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I'm working on a C/C++ app (in Visual Studio 2010) where I need to tokenize a comma delimited string and I would like this to be as fast as possible. Currently I'm using strtok_s. I ran some tests of strtok_s versus sscanf and it seemed like strtok_s was faster (unless I wrote a terrible implementation :) ) but I was wondering if anyone could suggest a faster alternative.

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In C, I don't think you can find a faster alternative to strtok() (or even strtok_s() -- whatever that is). If strtok() suits you, use it. –  pmg Apr 14 '11 at 15:53
6  
Nitpick: There's no such language called "C/C++." Is it C or C++? They are different. –  John Dibling Apr 14 '11 at 15:59
    
Thanks for the fast answers guys, initially I had the same train of thought as pmg. To be thorough however I am going to prototype these answers and then time them and I will post the results for future reference. –  mmhmm Apr 14 '11 at 16:00
2  
The best practices for many things are different between C and C++. If you're working in one, you want the best practice for that language. If you're working in both, you probably want two different best practices. –  David Thornley Apr 14 '11 at 16:51
    
@David ya exactly, I was basically trying to ask what these are and which is the fastest. I am just curious to compare them since both options are available to me and the bottom line is I need it to be as fast as possible. I will post results later thx :) –  mmhmm Apr 14 '11 at 18:01

5 Answers 5

For sheer runtime speed, boost.spirit.qi is an excellent candidate.

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The best you can do is to make sure you go through the string only once, and build the output on the fly. Start pulling off chars in to a temp buffer, and when you encounter the delimiter save the temp buffer to the output collection, clear the temp buffer, rinse and repeat.

Here's a basic implementation that does this.

template<class C=char>
struct basic_token
{
    typedef std::basic_string<C> token_string;
    typedef unsigned long size_type;
    token_string token_, delim_;
    basic_token(const token_string& token, const token_string& delim = token_string());
};

template<class C>
basic_token<C>::basic_token(const token_string& token, const token_string& delim)
:   token_(token),
    delim_(delim)
{
}

typedef basic_token<char> token;

template<class Char, class Iter> void tokenize(const std::basic_string<Char>& line, const Char* delims, Iter itx)
{
    typedef basic_token<Char> Token;
    typedef std::basic_string<Char> TString;

    for( TString::size_type tok_begin = 0, tok_end = line.find_first_of(delims, tok_begin);
        tok_begin != TString::npos; tok_end = line.find_first_of(delims, tok_begin) )
    {
        if( tok_end == TString::npos )
        {
            (*itx++) = Token(TString(&line[tok_begin]));
            tok_begin = tok_end;
        }
        else
        {
            (*itx++) = Token(TString(&line[tok_begin], &line[tok_end]), TString(1, line[tok_end]));
            tok_begin = tok_end + 1;
        }
    }
}

template<class Char, class Iter> void tokenize(const Char* line, const Char* delim, Iter itx)
{
    tokenize(std::basic_string<Char>(line), delim, itx);
}
template<class Stream, class Token> Stream& operator<<(Stream& os, const Token& tok)
{
    os << tok.token_ << "\t[" << tok.delim_ << "]";
    return os;
}

...which you would use like this:

string raw = "35=BW|49=TEST|1346=REQ22|1355=2|1182=88500|1183=88505|10=087^";
vector<stoken> tokens;
tokenize(raw, "|", back_inserter(tokens));
copy(tokens.begin(), tokens.end(), ostream_iterator<stoken>(cout, "\n"));

Output is:

35=BW   [|]
49=TEST [|]
1346=REQ22      [|]
1355=2  [|]
1182=88500      [|]
1183=88505      [|]
10=087^ []
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I would remind you that there is a risk with strtok and its ilk that you can get back a different number of tokens than you might want.

one|two|three  would yield 3 tokens

while

one|||three    would yield 2.
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The test of mmhmm haven't make use of spirit correctly, his grammars are flaw.

