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I'm not a SQL expert, and I'm reminded of the fact every time I need to do something beyond the basics. I have a test database that is not large in size, but the transaction log definitely is. How do I clear out the transaction log?

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17 Answers 17

up vote 139 down vote accepted

Making a log file smaller should really be reserved for scenarios where it encountered unexpected growth which you do not expect to happen again. If the log file will grow to the same size again, not very much is accomplished by shrinking it temporarily. Now, depending on the recovery goals of your database, these are the actions you should take.

First, take a full backup

Never make any changes to your database without ensuring you can restore it should something go wrong.

If you care about point-in-time recovery

(And by point-in-time recovery, I mean you care about being able to restore to anything other than a full or differential backup.)

Presumably your database is in FULL recovery mode. If not, then make sure it is:

ALTER DATABASE testdb SET RECOVERY FULL;

Even if you are taking regular full backups, the log file will grow and grow until you perform a log backup - this is for your protection, not to needlessly eat away at your disk space. You should be performing these log backups quite frequently, according to your recovery objectives. For example, if you have a business rule that states you can afford to lose no more than 15 minutes of data in the event of a disaster, you should have a job that backs up the log every 15 minutes. Here is a script that will generate timestamped file names based on the current time (but you can also do this with maintenance plans etc., just don't choose any of the shrink options in maintenance plans, they're awful).

DECLARE @path NVARCHAR(255) = N'\\backup_share\log\testdb_' 
  + CONVERT(CHAR(8), GETDATE(), 112) + '_'
  + REPLACE(CONVERT(CHAR(8), GETDATE(), 108),':','')
  + '.trn';

BACKUP LOG foo TO DISK = @path WITH INIT, COMPRESSION;

Note that \\backup_share\ should be on a different machine that represents a different underlying storage device. Backing these up to the same machine (or to a different machine that uses the same underlying disks, or a different VM that's on the same physical host) does not really help you, since if the machine blows up, you've lost your database and its backups. Depending on your network infrastructure it may make more sense to backup locally and then transfer them to a different location behind the scenes; in either case, you want to get them off the primary database machine as quickly as possible.

Now, once you have regular log backups running, it should be reasonable to shrink the log file to something more reasonable than whatever it's blown up to now. This does not mean running SHRINKFILE over and over again until the log file is 1 MB - even if you are backing up the log frequently, it still needs to accommodate the sum of any concurrent transactions that can occur. Log file autogrow events are expensive, since SQL Server has to zero out the files (unlike data files when instant file initialization is enabled), and user transactions have to wait while this happens. You want to do this grow-shrink-grow-shrink routine as little as possible, and you certainly don't want to make your users pay for it.

Note that you may need to back up the log twice before a shrink is possible (thanks Robert).

So, you need to come up with a practical size for your log file. Nobody here can tell you what that is without knowing a lot more about your system, but if you've been frequently shrinking the log file and it has been growing again, a good watermark is probably 10-50% higher than the largest it's been. Let's say that comes to 200 MB, and you want any subsequent autogrowth events to be 50 MB, then you can adjust the log file size this way:

USE [master];
GO
ALTER DATABASE Test1 
  MODIFY FILE
  (NAME = yourdb_log, SIZE = 200MB, FILEGROWTH = 50MB);
GO

Note that if the log file is currently > 200 MB, you may need to run this first:

USE yourdb;
GO
DBCC SHRINKFILE(yourdb_log, 200);
GO

If you don't care about point-in-time recovery

If this is a test database, and you don't care about point-in-time recovery, then you should make sure that your database is in SIMPLE recovery mode.

ALTER DATABASE testdb SET RECOVERY SIMPLE;

Putting the database in SIMPLE recovery mode will make sure that SQL Server re-uses portions of the log file (essentially phasing out inactive transactions) instead of growing to keep a record of all transactions (like FULL recovery does until you back up the log). CHECKPOINT events will help control the log and make sure that it doesn't need to grow unless you generate a lot of t-log activity between CHECKPOINTs.

