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I can't believe this question hasn't been asked before. I have a string that needs to be inserted into an HTML file but it may contain special HTML characters. I want to replace these with the appropriate HTML representation.

The code below works but is pretty verbose and ugly. Performance is not critical for my application but I guess there are scalability problems here also. How can I improve this? I guess this is a job for STL algorithms or some esoteric Boost function, but the code below is the best I can come up with myself.

void escape(std::string *data)
{
    std::string::size_type pos = 0;
    for (;;)
    {
        pos = data->find_first_of("\"&<>", pos);
        if (pos == std::string::npos) break;
        std::string replacement;
        switch ((*data)[pos])
        {
        case '\"': replacement = "&quot;"; break;   
        case '&':  replacement = "&amp;";  break;   
        case '<':  replacement = "&lt;";   break;   
        case '>':  replacement = "&gt;";   break;   
        default: ;
        }
        data->replace(pos, 1, replacement);
        pos += replacement.size();
    };
}
share|improve this question
1  
Do you really need to replace quotes? I though they were valid XML (I'd replace \n and \r too). –  Giovanni Funchal Apr 14 '11 at 15:13
    
Yes, that's a different question and a good one. Which characters need replacing? –  paperjam Apr 14 '11 at 15:19
    
Indeed :-) check this stackoverflow.com/questions/1091945/… –  Giovanni Funchal Apr 14 '11 at 15:23
    
@Gionvanni: depends on context. If the string is being pasted into the middle of an attribute value, like tag = "<select value=\"" + escaped(value) + "\">", then quotes need to be escaped. If it's being pasted outside any tag, like element = "<p>" + escaped(value) + "</p>", then quotes don't need to be escaped but, assuming the output is destined for an HTML or XML parser, it doesn't do any harm to escape them. &apos; is a valid entity in HTML but not XML. –  Steve Jessop Apr 14 '11 at 16:25

6 Answers 6

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Instead of just replacing in the original string, you can do copying with on-the-fly replacement which avoids having to move characters in the string. This will have much better complexity and cache behavior, so I'd expect a huge improvement. Or you can use boost::spirit::xml encode or http://code.google.com/p/pugixml/.

void encode(std::string& data) {
    std::string buffer;
    buffer.reserve(data.size());
    for(size_t pos = 0; pos != data.size(); ++pos) {
        switch(data[pos]) {
            case '&':  buffer.append("&amp;");       break;
            case '\"': buffer.append("&quot;");      break;
            case '\'': buffer.append("&apos;");      break;
            case '<':  buffer.append("&lt;");        break;
            case '>':  buffer.append("&gt;");        break;
            default:   buffer.append(&data[pos], 1); break;
        }
    }
    data.swap(buffer);
}

EDIT: A small improvement can be achieved by using an heuristic to determine the size of the buffer. Replace the buffer.reserve line with data.size()*1.1 (10%) or something similar depending of how much replacements are expected.

share|improve this answer
    
True, unless replacements are rare. Thanks for the links too but I don't think either is practical to use. –  paperjam Apr 14 '11 at 15:16
1  
Ah, did you know you can also use CDATA? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CDATA –  Giovanni Funchal Apr 14 '11 at 15:27
    
I didn't know about CDATA but it looks like web browsers don't respect it in HTML. –  paperjam Apr 14 '11 at 15:30
    
If it is HTML that you want to escape, it might be much harder than simple XML. You might need a heavyweight library if you want the encoded string to be protected against weird characters. Check this: site.icu-project.org –  Giovanni Funchal Apr 14 '11 at 15:33
    
I'm using ASCII so surely there are only around 100 characters to consider and only a few of these might cause problems? –  paperjam Apr 14 '11 at 15:37
void escape(std::string *data)
{
    using boost::algorithm::replace_all;
    replace_all(*data, "&",  "&amp;");
    replace_all(*data, "\"", "&quot;");
    replace_all(*data, "\'", "&apos;");
    replace_all(*data, "<",  "&lt;");
    replace_all(*data, ">",  "&gt;");
}

Could win the prize for least verbose?

share|improve this answer
3  
Care for the order, you should start with "&" :-) –  Giovanni Funchal Apr 14 '11 at 15:14
1  
If you just want to get the job done, definitely the most robust way to go. Encoding ASCII text HTML, though, it should be enough to quote &, < and >. You don't need to quote quotation marks if the text is not going into a node attribute. –  Antti Huima Apr 14 '11 at 15:49
2  
Your implementation should also win the prize for worst performing, as it will encode an N-long string of ampersands/quotes/etc. in O(N^2) complexity. –  vladr Mar 18 '14 at 19:25