#include <cstdio> 
#include <cstring>   

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

#include <boost/fusion/include/adapt_struct.hpp>
#include <boost/fusion/include/io.hpp>

#include <boost/spirit/include/qi.hpp>    

/****************************strtok_r************************/
typedef struct sTokenDataC {
    char *time;
    char *symb;
    float bid;
    float ask;
    int bidSize;
    int askSize;
} tokenDataC;

tokenDataC parseTick( char *line, char *parseBuffer )
{
    tokenDataC tokenDataOut;

    tokenDataOut.time = strtok_r( line,",", &parseBuffer );
    tokenDataOut.symb = strtok_r( nullptr,",", &parseBuffer );
    tokenDataOut.bid = atof(strtok_r( nullptr,",", &parseBuffer ));
    tokenDataOut.ask = atof(strtok_r( nullptr , ",", &parseBuffer ));
    tokenDataOut.bidSize = atoi(strtok_r( nullptr,",", &parseBuffer ));
    tokenDataOut.askSize = atoi(strtok_r( nullptr, ",", &parseBuffer  ));

    return tokenDataOut;
}

void test_strcpy_s(int iteration)
{
    char *testStringC = new char[64];
    char *lineBuffer = new char[64];

    printf("test_strcpy_s....\n");
    strcpy(testStringC,"09:30:00,TEST,13.24,15.32,10,14");
    {
        timeEstimate<> es;
        tokenDataC tokenData2;
        for(int i = 0; i < iteration; i++)
        {
            strcpy(lineBuffer, testStringC);//this is more realistic since this has to happen because I want to preserve the line
            tokenData2 = parseTick(lineBuffer, testStringC);
            //std::cout<<*tokenData2.time<<", "<<*tokenData2.symb<<",";
            //std::cout<<tokenData2.bid<<", "<<tokenData2.ask<<", "<<tokenData2.bidSize<<", "<<tokenData2.askSize<<std::endl;
        }
    }

    delete[] lineBuffer;
    delete[] testStringC;
}
/****************************strtok_r************************/

/****************************spirit::qi*********************/
namespace qi = boost::spirit::qi;

struct tokenDataCPP
{
    std::string time;
    std::string symb;
    float bid;
    float ask;
    int bidSize;
    int askSize;

    void clearTimeSymb(){
        time.clear();
        symb.clear();
    }
};

BOOST_FUSION_ADAPT_STRUCT(
        tokenDataCPP,
        (std::string, time)
        (std::string, symb)
        (float, bid)
        (float, ask)
        (int, bidSize)
        (int, askSize)
        )

void test_spirit_qi(int iteration)
{
    std::string const strs("09:30:00,TEST,13.24,15.32,10,14");
    tokenDataCPP data;        

    auto myString = *~qi::char_(",");
    auto parser = myString >> "," >> myString >> "," >> qi::float_ >> "," >> qi::float_ >> "," >> qi::int_  >> "," >> qi::int_;
    {
        std::cout<<("test_spirit_qi....\n");
        timeEstimate<> es;
        for(int i = 0; i < iteration; ++i){
            qi::parse(std::begin(strs), std::end(strs), parser, data);
            //std::cout<<data.time<<", "<<data.symb<<", ";
            //std::cout<<data.bid<<", "<<data.ask<<", "<<data.bidSize<<", "<<data.askSize<<std::endl;
            data.clearTimeSymb();
        }
    }
}
/****************************spirit::qi*********************/

int main()
{
    int const ITERATIONS = 500 * 10000;
    test_strcpy_s(ITERATIONS);
    test_spirit_qi(ITERATIONS);
}

Since clang++ don't have strtok_s, I use strtok_r to replace it Iterate 500 * 10k, the times are

  • test_strcpy_s : 1.40951
  • test_spirit_qi : 1.34277

Their times are almost the same, not much different.

compiler, clang++ 3.2, -O2

codes of timeEstime

auto is a good way to lower the complexity of spirit, after c++14 release, we could have a much better return type deduction and prefer to encapsulate the rules inside the function.

auto tokenCppParser()
{
   auto myString = *~qi::char_(",");
   auto parser = myString >> "," >> myString >> "," >> qi::float_ >> "," >> qi::float_ >> "," >> qi::int_  >> "," >> qi::int_;

   return parser;
}

no struct, no inheritance, don't need to declare the rules by hand again.