Next, you should make absolute sure that this log growth was truly due to an abnormal event (say, an annual spring cleaning or rebuilding your biggest indexes), and not due to normal, everyday usage. If you shrink the log file to a ridiculously small size, and SQL Server just has to grow it again to accommodate your normal activity, what did you gain? Were you able to make use of that disk space you freed up only temporarily? If you need an immediate fix, then you can run the following:

USE yourdb;
GO
CHECKPOINT;
GO
CHECKPOINT; -- run twice to ensure file wrap-around
GO
DBCC SHRINKFILE(yourdb_log, 200 MB);
GO

Otherwise, set an appropriate size and growth rate. As per the example in the point-in-time recovery case, you can use the same code and logic to determine what file size is appropriate and set reasonable autogrowth parameters.

Some things you don't want to do

  • Back up the log with TRUNCATE_ONLY option and then SHRINKFILE. For one, this TRUNCATE_ONLY option has been deprecated and is no longer available in current versions of SQL Server. Second, if you are in FULL recovery model, this will destroy your log chain and require a new, full backup.

  • Detach the database, delete the log file, and re-attach. I can't emphasize how dangerous this can be. Your database may not come back up, it may come up as suspect, you may have to revert to a backup (if you have one), etc. etc.

  • Use the "shrink database" option. DBCC SHRINKDATABASE and the maintenance plan option to do the same are bad ideas, especially if you really only need to resolve a log problem issue. Target the file you want to adjust and adjust it independently, using DBCC SHRINKFILE or ALTER DATABASE ... MODIFY FILE (examples above).

  • Shrink the log file to 1 MB. This looks tempting because, hey, SQL Server will let me do it in certain scenarios, and look at all the space it frees! Unless your database is read only (and it is, you should mark it as such using ALTER DATABASE), this will absolutely just lead to many unnecessary growth events, as the log has to accommodate current transactions regardless of the recovery model. What is the point of freeing up that space temporarily, just so SQL Server can take it back slowly and painfully?

  • Create a second log file. This will provide temporarily relief for the drive that has filled your disk, but this is like trying to fix a punctured lung with a band-aid. You should deal with the problematic log file directly instead of just adding another potential problem. Other than redirecting some transaction log activity to a different drive, a second log file really does nothing for you (unlike a second data file), since only one of the files can ever be used at a time. Paul Randal also explains why multiple log files can bite you later.

Be proactive

Instead of shrinking your log file to some small amount and letting it constantly autogrow at a small rate on its own, set it to some reasonably large size (one that will accommodate the sum of your largest set of concurrent transactions) and set a reasonable autogrow setting as a fallback, so that it doesn't have to grow multiple times to satisfy single transactions and so that it will be relatively rare for it to ever have to grow during normal business operations.

The worst possible settings here are 1 MB growth or 10% growth. Funny enough, these are the defaults for SQL Server (which I've complained about and asked for changes to no avail) - 1 MB for data files, and 10% for log files. The former is much too small in this day and age, and the latter leads to longer and longer events every time (say, your log file is 500 MB, first growth is 50 MB, next growth is 55 MB, next growth is 60.5 MB, etc. etc. - and on slow I/O, believe me, you will really notice this curve).

Further reading

Please don't stop here; while much of the advice you see out there about shrinking log files is inherently bad and even potentially disastrous, there are some people who care more about data integrity than freeing up disk space.

A blog post I wrote four years ago, when I saw a few "here's how to shrink the log file" posts spring up.

A blog post Brent Ozar wrote four years ago, pointing to multiple resources, in response to a SQL Server Magazine article that should not have been published.

A blog post by Paul Randal explaining why t-log maintenance is important and why you shouldn't shrink your data files, either.

Mike Walsh has a great answer covering some of these aspects too, including reasons why you might not be able to shrink your log file immediately.

