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In my code below, the file is being written correctly as far as I can tell. When I look in the file floats.dat I see this stream of binary ÍÌL@33c@ÍÌÜ@ffFAßOeA^@^@bBf6zE33äCff<83>BÍ̦B

However my program always ends up triggering this if statement:

if(fread(inputFloats, sizeof(float), LENGTH, binaryFile) < LENGTH)
{
   fprintf(stderr, "Problem reading some or all data from %s\n\n", binaryFileName);
   return EXIT_FAILURE;
}

Does anybody see something I've done wrong here? Full code below.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#define LENGTH 10

int main(void)
{
   FILE *binaryFile, *textFile;
   char *binaryFileName = "floats.dat", *textFileName = "floats.txt";
   float floats[LENGTH] = {3.2, 3.55, 6.9, 12.4, 14.332, 56.5, 4003.4, 456.4, 65.7, 83.4};
   float inputFloats[LENGTH];
   int i;

   if((binaryFile = fopen(binaryFileName, "r+")) == NULL)
   {
      fprintf(stderr, "Problem opening %s", binaryFileName);
   }

   if(fwrite(floats, sizeof(float), LENGTH, binaryFile) < LENGTH)
   {
      fprintf(stderr, "Problem writing some or all data to %s\n", binaryFileName);
      return EXIT_FAILURE;
   }

   printf("DATA WRITTEN SUCCESSFULLY\n");

   if(fread(inputFloats, sizeof(float), LENGTH, binaryFile) < LENGTH)
   {
      fprintf(stderr, "Problem reading some or all data from %s\n\n", binaryFileName);
      return EXIT_FAILURE;
   }

   for(i = 0; i < LENGTH; i++)
   {
      printf("float[%d] = %f\n", i, floats[i]);
   }

   return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Are there seperate file-positions for reading and writing on the same file? If not fread is trying to read floats behind those that you just wrote. In that case use rewind(binaryFile). – LumpN Apr 14 '11 at 13:29
up vote 7 down vote accepted
  • You're not working with text data so you should specify a binary mode when opening the file. Use r+b instead of r+
  • You need to fseek(binaryFile, 0, SEEK_SET) to "rewind" the file after writing. rewind can also be used for this case - fseek allows you to position the read/write pointer wherever you want.
share|improve this answer
    
That's perfect thanks Erik. Is there any downfall to using a simpler call such as what @steabert used below - rewind(binaryFile)? – Chris Apr 14 '11 at 13:39
    
Also I was just playing around, and now that it's working I still get the same result even when using 'r+'. Is specifying 'r+b' a fail safe for your code in the event that it is ported to a different system with perhaps a different implementation of fopen which doesn't accept using binary files when opened with 'r+'? – Chris Apr 14 '11 at 13:41
1  
@Chris Paynter: rewind is perfectly fine here. You should know about fseek though. r+b ensures that noone fiddles with embedded \n - it may not be needed on your platform – Erik Apr 14 '11 at 13:46

The FILE structure keeps a record of where in the file it is currently pointing. Since you've just written to binaryFile, the file pointer is at the end of what you've written.

You therefore need to rewind the file, using fseek(binaryFile, 0, SEEK_SET); before you read.

share|improve this answer

You forgot to rewind your file before reading it:

rewind(binaryFile);
share|improve this answer

When you finish writing to the file, the FILE pointer is at the end of it, so of course if you try reading it will not work. Try using fseek to move the pointer to the beginning of the file before reading.

Please avoid this :

if((binaryFile = fopen(binaryFileName, "r+")) == NULL) {

and prefer this:

binaryFile = fopen(binaryFileName, "rb+");
if(!binaryFile) {
share|improve this answer
    
Nothing wrong with assignment in a condition when it's as clearly readable as it is here. – Erik Apr 14 '11 at 13:30
    
= in a conditional jump is never worth it. Better safe than sorry. – Giovanni Funchal Apr 14 '11 at 13:32

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