Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two sets and I'm trying to do a union (I get the same error when doing an intersection). Here is the error:

error C3892: 'std::_Tree_const_iterator<_Mytree>::operator *' : you cannot assign to a variable that is const

Code snippet(if I comment out the line with the --> then the code compiles and my work around way of doing the union works fine):

    set<Line *>::iterator it;
    set<Line *> * newSet = new set<Line *>();
    leftLines = pLeft->getSet();
    rightLines = pRight->getSet();
 -->it = set_union(leftLines->begin(),leftLines->end(),rightLines->begin(), rightLines->end(), newSet->begin());
    for(it = leftLines->begin(); it != leftLines->end(); it++)
    {
        newSet->insert(*it);
    }
    for(it = rightLines->begin(); it != rightLines->end(); it++)
    {
        newSet->insert(*it);
    }
    it = newSet->begin();
    while(it != newSet->end())
    {
        result->insert(*it);
        it++;
    }

I'm sure this is something silly but I'm kind of lost. I think that code snippet should be enough but I can provide whatever else is needed. Thanks.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is C++, not Java [edit: or .NET]. You almost certainly want to replace (for example):

set<Line *> * newSet = new set<Line *>();

with just:

set<Line *> newSet;

...or, better still, probably just:

set<Line> newSet;

Although it's impossible to say for certain based on the code you've posted, there's a pretty fair chance that your left and right shouldn't be dealing in pointers either -- if they're going to do anything of the sort, a reference probably makes more sense (though, as I said, based on just what you've posted, it's impossible to say for sure).

Once you've done that, you run into a minor problem: a "normal" iterator over a set (or multiset, map or multimap) is really a const_iterator. Once you insert something into an associative container, you're not allowed to change it because that could destroy the collection's invariant (being sorted). If you want to change an existing item, you need to delete if from the contain, make the change, and insert the changed object back into the container. In your case, you're just inserting new items, so you want an insert_iterator.

Since you're not planning on modifying either left or right, you might as well treat them as const as well:

std::set_union(left.cbegin(), left.cend(), 
               right.cbegin(), right.cend(), 
               std::inserter(newSet, newSet.end()));

If you decide to simulate set_union on your own, you can do something like this:

std::set<Line> newSet(left.cbegin(), left.cend());  
std::copy(right.cbegin(), right.cend(), std::inserter(newSet, newSet.end()));

Edit:

Instead of passing around pointers to containers, you normally want to pass around iterators into the containers. For example, to print out the contents, you apparently now have something like:

void print_data(std::vector<Line *> const *data) { 
     for (int i=0; i<data->size(); i++)
         std::cout << *(*data)[i] << "\n";
}

It probably has more formatting and such, but for the moment we'll ignore those details and assume it's this simple. To write the data directly from a container of your choice, you normally want a template that will accept iterators of an arbitrary type:

template <class inIt>
void print_data(inIt begin, inIt end) { 
     while (begin != end) 
         std::cout << *begin++ << '\n';
}

We can, however, go a step further than that, and specify the output as an iterator as well:

template <class inIt, class outIt>
void print_data(inIt begin, inIt end, outIt dest) { 
    while (begin != end) {
        *dest++ = *begin++;
        *dest++ = '\n';
    }
}

You could go one more step, and allow the user to specify the delimiter to be used between the items, instead of always using '\n', but at that point, you'd just be duplicating something what's already in the standard library -- a combination of std::copy and an std::ostream_iterator, which is how you probably want to deal with this in reality:

std::copy(newSet.begin(), newSet.end(), 
          std::ostream_iterator<Line>(std::cout, "\n"));

Note, however, that as far as the standard library cares, an ostream_iterator is just another iterator. If you're just going to print out the union of left and right, you can skip even creating a set to hold that union, and just print it out directly:

std::set_union(left.cbegin(), left.cend(),
               right.cbegin(), right.cend(), 
               std::ostream_iterator<Line>(std::cout, "\n"));

The fact that an ostream_iterator writes to a file instead of putting things into a normal collection is entirely irrelevant to the standard library. It has a few classes of iterators, and can write output to any iterator that models the correct class.

Now, I may be jumping the gun, so to speak -- maybe need to do other processing on the data before you write it to the console. My point isn't that you necessarily have to write the union directly to standard output, but just that you don't necessarily have to write it to some other collection before you print it out.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm using pointers everywhere because I'm passing the sets around between functions a few times. If I can get away with not using pointers I would much prefer that. The left and right sets are obtained through a function call, then I need to perform the union/intersection on them and return the results to another place which then converts the set to a vector<Line *>, returns that and finally its output to the console. –  Pete Apr 14 '11 at 17:05
    
You should generally pass around iterators to the containers, rather than (pointers|references to) the containers themselves. Why are you converting from set to vector before doing output? You do realize you can copy directly from the set to cout, right? –  Jerry Coffin Apr 14 '11 at 17:08
    
I need it to be in a vector because the function that does the printing expects a vector. In C# I could pass in an IEnumerable and the actual type doesn't matter. Is there a similar facility in C++? How can I define a function that would take anything that I can iterate over (like a vector or set)? I'm also completely lost on the idea of passing around the iterators instead of the containers. How does that even work? –  Pete Apr 14 '11 at 17:20
    
@Pete: See edited answer. –  Jerry Coffin Apr 14 '11 at 17:23
add comment

set iterators aren't output iterators. Use this:

set_union(leftLines->begin(),leftLines->end(),rightLines->begin(), rightLines->end(), inserter(*newSet, newSet->begin()));

Also, why're you filling newSet? Leave it as is after the union/intersection or the union/intersection will be pointless.

set<Line *>::iterator it;
set<Line *> newSet; // No need to `new` this
leftLines = pLeft->getSet();
rightLines = pRight->getSet();
set_union(leftLines->begin(),leftLines->end(),rightLines->begin(), rightLines->end(), inserter(newSet, newSet.begin()));

// Assuming you really need the below code - you could likely just make an inserter directly on `result` instead of the copying.
it = newSet.begin();
while(it != newSet.end())
{
    result->insert(*it);
    it++;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I do need the results of the union stores in result. That code is in a function that returns a set. Is there a better way than the while loop? –  Pete Apr 14 '11 at 15:08
    
@Pete: you could just do result->clear() and then set_union(... inserter(*result, result->begin()) to get the union stored directly in result. –  Erik Apr 14 '11 at 15:09
    
Just a nit, but inserter(*newSet, newSet->end()) will give better performance when inserting sorted input. I find it also more intuitive (if you can call any of this intuitive); the "hint" should be an iterator to the element which will end up after the inserted element. –  James Kanze Apr 14 '11 at 15:58
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.