying to accomplish? Sure, I could run the code and examine the output, but I'd rather not. –  Cody Gray Apr 14 '11 at 9:47
1  
“Can anybody think of a better way of doing it?” to be honest? About a million. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 14 '11 at 9:53
3  
Performance wise... return "12fizz4bangfizz..." :) –  forsvarir Apr 14 '11 at 9:53
    
good answer forsvarir I added a parameter to make it more difficult. –  Jodrell Apr 14 '11 at 9:56
    
any 1 out of a million would be good. –  Jodrell Apr 14 '11 at 9:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted
StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder();

For a fixed upper bound (100) I wouldn’t bother with this but ok …

StringBuilder line = new StringBuilder();

But this StringBuilder isn’t only redundant, it’s really inefficient. And I don’t even need to benchmark to know this.

if (line.Length == 0)

And this just obscures the logic (this is supposed to implement the “fizzbuzz” problem, right?). Make the logic explicit.

Please consider both performance and maintainability.

That’s the wrong way round. Maintainability first, performance second (if at all). Your code is actually quite inefficient but that’s irrelevant: there are 100 iterations – performance doesn’t matter at all.

Furthermore, what maintainability overhead does this code have? It’s a toy sample with fixed specs. There are no maintainability issues. I wouldn’t even bother with anything fancy here, Linq solves this automagically:

return Enumerable.Range(1, bound - 1).Aggregate("",
    (accu, i) =>
        string.Format("{0}\n{1}", accu,
            i % 15 == 0 ? "fizzbuzz" :
            i % 3 == 0 ? "fizz" :
            i % 5 == 0 ? "buzz" : i.ToString()));

But I agree that this may strain readability if one isn’t used to the Aggregate function. So make it more explicit:

var result = new StringBuilder();
for (int i = 1; i < bound; i++)
    result.AppendLine(
        i % 15 == 0 ? "fizzbuzz" :
        i % 3 == 0 ? "fizz" :
        i % 5 == 0 ? "buzz" : i.ToString());
return result.ToString();

Everything else is over-engineering.

share|improve this answer
1  
Hey, be fair - the outer StringBuilder is good practise. If the whole thing was done with string + string a StringBuilder would be the first correction. –  Dan Puzey Apr 14 '11 at 9:59
    
I accept the line String Builder is an unnecessary overhead. If the line is not a fizz or bang I want to substitute the ordinal of the line. –  Jodrell Apr 14 '11 at 10:01
2  
@Dan … perhaps. For 100 items I’m not betting my money on StringBuilder being faster and I’d program for simplicity first and start improving once a benchmark says that it’s too slow. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 14 '11 at 10:02
    
thats what I'm looking for :-) +1 –  Jodrell Apr 14 '11 at 10:20
    
Tweaked the Aggregation Range and seed to avoid the spurious initial /n –  Jodrell Apr 14 '11 at 11:08

Assuming that your code is just an example of what you want to achieve... a proposal to create less StringBuilders:

{
      StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder();
      for (int i = 1; i < 101; i++)
      {
           var rest3 = i % 3;
           var rest5 = i % 5;

           if (rest3 == 0) result.Append("fizz");
           if (rest5 == 0) result.Append("bang");
           if (rest3 != 0 && rest5 != 0)
               result.Append(i);

           result.Append(System.Environment.NewLine);
      }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think this is a good way of optimizing without changing the design. (+1) –  Sandeep G B Apr 14 '11 at 10:08
    
not sure why you use var over bool but it doesn't really matter –  Jodrell Apr 14 '11 at 10:09
1  
I don’t think introducing variables for things like x % 3 actually improves readability (nor performance, come to that). –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 14 '11 at 10:13
    
@Konrad Rudolph - Completely agree, I'd never do this in production code. Performace I assume you have less overhead creating useless StringBuilders (which was the main change I proposed). But I'm assuming this is a test or proof of concept he's doing. I also didn't see your reply, otherwise I wouldn't post mine. Nice explanation, +1 for you. –  Haplo Apr 14 '11 at 10:30

What if we make things a bit more difficult? 1) No division or modulo operations allowed; 2) The loop must skip all unnecessary iterations. Here is the answer:

int n3 = 3;
int n5 = 5;
int i = 3;
while (i <= 100)
{
    Console.Write(i.ToString() + " - ");

    if (i == n3)
    {
        Console.Write("fizz");

        n3 = n3 + 3;
    }

    if (i == n5)
    {
        Console.Write("buzz");

        n5 = n5 + 5;
    }

    Console.WriteLine();

    i = n3 < n5 ? n3 : n5;
}
share|improve this answer

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