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I want to compute scores for some data I have in a MySQL database. The score will be computed as follows:

score = COUNT(purchases MADE BETWEEN NOW() AND (NOW() - 1 WEEK))
  + 0.7 * COUNT(purchases MADE BETWEEN (NOW() - 1 WEEK) AND (NOW() - 2 WEEKS))
  + 0.4 * COUNT(purchases OLDER THAN (NOW() - 2 WEEKS))

I have purchses in a table with a purchase_time column.

Is it possible to do this in MySQL and get output similar to the following?

ORDER_ID    SCORE
   3          8
   4          3
   5          15

Thanks

--- EDIT --- The table structure is:

tblOrder - table
id - primary key
created - time stamp
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can you give structure of your tables and table names? –  Unreason Apr 14 '11 at 14:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your between and older need to be converted into CASE.

CASE case_value
    WHEN when_value THEN statement_list
    [WHEN when_value THEN statement_list] ...
    [ELSE statement_list]
END CASE

At the same time you can rewrite the expression so that specific cases are the factors such as

SELECT SUM(
         CASE DATEDIFF(now(),purchase_datetime) DIV 7
           WHEN 0 THEN 1
           WHEN 1 THEN 0.7
           ELSE 0.4
         END
       )
FROM table
WHERE purchase_datetime < now()
GROUP BY ORDER_ID
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1  
It should be SUM, not COUNT –  Quassnoi Apr 14 '11 at 14:44
    
Of course. edited... Thanks –  Unreason Apr 14 '11 at 14:49
    
@Quassnoi - yes, good spotting. I wondered why it didn't work. Thanks @Unreason, this works and is simpler than UNIONs :-). –  Paul J Apr 14 '11 at 14:52
SELECT  orderId,
        SUM
        (
        CASE
        WHEN purchase_date > NOW() - INTERVAL 1 WEEK AND purchase_date <= NOW() THEN
                1
        WHEN purchase_date > NOW() - INTERVAL 2 WEEK AND purchase_date <= NOW() - INTERVAL 1 WEEK THEN
                0.7
        ELSE
                0.3
        END
        )
FROM    mytable
GROUP BY
        orderId
share|improve this answer
    
+1 you were faster :) However, I propose that my is more optimized as CASE calculation is performed only once (of course it is very minor improvement for I/O bound systems as it only affects CPU utilization, and even that in minor way) –  Unreason Apr 14 '11 at 14:41
    
Ah, it works because it does not use count, only SUM, was misled by the comment above about count, but the sum(1) is a nice alternative for count clever. –  Johan Apr 14 '11 at 14:56
SELECT ORDER ID, COUNT(purchases MADE BETWEEN NOW() AND (NOW() - 1 WEEK))
+ 0.7 * COUNT(purchases MADE BETWEEN (NOW() - 1 WEEK) AND (NOW() - 2 WEEKS))
+ 0.4 * COUNT(purchases OLDER THAN (NOW() - 2 WEEKS)) AS SCORE
FROM TABLE

should do the trick, I don't currently have mysql installed so I can't test it.

also, use datediff to find if a date is between the range of dates

share|improve this answer
2  
no it will not do the trick, COUNT supports only COUNT(expr) and COUNT(DISTINCT expr), see dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/… –  Unreason Apr 14 '11 at 14:29
    
ah, that's correct... I need to read more carefully –  sdm350 Apr 14 '11 at 14:36
SELECT order_id, sum(score) FROM
( 
  (SELECT Order_id, COUNT(id) AS Score FROM purchases 
    WHERE purchase_time BETWEEN CURDATE() AND DATE_SUB(CURDATE(),INTERVAL 1 WEEK))
    GROUP BY order_id
  UNION ALL
    (SELECT Order_id, (COUNT(id) * 0.7) AS score FROM purchases
    WHERE purchase_time BETWEEN DATE_SUB(CURDATE(),INTERVAL 1 WEEK) 
                    AND DATE_SUB(CURDATE(),INTERVAL 2 WEEK))
    GROUP BY order_id 
  UNION ALL
    (SELECT Order_id, (COUNT(id) * 0.4) AS score FROM purchases
    WHERE purchase_time < DATE_SUB(CURDATE(),INTERVAL 2 WEEK)) 
    GROUP BY order_id
) s
GROUP BY order_id;
share|improve this answer
    
Johan, this is generally just wrong approach. No query planner will see that it can get what you ask for in one scan and will do three queries and union them. So, unless there's an index on purchase_time you will have a query that is 3 x slower then it is supposed to be (and three times more complicated). Also, you round things up too early (if rounding is needed at all). –  Unreason Apr 14 '11 at 14:48
    
@Unreason, the union is not pretty I agree, would love to see the solution without a union, fixed the early rounding. –  Johan Apr 14 '11 at 14:52
    
thanks for the effort. I tried this, but couldn't get it to work, and other approaches look more efficient. –  Paul J Apr 14 '11 at 14:53
    
Quassnoi's and mine answers don't use union. @Paul J, this approach would eventually work, just not as efficient. –  Unreason Apr 14 '11 at 15:12

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