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3  
Point-in-time recovery isn't the only reason to use full recovery model. The main reason is to prevent data loss. Your potential for data loss is the length between backups. If you're only doing a daily backup, your potential for data loss is 24 hours. If you then add log backups every half hour, your potential for data loss becomes 30 minutes. Additionally, log backups are required to perform any sort of piecemeal restore (like to recover from corruption). –  Robert L Davis Aug 17 '13 at 19:23
1  
That aside, this is the most complete and correct answer given on this page. –  Robert L Davis Aug 17 '13 at 19:24
    
@Robert thanks, I added clarification to what I mean by the two different categories. –  Aaron Bertrand Aug 17 '13 at 19:25
4  
I would also want to add that clearing the log is done by backing up the log (in full or bulk-logged recovery) or a checkpoint (in simple recovery). However, if you are in a situation where you must shrink the log file, that's not enough. You need to cause the currently active VLF to cycle back to the start of the log file. You can force this in SQL 2008 and newer by issuing two log backups or checkpoints back-to-back. The first one clears it and the second one cycles it back to the start of the file. –  Robert L Davis Aug 17 '13 at 19:26
2  
@Doug_Ivison because at any point, log records could be purged. What would be the point of allowing you to backup a log which is incomplete? In simple recovery, the log is only really used to allow for rollbacks of transactions. Once a transaction has been committed or rolled back, the next second it could be gone from the log. –  Aaron Bertrand Jan 17 at 18:22

DISCLAIMER: Please read comments below carefully, and I assume you've already read the accepted answer. As I said nearly 5 years ago :

if anyone has any comments to add for situations when this is NOT an adequate or optimal solution then please comment below


  • Right click on the database name.

  • Select Tasks -> Shrink -> Database

  • Then click OK!

I usually open the Windows Explorer directory containing the database files so I can immediately see the effect.

I was actually quite surprised this worked! Normally I've used DBCC before, but I just tried that and it didn't shrink anything so I tried the GUI (2005) and it worked great - freeing up 17Gb in 10 seconds

Edit: In Full recovery mode this might not work, so you have to either back up the log first, or change to Simple recovery, then shrink the file. [thanks @onupdatecascade for this]

--

ps: I appreciate what some have commented regarding the dangers of this, but in my environment have had no issues doing this myself especially since I always do a full backup first. So please take into consideration what your environment is, and how this affects your backup strategy and job security before continuing. All I was doing was pointing people to a feature provided by Microsoft!

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36  
In Full recovery mode this might not work, so you have to either back up the log first, or change to Simple recovery, then shrink the file. –  onupdatecascade Aug 6 '09 at 6:12
4  
@onupdatecascade - good call on full recovery trick. had another database with a huge log : switched to simple, then shrink database and switched back to full. log file down to 500kb! –  Simon_Weaver Sep 17 '09 at 6:28
19  
Sorry. But this answer simply could NOT be MORE wrong. By shrinking the database you WILL grow the transaction log file. ANY time you move data around in a SQL Server database, you'll require logging - bloating the log file. To decrease log size, either set the DB to Simple Recovery OR (if you care/need logged data - and you almost always do in production) backup the log. More Details in these simple, free, videos: sqlservervideos.com/video/logging-essentials sqlservervideos.com/video/sql2528-log-files –  Michael K. Campbell Aug 17 '13 at 6:06
17  
Wow, kudos for getting 1300+ rep for this answer, but it really is terrible advice. –  Aaron Bertrand Aug 17 '13 at 15:02
3  
In additional to what Michael and Aaron said, if you are switching back and forth between full and simple recovery model, you shouldn't be allowed to touch SQL Server until you've at least learned the basics. –  Robert L Davis Aug 17 '13 at 19:32
USE AdventureWorks2008R2;
GO
-- Truncate the log by changing the database recovery model to SIMPLE.
ALTER DATABASE AdventureWorks2008R2
SET RECOVERY SIMPLE;
GO
-- Shrink the truncated log file to 1 MB.
DBCC SHRINKFILE (AdventureWorks2008R2_Log, 1);
GO
-- Reset the database recovery model.
ALTER DATABASE AdventureWorks2008R2
SET RECOVERY FULL;
GO

from : http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189493.aspx

you may want to backup first

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That's probably the best answer. Nice&Simple, my upvote :) –  Maimonides Mar 17 at 10:32
    
thanks Maimonides, its from the docs, so I would say it is the best :P especially because was not invented by me :) –  Rui Lima Mar 17 at 13:31

If you do not use the transaction logs for restores (i.e. You only ever do full backups), you can set Recovery Mode to "Simple", and the transaction log will very shortly shrink and never fill up again.

If you are using SQL 7 or 2000, you can enable "truncate log on checkpoint" in the database options tab. This has the same effect.

