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I have the following in my application controller:

def is_number?(object)
  true if Float(object) rescue false
end

and the following condition in my controller:

if mystring.is_number?

end

The condition is throwing an undefined method error. I'm guessing I've defined is_number in the wrong place...?

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I know a lot of people are here because of codeschool's Rails for Zombies Testing class. Just wait for him to keep explaining. The tests aren't supposed to pass --- its OK to have you test fail in error, you can always patch rails to invent methods such as self.is_number? –  boulder_ruby Feb 28 '13 at 19:33

11 Answers 11

up vote 65 down vote accepted

If you want to be able to do

mystring.is_number?

you can declare your method on the String class:

class String
  def is_number?
    true if Float(self) rescue false
  end
end

Otherwise you need to use

is_number?(mystring)

as others have pointed out.

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This is what I was after. It wasn't declaring it on the String class so wasn't able to call it as expected. Thanks Jakob! –  Jamie B Apr 14 '11 at 10:24
    
This is a bad idea. "330.346.11".to_f # => 330.346 –  epochwolf Nov 2 '11 at 23:15
4  
There is no to_f in the above, and Float() doesn't exhibit that behavior: Float("330.346.11") raises ArgumentError: invalid value for Float(): "330.346.11" –  Jakob S Nov 3 '11 at 10:29
3  
If you use that patch, I'd rename it to numeric?, to stay in line with ruby naming conventions (Numeric classes inherit from Numeric, is_ prefixes are javaish). –  platzhirsch Jun 24 '12 at 18:34
3  
Not really relevant to the original question, but I'd probably put the code in lib/core_ext/string.rb. –  Jakob S Aug 7 '12 at 8:48
class String
  def numeric?
    return true if self =~ /^\d+$/
    true if Float(self) rescue false
  end
end  

p "1".numeric?  # => true
p "1.2".numeric? # => true
p "5.4e-29".numeric? # => true
p "12e20".numeric? # true
p "1a".numeric? # => false
p "1.2.3.4".numeric? # => false
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4  
/^\d+$/ is not a safe regexp in Ruby, /\A\d+\Z/ is. (e.g. "42\nsome text" would return true) –  Timothee A Sep 1 at 15:18

no you're just using it wrong. your is_number? has an argument. you called it without the argument

you should be doing is_number?(mystring)

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Based on the is_number? method in the question, using is_a? is not giving the correct answer. If mystring is indeed a String, mystring.is_a?(Integer) will always be false. It looks like he wants a result like is_number?("12.4") #=> true –  Jakob S Apr 14 '11 at 10:15
    
mmm good point, lemme update that –  corroded Apr 14 '11 at 10:20
    
Jakob S is correct. mystring is indeed always a string, but may be comprise of just numbers. perhaps my question should have been is_numeric? so as not to confuse the datatype –  Jamie B Apr 14 '11 at 10:23

Here's a benchmark for common ways to address this problem. Note which one you should use probably depends on the ratio of false cases expected.

  1. If they are relatively uncommon casting is definitely fastest.
  2. If false cases are common and you are just checking for ints, comparison vs a transformed state is a good option.
  3. If false cases are common and you are checking floats, regexp is probably the way to go

If performance doesn't matter use what you like. :-)

Integer checking details:

# 1.9.3-p448
#
# Calculating -------------------------------------
#                 cast     57485 i/100ms
#            cast fail      5549 i/100ms
#                 to_s     47509 i/100ms
#            to_s fail     50573 i/100ms
#               regexp     45187 i/100ms
#          regexp fail     42566 i/100ms
# -------------------------------------------------
#                 cast  2353703.4 (±4.9%) i/s -   11726940 in   4.998270s
#            cast fail    65590.2 (±4.6%) i/s -     327391 in   5.003511s
#                 to_s  1420892.0 (±6.8%) i/s -    7078841 in   5.011462s
#            to_s fail  1717948.8 (±6.0%) i/s -    8546837 in   4.998672s
#               regexp  1525729.9 (±7.0%) i/s -    7591416 in   5.007105s
#          regexp fail  1154461.1 (±5.5%) i/s -    5788976 in   5.035311s

require 'benchmark/ips'

int = '220000'
bad_int = '22.to.2'