I'd honestly go with a more generic version using iterators, such that you can "stream" the encoding. Consider the following implementation:

#include <algorithm>

namespace xml {

    // Helper for null-terminated ASCII strings (no end of string iterator).
    template<typename InIter, typename OutIter>
    OutIter copy_asciiz ( InIter begin, OutIter out )
    {
        while ( *begin != '\0' ) {
            *out++ = *begin++;
        }
        return (out);
    }

    // XML escaping in it's general form.  Note that 'out' is expected
    // to an "infinite" sequence.
    template<typename InIter, typename OutIter>
    OutIter escape ( InIter begin, InIter end, OutIter out )
    {
        static const char bad[] = "&<>";
        static const char* rep[] = {"&amp;", "&lt;", "&gt;"};
        static const std::size_t n = sizeof(bad)/sizeof(bad[0]);

        for ( ; (begin != end); ++begin )
        {
            // Find which replacement to use.
            const std::size_t i =
                std::distance(bad, std::find(bad, bad+n, *begin));

            // No need for escaping.
            if ( i == n ) {
                *out++ = *begin;
            }
            // Escape the character.
            else {
                out = copy_asciiz(rep[i], out);
            }
        }
        return (out);
    }

}

Then, you can simplify the average case using a few overloads:

#include <iterator>
#include <string>

namespace xml {

    // Get escaped version of "content".
    std::string escape ( const std::string& content )
    {
        std::string result;
        result.reserve(content.size());
        escape(content.begin(), content.end(), std::back_inserter(result));
        return (result);
    }

    // Escape data on the fly, using "constant" memory.
    void escape ( std::istream& in, std::ostream& out )
    {
        escape(std::istreambuf_iterator<char>(in),
            std::istreambuf_iterator<char>(),
            std::ostreambuf_iterator<char>(out));
    }

}

Finally, test the whole lot:

#include <iostream>

int main ( int, char ** )
{
    std::cout << xml::escape("<foo>bar & qux</foo>") << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer

If you're going for processing speed, then it seems to me that the best would be to have a second string that you build as you go, copying from the first string to the second string, and then appending the html escapes as you encounter them. Since I assume that the replace method involves first a memory move, followed by a copy into the replaced position, it's going to be very slow for large strings. If you have a second string to build using .append(), it will avoid the memory move.

As far was code "cleanness", I think that's about as pretty as you're going to get. You could create an array of characters and their replacements, and then search the array, but that would probably be slower and not much cleaner anyway.

share|improve this answer

Here is a simple ~30 line C program that does the trick in a rather good manner. Here I am assuming that the temp_str will have allocated memory enough to have the additional escaped characters.

void toExpatEscape(char *temp_str)
{
    const char cEscapeChars[6]={'&','\'','\"','>','<','\0'};
    const char * const pEscapedSeqTable[] =
    {
        "&amp;",
        "&apos;",
        "&quot;",
        "&gt;",
        "&lt;",
    };
    unsigned int i, j, k, nRef = 0, nEscapeCharsLen = strlen(cEscapeChars), str_len = strlen(temp_str);
    int nShifts = 0; 

    for (i=0; i<str_len; i++)
    {
        for(nRef=0; nRef<nEscapeCharsLen; nRef++)
        {
            if(temp_str[i] == cEscapeChars[nRef])
            {
                if((nShifts = strlen(pEscapedSeqTable[nRef]) - 1) > 0)
                {
                    memmove(temp_str+i+nShifts, temp_str+i, str_len-i+nShifts); 
                    for(j=i,k=0; j<=i+nShifts,k<=nShifts; j++,k++)
                        temp_str[j] = pEscapedSeqTable[nRef][k];
                    str_len += nShifts;
                }
            }
        }  
    }
    temp_str[str_len] = '\0';
}
share|improve this answer

Or with just stl :

 std::string& rep(std::string &s, std::string from, std::string to)
    {
      int pos = -1;
      while ( (pos = s.find(from, pos+1) ) != string::npos)
        s.erase(pos, from.length()).insert(pos, to);

      return s;
    }

Usage:

rep(s, "&", "&quot;");
rep(s, "\"", "&quot;");

or:

rep(s, "HTML","xxxx");
share|improve this answer
1  
Don't pass strings by copy. –  Giovanni Funchal Apr 18 '11 at 14:02
    
@Giovanni: ??!!?.. –  etipici Apr 19 '11 at 6:39
    
The from and to strings are being passed by copy. Use a const& instead. Also, chaining erase and insert in a loop that executes find is very bad for performance because strings are contiguous arrays. You are potentially at O(n^3). –  Giovanni Funchal Apr 19 '11 at 7:02

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