Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This should hopefully be an easy question. I haven't dealt much with enums, so I don't fully understand how they work. In my program I'm trying to store a player's job in an enum. I need the functionality that the job can be changed. I'm trying to use a switch statement, but it isn't changing the player's job.

Code:

// if change is True, change the job. If false, simply return the current value
int GameModeState::changeJob(bool change)
{
    int job = Landman; // Default job is landman
    if (change == true)
    {
        switch(job)
        {
        case Landman:
            return job;
            break;
        case Geologist:
            return job;
            break;
        default:
            job = Landman;
            return job;
            break;
        }
    } 
    else 
    {
        return job;
    }
}

// when the player opens the stat sheet, it should change their job
void GameModeState::_statsheet()
 {
     changeJob(true);
 }

What am I doing wrong to have the jobs change? I'm thinking the problem is in the switch statement.

share|improve this question
1  
What do you mean by "it isn't changing"? You're returning different values of job, but then ignoring the return value. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 14 '11 at 15:11
2  
What is the faulty behaviour? Here I just see that you always assign job to Landman. –  M'vy Apr 14 '11 at 15:11
    
I don't know how to return the new value of job... that is, I don't know what my switch statement is doing... I want it to return the new job, but apparently my "default" is overtaking it? –  Briz Apr 14 '11 at 15:13
    
No matter what, you are just returning Landman. What's the purpose of switch statement, if each case is returning the same value ? –  Mahesh Apr 14 '11 at 15:14
    
@mahesh How do I not "no matter what" return Landman? I just want Landman to be the default if they do not select a job at the beginning of the game. –  Briz Apr 14 '11 at 15:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your logic is wrong. The switch(job) statement brings you into your case statement. In the

case Landman

You immediately return Landman (because you set job to Landman before executing your switch statement, it will ALWAYS return Landman the way you have it coded), which returns you from this function completely. It never attempts to change job to any OTHER job. Note that your break statements are also never executed, as the return immediately returns you from this function call. You probably want this:

case Landman:
   job = geologist;
   return job;

So on and so forth. Futhermore, you are hard coding the default job case to Landman. You probably want to either pass as a variable, or read out of an object, what the CURRENT value of Job is on the player sheet, and then adjust it based on it's current value.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi J_D, again. What logic do I need to use, then, to switch the jobs? –  Briz Apr 14 '11 at 15:16
    
I'll try this in my code and let you know how it goes. –  Briz Apr 14 '11 at 15:17
    
See my edit - You need to read the current value of job from the player sheet. Then, use that in your switch statement. switch(currentJob).. Then, if you hit case geologist, you change your characterSheet.job to Landman. You don't seem to be actually capturing and storing this job value anywhere, and you aren't storing the return value of your function in the _statSheet() call. You need to either capture the return value, or have the function directly update your statSheet object in memory so that the change is perpetuated. –  J_D Apr 14 '11 at 15:20
    
This has gotten me started in the right direction. I'll have my boyfriend help me finish up. Thanks J_D! –  Briz Apr 14 '11 at 15:39

The switch statement is fine. You've got a bunch of useless break statements, but there not causing problems (except making the code less readable).

This is the problem:

// if change is True, change the job. If false, simply return the current value

job is a local variable, the only effect of setting it is the later return job; statement. Your comment should read:

// if change is true, return the new job. If false, simply return the current value

The new value of job IS returned, but you discard the return value.

Of course, you're always setting job = Landman, which means you always take the same path through the switch. The whole function is equivalent to return Landman;.

share|improve this answer
    
Eh, how would I return the new job? ;_; –  Briz Apr 14 '11 at 15:11
    
@Briz: You are probably looking for a member variable, initialized in the constructor and then used in other functions. But it isn't clear what you want to do because you haven't described it, all you provided was code that does what you don't want. –  Ben Voigt Apr 14 '11 at 15:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.