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My homework problem is to write a Python function called LetterCount() which takes a string as an argument and returns a dictionary of letter counts. However, my code includes white space and commas as a part of the dictionary which i don't want. Can you please help me out. How do i remove the white space from my list? Here is my code?

import string
def LetterCount(str):
    str= str.lower().strip()
    str = str.strip(string.punctuation)
    list1=list(str)
    lcDict= {}
    for l in list1:
        if l in lcDict:
            lcDict[l] +=1
        else:
            lcDict[l]= 1
    print lcDict

LetterCount("Abracadabra, Monsignor")
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6  
Looks suspiciously like this question –  Matt Ball Apr 14 '11 at 14:11
    
yea i saw that before i posted my question but we never did this code in class. so i am doing it the way i know –  Ivan Apr 14 '11 at 14:17

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can also check if l is an alphabetic character (if l.isalpha())

Example:

   import string
    def LetterCount(str):
            str= str.lower().strip()
            str = str.strip(string.punctuation)
            list1=list(str)
            lcDict= {}
            for l in list1:
                    if l.isalpha():
                            if l in lcDict:
                                    lcDict[l] +=1
                            else:
                                    lcDict[l]= 1
            print lcDict

    LetterCount("Abracadabra, Monsignor")
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2  
You should tech him to fish! :) –  Trufa Apr 14 '11 at 14:23
    
@Trufa. You are right, I realized late... I should have give just a hint... –  pconcepcion Apr 14 '11 at 14:29
1  
IMO in this kind of question, if you pointing the OP to l.isalpha() should be enough, since investigating is part of the learning process... No harm done of course, I don't doubt your intentions are good! –  Trufa Apr 14 '11 at 14:33

Before you assign the count in the else branch, you should check whether l is a letter. Only assign the count if it is a letter.

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i did it by using the .isalpha() method for l and it worked. it was silly not to think of that. thank you i am new to programming and sometimes a little detail slips off my mind. –  Ivan Apr 14 '11 at 14:21

From python doc (note the leading and trailing aspect):

string.strip(s[, chars]) Return a copy of the string with leading and trailing characters removed. If chars is omitted or None, whitespace characters are removed. If given and not None, chars must be a string; the characters in the string will be stripped from the both ends of the string this method is called on.

Changed in version 2.2.3: The chars parameter was added. The chars parameter cannot be passed in earlier 2.2 versions.

You should take a look at str.replace() and DefaultDict :)

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You want str.translate instead of str.strip.

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Another option is to remove all non-alphabetic characters from the string using filter():

filter(str.isalpha, "Abracadabra, Monsignor")
'AbracadabraMonsignor'

(Be careful using this in your code -- you shadowed the built-in str by a variable of the same name. Never call a variable str.)

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Extending python - Letter Count Dict:

from collections import Counter

def LetterCount(text):
    return Counter(c for c in text.lower() if c.isalpha())
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I don't want to do your homework for you because I don't thik it will help you but I'll try to uide you in the right direction, try this out:

alphabet = map(chr, range(97, 123))

or

alphabet2 = list(string.lowercase)

alphabet and alphabet2 will contain all the lowercase letters in the alphabet in a list.

Thanks eumiro for the remainder!

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2  
You can also use list(string.lowercase), which is a little bit less obscure... –  eumiro Apr 14 '11 at 14:22
    
@eumiro: fair enough, I'm editing! –  Trufa Apr 14 '11 at 14:37

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