This is not recomended in production environments obviously, since you will not be able to restore to a point in time.

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Setting the recovery mode to simple will not, on its own, magically shrink the transaction log. –  Aaron Bertrand Aug 17 '13 at 15:04
    
@Aaron Not on it's own, no. I assumed that the OP would be using their test database, and therefore "the transaction log will very shortly shrink", but you are correct in that it's more of a side effect: Recovery mode of simple will probably make you end up with a shrunken transaction log soon –  Jonathan Aug 19 '13 at 10:22
    
"Simple...and never fill up again" -- not true. I've seen it happen (in the past 48 hours) on a database where the Recovery Model was set to "SIMPLE". The logfile's filegrowth was set to "restricted", and we'd been doing some immense activity on it... I understand that it was an unusual situation. (In our situation, where we had plenty of disc space, we increased the logfile size, and set logfile filegrowth to "unrestricted"... which by the way --interface bug-- shows up, after the change, as "restricted" with a maxsize of 2,097,152 MB.) –  Doug_Ivison Dec 10 '13 at 18:10
1  
@Doug_Ivison Yes, the transaction log will have open transactions in it, but they will be removed in simple mode once a checkpoint has taken place. This answer is only intended as a quick "my development/test box has a big transaction log, and I want it to go away so I don't need to worry about it too often", rather than ever intended to go into a production environment. To re-iterate: Do not do this in production. –  Jonathan Jan 17 at 9:51
1  
That's all true, and I get that it was a development-only quick approach. Why I commented: until it happened to me, I actually thought the simple recovery model could NEVER fill up... and I think it took me longer to figure out / resolve, while I came to understand that unusually large transactions can do that. –  Doug_Ivison Jan 17 at 11:56

[answer ads more details than requested but I hope it’s useful]

Below is a script to shrink transaction log but I’d definitely recommend backing up transaction log before shrinking it.

If you just shrink file you are going to lose a ton of data that may come as a live saver in case of disaster. Transaction log contains a lot of useful data that can be read using 3rd party transaction log reader (it can be read manually but with extreme effort though). Transaction log is also a must when it comes to point in time recovery so don’t just throw it away but make sure you back it up beforehand.

Here are several posts where people used data stored in transaction log to accomplish recovery

How to view transaction logs in sql server 2008

Read the log file (*.LDF) in sql server 2008

USE DATABASE_NAME;
GO

ALTER DATABASE DATABASE_NAME
SET RECOVERY SIMPLE;
GO
--first parameter is log file name and second is size in MB
DBCC SHRINKFILE (DATABASE_NAME_Log, 1);

ALTER DATABASE DATABASE_NAME
SET RECOVERY FULL;
GO

You may get error that looks like this when executing commands above

“Cannot shrink log file (log file name) because the logical
log file located at the end of the file is in use “

This means that TLOG is in use. In this case try executing this several times in a row or find a way to reduce database activities.

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Here is a simple and very inelegant & potentially dangerous way.

  1. Backup DB
  2. Detach DB
  3. Rename Log file
  4. Attach DB
  5. New log file will be recreated
  6. Delete Renamed Log file.

I'm guessing that you are not doing log backups. (Which truncate the log). My advice is to change recovery model from full to simple. This will prevent log bloat.

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11  
Respectfully, deleting/ renaming/ recreating/ replacing the log is a very bad idea. Shrink is must less risky, plus it's pretty simple to do. –  onupdatecascade Aug 6 '09 at 6:11
5  
+1 - Inelegant or not, this method has got me out of hot water a couple of times with database logs that have filled the entire disk, such that even a shrink command can't run. –  Shaul Feb 26 '12 at 9:13
3  
Is there not a risk of uncheckpointed transactions existing in the log? –  Paul Jul 2 '13 at 8:10

This technique that John recommends is not recommended as there is no guarantee that the database will attach without the log file. Change the database from full to simple, force a checkpoint and wait a few minutes. The SQL Server will clear the log, which you can then shrink using DBCC SHRINKFILE.