Benchmark.ips do |x|
  x.report('cast') do
    Integer(int) rescue false
  end

  x.report('cast fail') do
    Integer(bad_int) rescue false
  end

  x.report('to_s') do
    int.to_i.to_s == int
  end

  x.report('to_s fail') do
    bad_int.to_i.to_s == bad_int
  end

  x.report('regexp') do
    int =~ /^\d+$/
  end

  x.report('regexp fail') do
    bad_int =~ /^\d+$/
  end
end

Float checking details:

# 1.9.3-p448
#
# Calculating -------------------------------------
#                 cast     47430 i/100ms
#            cast fail      5023 i/100ms
#                 to_s     27435 i/100ms
#            to_s fail     29609 i/100ms
#               regexp     37620 i/100ms
#          regexp fail     32557 i/100ms
# -------------------------------------------------
#                 cast  2283762.5 (±6.8%) i/s -   11383200 in   5.012934s
#            cast fail    63108.8 (±6.7%) i/s -     316449 in   5.038518s
#                 to_s   593069.3 (±8.8%) i/s -    2962980 in   5.042459s
#            to_s fail   857217.1 (±10.0%) i/s -    4263696 in   5.033024s
#               regexp  1383194.8 (±6.7%) i/s -    6884460 in   5.008275s
#          regexp fail   723390.2 (±5.8%) i/s -    3613827 in   5.016494s

require 'benchmark/ips'

float = '12.2312'
bad_float = '22.to.2'

Benchmark.ips do |x|
  x.report('cast') do
    Float(float) rescue false
  end

  x.report('cast fail') do
    Float(bad_float) rescue false
  end

  x.report('to_s') do
    float.to_f.to_s == float
  end

  x.report('to_s fail') do
    bad_float.to_f.to_s == bad_float
  end

  x.report('regexp') do
    float =~ /^[-+]?[0-9]*\.?[0-9]+$/
  end

  x.report('regexp fail') do
    bad_float =~ /^[-+]?[0-9]*\.?[0-9]+$/
  end
end
share|improve this answer

Relying on the raised exception is not the fastest, readable nor reliable solution.
I'd do the following :

my_string.should =~ /^[0-9]+$/
share|improve this answer
    
This only works for positive integers, however. Values like '-1', '0.0', or '1_000' all return false even though they are valid numeric values. You're looking at something like /^[-.0-9]+$/, but that erroneously accepts '--'. –  Jakob S Apr 14 '11 at 11:03
6  
From Rails 'validates_numericality_of': raw_value.to_s =~ /\A[+-]?\d+\Z/ –  Morten Aug 17 '12 at 20:09

this is how i do it, but i think too there must be a better way

object.to_i.to_s == object || object.to_f.to_s == object
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4  
It does not recognize floating notation, e.g. 1.2e+35. –  hipertracker Jul 25 '12 at 16:13

If you prefer not to use exceptions as part of the logic, you might try this:

class String
   def numeric?
    !(self =~ /^-?\d+(\.\d*)?$/).nil?
  end
end

Or, if you want it to work across all object classes, replace class String with class Object an convert self to a string: !(self.to_s =~ /^-?\d+(\.\d*)?$/).nil?

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In rails 4, you need to put require File.expand_path('../../lib', __FILE__) + '/ext/string' in your config/application.rb

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actually you don't need to do this, you could just put string.rb in "initializers" and it works! –  mahatmanich Jun 16 at 8:32

try:

def is_number?(param1)
    return param1.is_a? Numeric
end

puts is_number?(2) #=> True
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is_number?("2") will return false –  thanikkal Aug 4 at 4:48

How dumb is this solution?

def is_number?(i)
  begin
    i+0 == i
  rescue TypeError
    false
  end
end
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1  
This is sub-optimal because using '.respond_to?(:+)' is always better then failing and catching an exception on a specific method (:+) call. This might also fail for a variety of reasons were the Regex and conversion methods don't. –  Sqeaky Apr 28 at 17:17

try:

if is_number?(mystring)
// ...
end
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