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I have an XDocument object. I want to query for elements with a particular name at any depth using LINQ. When I use Descendants("element_name"), I only get elements that are direct children of the current level. What I'm looking for is the equivalent of "//element_name" in XPath...should I just use XPath, or is there a way to do it using LINQ methods? Thanks.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 101 down vote accepted

Descendants should work absolutely fine. Here's an example:

using System;
using System.Xml.Linq;

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        string xml = @"
<root>
  <child id='1'/>
  <child id='2'>
    <grandchild id='3' />
    <grandchild id='4' />
  </child>
</root>";
        XDocument doc = XDocument.Parse(xml);

        foreach (XElement element in doc.Descendants("grandchild"))
        {
            Console.WriteLine(element);
        }
    }
}

Results:

<grandchild id="3" />
<grandchild id="4" />

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1  
How would you tackle this if an element name was duplicated within an xml document? For example: If the xml contained a collection of <Cars> with sub elements of <Part>, and also a collection of <Planes> with sub elements of <Part>, and you want a list of Parts for Cars only. –  pfeds Dec 18 '12 at 9:54
5  
@pfeds: Then I'd use doc.Descendants("Cars").Descendants("Part") (or possibly .Elements("Part") if they were only direct children. –  Jon Skeet Dec 18 '12 at 10:58

An example indicating the namespace:

String TheDocumentContent =
@"
<TheNamespace:root xmlns:TheNamespace = 'http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema' >
   <TheNamespace:GrandParent>
      <TheNamespace:Parent>
         <TheNamespace:Child theName = 'Fred'  />
         <TheNamespace:Child theName = 'Gabi'  />
         <TheNamespace:Child theName = 'George'/>
         <TheNamespace:Child theName = 'Grace' />
         <TheNamespace:Child theName = 'Sam'   />
      </TheNamespace:Parent>
   </TheNamespace:GrandParent>
</TheNamespace:root>
";

XDocument TheDocument = XDocument.Parse( TheDocumentContent );

//Example 1:
var TheElements1 =
from
    AnyElement
in
    TheDocument.Descendants( "{http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema}Child" )
select
    AnyElement;

ResultsTxt.AppendText( TheElements1.Count().ToString() );

//Example 2:
var TheElements2 =
from
    AnyElement
in
    TheDocument.Descendants( "{http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema}Child" )
where
    AnyElement.Attribute( "theName" ).Value.StartsWith( "G" )
select
    AnyElement;

foreach ( XElement CurrentElement in TheElements2 )
{
    ResultsTxt.AppendText( "\r\n" + CurrentElement.Attribute( "theName" ).Value );
}
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1  
But, what if my source xml doesn't have a namespace? I suppose I can add one in code (have to look into that), but why is that necessary? In any event, root.Descendants("myTagName") doesn't find elements buried three or four levels deep in my code. –  EoRaptor013 Dec 10 '10 at 21:22
    
Thanks! We're using datacontract serialization. This creates a header like <MyClassEntries xmlns:i="w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"; xmlns="schemas.datacontract.org/2004/07/DataLayer.MyClass">; and I was stumped why I wasn't getting any descendants. I needed to add the {schemas.datacontract.org/2004/07/DataLayer.MyClass} prefix. –  Kim Nov 27 '13 at 22:00

Descendants will do exactly what you need, but be sure that you have included a namespace name together with element's name. If you omit it, you will probably get an empty list.

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There are two ways to accomplish this,

  1. Linq-to-xml
  2. XPath

The following are samples of using these approaches,

List<XElement> result = doc.Root.Element("emails").Elements("emailAddress").ToList();

If you use XPath, you need to do some manipulation with the IEnumerable:

IEnumerable<XElement> mails = ((IEnumerable)doc.XPathEvaluate("/emails/emailAddress")).Cast<XElement>();

Note that

var res = doc.XPathEvaluate("/emails/emailAddress");

results either a null pointer, or no results.

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1  
just to mention that XPathEvaluate is in the System.Xml.XPath namespace. –  Tahir Hassan Feb 8 '13 at 14:34
    
XPathEvaluate should do the trick, but your query only takes nodes at a particular depth (one). If you wanted to select all elements named "email" regardless of where in a document they occur, you'd use the path "//email". Obviously such paths are more expensive, since the entire tree must be walked whatever the name is, but it can be quite convenient - provided you know what you're doing. –  The Dag May 29 '13 at 18:04

I am using XPathSelectElements extension method which works in the same way to XmlDocument.SelectNodes method:

using System;
using System.Xml.Linq;
using System.Xml.XPath; // for XPathSelectElements

namespace testconsoleApp
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            XDocument xdoc = XDocument.Parse(
                @"<root>
                    <child>
                        <name>john</name>
                    </child>
                    <child>
                        <name>fred</name>
                    </child>
                    <child>
                        <name>mark</name>
                    </child>
                 </root>");

            foreach (var childElem in xdoc.XPathSelectElements("//child"))
            {
                string childName = childElem.Element("name").Value;
                Console.WriteLine(childName);
            }
        }
    }
}
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You can do it this way:

xml.Descendants().Where(p => p.Name.LocalName == "Name of the node to find")

where xml is a XDocument.

Be aware that the property Name returns an object that has a LocalName and a Namespace. That's why you have to use Name.LocalName if you want to compare by name.

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(Code and Instructions is for C# and may need to be slightly altered for other languages)

This example works perfect if you want to read from a Parent Node that has many children, for example look at the following XML;

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> 
<emails>
    <emailAddress>jdoe@set.ca</emailAddress>
    <emailAddress>jsmith@hit.ca</emailAddress>
    <emailAddress>rgreen@set_ig.ca</emailAddress> 
</emails>

Now with this code below (keeping in mind that the XML File is stored in resources (See the links at end of snippet for help on resources) You can obtain each email address within the "emails" tag.

XDocument doc = XDocument.Parse(Properties.Resources.EmailAddresses);

var emailAddresses = (from emails in doc.Descendants("emailAddress")
                      select emails.Value);

foreach (var email in emailAddresses)
{
    //Comment out if using WPF or Windows Form project
    Console.WriteLine(email.ToString());

   //Remove comment if using WPF or Windows Form project
   //MessageBox.Show(email.ToString());
}

Results

  1. jdoe@set.ca
  2. jsmith@hit.ca
  3. rgreen@set_ig.ca

Note: For Console Application and WPF or Windows Forms you must add the "using System.Xml.Linq;" Using directive at the top of your project, for Console you will also need to add a reference to this namespace before adding the Using directive. Also for Console there will be no Resource file by default under the "Properties folder" so you have to manually add the Resource file. The MSDN articles below, explain this in detail.

Adding and Editing Resources

How to: Add or Remove Resources

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Don't want to be mean here, but your example does not show grandchildren. emailAddress is a child of emails. I am wondering if there is a way to use Descendants without using namespaces? –  DmainEvent Mar 13 '12 at 11:24

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