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+1 I suspected it was hacky. –  John Nolan Feb 6 '09 at 22:32
    
...but I have done it dozens of times without issue. perhaps you could explain why the db may not re-attach. –  John Nolan Feb 6 '09 at 22:35
    
I have on occasion (not very often) seen the SQL Server not be able to attach the database back to the database when the log file has been deleted. This leaves you with a useless MDF file. There are several possibilities that can cause the problem. Transactions pending rollback come to mind. –  mrdenny Feb 8 '09 at 21:39
3  
I agree with this tactic, but it should be reserved for cases where the log has blown up due to some unforeseen and/or extraordinary event. If you set up a job to do this every week, you're doing it very, very wrong. –  Aaron Bertrand Aug 17 '13 at 15:06
1  
Very, very true Aaron. –  mrdenny Aug 18 '13 at 6:17

Most answers here so far are assuming you do not actually need the Transaction Log file, however if your database is using the FULL recovery model, and you want to keep your backups in case you need to restore the database, then do not truncate or delete the log file the way many of these answers suggest.

Eliminating the log file (through truncating it, discarding it, erasing it, etc) will break your backup chain, and will prevent you from restoring to any point in time since your last full, differential, or transaction log backup, until the next full or differential backup is made.

From the Microsoft article onBACKUP

We recommend that you never use NO_LOG or TRUNCATE_ONLY to manually truncate the transaction log, because this breaks the log chain. Until the next full or differential database backup, the database is not protected from media failure. Use manual log truncation in only very special circumstances, and create backups of the data immediately.

To avoid that, backup your log file to disk before shrinking it. The syntax would look something like this:

BACKUP LOG MyDatabaseName 
TO DISK='C:\DatabaseBackups\MyDatabaseName_backup_2013_01_31_095212_8797154.trn'

DBCC SHRINKFILE (N'MyDatabaseName_Log', 200)
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3  
I agree with your answer, except for the , 1) part. The problem is that if you shrink it to 1 MB, the growth events leading to a normal log size will be quite costly, and there will be many of them if the growth rate is left to the default of 10%. –  Aaron Bertrand Aug 17 '13 at 19:22
    
@AaronBertrand Thanks, that's a good point to make –  Rachel Aug 18 '13 at 18:12

To Truncate the log file:

  • Backup the database
  • Detach the database, either by using Enterprise Manager or by executing : *Sp_DetachDB [DBName]*
  • Delete the transaction log file. (or rename the file, just in case)
  • Re-attach the database again using: *Sp_AttachDB [DBName]*
  • When the database is attached, a new transaction log file is created.

To Shrink the log file:

  • Backup log [DBName] with No_Log
  • Shrink the database by either:

    Using Enterprise manager :- Right click on the database, All tasks, Shrink database, Files, Select log file, OK.

    Using T-SQL :- *Dbcc Shrinkfile ([Log_Logical_Name])*

You can find the logical name of the log file by running sp_helpdb or by looking in the properties of the database in Enterprise Manager.

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First check the database Recovery model. By default SQL Server Epxress edition create database in Simple recovery model (if iam not mistaken).

Backup Log DatabaseName With Truncate_Only

DBCC ShrinkFile(yourLogical_LogFileName, 50)

SP_helpfile will give you the logical log file name

Refer :

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/873235.

If your database is in Full Recovery Model and if you are not taking TL backup , then change it to SIMPLE.

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This is the way that I clear log files on my dev boxes. Prod environments with all of the associated backup strategies etc I leave to the DBA's :-) –  Joon Aug 13 '09 at 8:30
    
TRUNCATE_ONLY is no longer an option in current versions of SQL Server, and it's not recommended on versions that do support it (see Rachel's answer). –  Aaron Bertrand Aug 17 '13 at 15:08

Use the DBCC ShrinkFile ({logicalLogName}, TRUNCATEONLY) command. If this is a Test database and you are trying to save/reclaim space this will help. Remember though that TX logs do have a sort of minimum/steady state size that they will grow up to. Depending upon your recovery model you may not be able to shrink the log - If in FULL and you aren't issuing TX log backups the log can't be shrunk - it will grow forever. If you don't need tx log backups switch your recovery model to Simple.

And remember, never ever under any circumstances Delete the log (LDF) file!!! You will pretty much have instant database corruption. Cooked! Done! Lost Data! If left "unrepaired" the main MDF could become corrupt permanently.