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After testing and timing each suggested candidate, the result is that strtok is clearly the fastest. Although I'm not surprised my love of testing dictated it was worth exploring other options. [Note: Code was thrown together edits welcome :) ]

Given:

typedef struct sTokenDataC {
    char *time;
    char *symb; 
    float bid;
    float ask;
    int bidSize;
    int askSize;
} tokenDataC;

tokenDataC parseTick( char *line, char *parseBuffer )
{
    tokenDataC tokenDataOut;

    tokenDataOut.time = strtok_s( line,",", &parseBuffer );
    tokenDataOut.symb = strtok_s( null,",", &parseBuffer );
    tokenDataOut.bid = atof(strtok_s( null,",", &parseBuffer ));
    tokenDataOut.ask = atof(strtok_s( null , ",", &parseBuffer ));
    tokenDataOut.bidSize = atoi(strtok_s( null,",", &parseBuffer ));
    tokenDataOut.askSize = atoi(strtok_s( null, ",", &parseBuffer  ));

    return tokenDataOut; 
}

char *testStringC = new char[64];
    strcpy(testStringC,"09:30:00,TEST,13.24,15.32,10,14");

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
char *lineBuffer = new char[64];
    printf("Testing method2....\n");
    for(int i = 0; i < ITERATIONS; i++)
    {
        strcpy(lineBuffer,testStringC);//this is more realistic since this has to happen because I want to preserve the line
        tokenData2 = parseTick(lineBuffer,parseBuffer);

    }
}

vs calling John Diblings impl via:

    struct sTokenDataCPP
    {
        std::basic_string<char> time;
        std::basic_string<char> symb; 
        float bid;
        float ask;
        int bidSize;
        int askSize;
    };
        std::vector<myToken> tokens1;
            tokenDataCPP tokenData;
            printf("Testing method1....\n");
            for(int i = 0; i < ITERATIONS; i++)
            {
tokens1.clear();
                tokenize(raw, ",", std::back_inserter(tokens1));

                tokenData.time.assign(tokens1.at(0).token_);
                tokenData.symb.assign(tokens1.at(1).token_);
                tokenData.ask = atof(tokens1.at(2).token_.c_str());
                tokenData.bid = atof(tokens1.at(3).token_.c_str());
                tokenData.askSize = atoi(tokens1.at(4).token_.c_str());
                tokenData.bidSize = atoi(tokens1.at(5).token_.c_str());

            }

vs a simple boost.spirit.qi implementation defining the grammer as follows:

template <typename Iterator>
struct tick_parser : grammar<Iterator, tokenDataCPP(), boost::spirit::ascii::space_type>
{

    tick_parser() : tick_parser::base_type(start)
    {
        my_string %= lexeme[+(boost::spirit::ascii::char_ ) ];

        start %=
            my_string >> ','
            >>  my_string >> ','
            >>  float_ >> ','
            >>  float_ >> ','
            >>  int_ >> ','
            >>  int_
            ;
    }

    rule<Iterator, std::string(), boost::spirit::ascii::space_type> my_string;
    rule<Iterator, sTokenDataCPP(), boost::spirit::ascii::space_type> start;
};

with ITERATIONS set to 500k: strtok version: 2s john's version: 115s boost: 172s

I can post the full code is people want this, I just didn't want to take up a huge amt of space

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Roll your own version of strtok() based on strchr() for an even faster version. You can make the prototype simpler: char *strtokchr(char *src, int ch);; you don't need to code for several "break" characters; maybe you can deal with successive "break" characters differently ... –  pmg Apr 15 '11 at 17:34
    
@pmg nice, ill try that –  mmhmm Apr 15 '11 at 17:51
    
@pmg wrote a function based on strchr that wrote directly to my target struct and was able to do 1 mill iterations in 1 sec. awesome thx :) –  mmhmm Apr 15 '11 at 19:56
    
YAY! Nice. But don't name that function like I did in my previous comment. That identifier starts with str and a lowercase letter so it's reserved for the implementation. Try chrstrtok :) –  pmg Apr 15 '11 at 20:24
1  
Your codes can't run, especially tye grammar of spirit, it is impossible to compile.1 : namespace error--you didn't add namespace before your rules; 2 : the synthesis attribute of the struct and the "start" rule should be the same type. 3 : the grammar of the spirit is not doing the same thing as strtok_s. 4 : your grammar is buggy, it would parse all of the chars but not the pattern you want.Conclusion : test your results carefully before you post your results –  StereoMatching Oct 24 '13 at 3:41

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