Never ever delete the transaction log - you will lose data! Part of your data is in the TX Log (regardless of recovery model)... if you detach and "rename" the TX log file that effectively Deletes part of your database.

For those that have deleted the TX Log you may want to run a few checkdb commands and fix the corruption before you lose more data.

Check out Paul Randal's blog on this very topic. http://sqlskills.com/BLOGS/PAUL/category/Bad-Advice.aspx#p4

Also in general do not use shrinkfile on the MDF's as it can severely fragment your data. Check out his Bad Advice section for more info ("Why you should not shrink your data files")

Check out Paul's website - he covers these very questions. Last month he walked through many of these issues in his Myth A Day series.

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+1 For being the first answer to mention that this may not be a good idea! The OP specifies a test database but it is a point well worth making for the more general case. –  Martin Smith Jan 3 '11 at 14:04

To my experience on most SQL Servers there is no backup of the transaction log. Full backups or differential backups are common practice, but transaction log backups are really seldom. So the transaction log file grows forever (until the disk is full). In this case the recovery model should be set to "simple". Don't forget to modify the system databases "model" and "tempdb", too.

A backup of the database "tempdb" makes no sense, so the recovery model of this db should always be "simple".

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Just setting the database to simple won't shrink the log file, in whatever state it's currently in. It just may help prevent it from growing further (but it still could). –  Aaron Bertrand Aug 17 '13 at 15:04
  1. take back up of MDB file.
  2. Stop sql services
  3. Rename Log File
  4. start service

(system will create a new log file.)

delete or move renamed log file.

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Example:-

DBCC SQLPERF(LOGSPACE)

BACKUP LOG Comapny WITH TRUNCATE_ONLY

DBCC SHRINKFILE (Company_log, 500)

DBCC SQLPERF(LOGSPACE)

share|improve this answer
    
TRUNCATE_ONLY is no longer an option in current versions of SQL Server, and it's not recommended on versions that do support it (see Rachel's answer). –  Aaron Bertrand Aug 17 '13 at 15:08

try this

USE DatabaseName

GO

DBCC SHRINKFILE( TransactionLogName, 1)

BACKUP LOG DatabaseName WITH TRUNCATE_ONLY

DBCC SHRINKFILE( TransactionLogName, 1)

GO

Regards,

Muhammad Imran

share|improve this answer
    
TRUNCATE_ONLY is no longer an option in current versions of SQL Server, and it's not recommended on versions that do support it (see Rachel's answer). –  Aaron Bertrand Aug 17 '13 at 15:10
    
It works for me using MSSQL Server 2005 Standard edition –  bksi Jan 21 at 18:19
  1. Backup DB
  2. Detach DB
  3. Rename Log file
  4. Attach DB (while attaching remove renamed .ldf (log file).Select it and remove by pressing Remove button)
  5. New log file will be recreated
  6. Delete Renamed Log file.

This will work but it is suggested to take backup of your database first.

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DB Transaction Log Shrink to min size:

  1. Backup: Transaction log
  2. Shrink files: Transaction log
  3. Backup: Transaction log
  4. Shrink files: Transaction log

I made tests on several number of DBs: this sequence works.

It usually shrinks to 2MB.

OR by a script:

DECLARE @DB_Name nvarchar(255);
DECLARE @DB_LogFileName nvarchar(255);
SET @DB_Name = '<Database Name>';               --Input Variable
SET @DB_LogFileName = '<LogFileEntryName>';         --Input Variable
EXEC 
(
'USE ['+@DB_Name+']; '+
'BACKUP LOG ['+@DB_Name+'] WITH TRUNCATE_ONLY ' +
'DBCC SHRINKFILE( '''+@DB_LogFileName+''', 2) ' +
'BACKUP LOG ['+@DB_Name+'] WITH TRUNCATE_ONLY ' +
'DBCC SHRINKFILE( '''+@DB_LogFileName+''', 2)'
)
GO
share|improve this answer
    
TRUNCATE_ONLY is no longer an option in current versions of SQL Server, and it's not recommended on versions that do support it (see Rachel's answer). –  Aaron Bertrand Aug 17 '13 at 15:13

protected by Shai Dec 19 '13 at 10:20

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