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I have an Access database. I would like to automatically query the table Data_01 and export the results to an Excel spreadsheet using ADO in VBScript on a daily basis. At present my skills in ADO are lacking.

  1. I have a date time column that I would select items from yesterday and today. In a GUI query the criteria would be Between Date() And Date()-1
  2. I have a PartNumber column that I would like select a specific part number. In a GUI query the criteria would be Series 400
  3. I would then like to select other columns based on the criteria in items 1. and 2.
  4. I would like to get the header row for the columns also.

I am presently exporting the entire table to Excel and then using a VBScript to select the columns that I want and then deleting all unwanted data, then auto-fitting the columns for my final output file. This appears to be somewhat processor- and time intensive.

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4 Answers 4

Have you tried the built in functions in Excel for importing data? I don't have a English language version of Excel, so I won't guide you to them, but I think the menu is called "Data".

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My first reaction is to do the following:

  1. Create a query object in MS Access that finds the data you want to export [Database Window -> Queries -> New (use the GUI builder for now)]
  2. Create a macro that exports the query to an Excel file. I talk more about that here. You could do this in VBA as well... many would say that was more "pure" (I have macros as well); but whatever floats your boat.
  3. Set up an autoexec macro (this will run automatically when the MS Access opens) that runs the export macro you just created and then exits MS Access (you can override this my holding down the shift key while Access is loading). It would be slightly better to also create a separate MS Access file to preform these operations without affecting the original MS Access file, just by creating table links to the original.
  4. Set up a Scheduled Task to open the MS Access file once a day.
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I actually have 30 different automated manufacturing machines that are creating similar indivdual databases on a rollover basis. They overwrite after 24,000 records. I have one hour downtime per day in the middle of the night to snapshot all of them and process the days data. –  Nat Feb 19 '09 at 19:43
    
That's simply an issue of scale and scripting the harvesting of data from all 30 AMMs. –  CodeSlave Feb 19 '09 at 21:06

Here is some sample VBScript

Dim cn 
Dim rs

strFile = "C:\Docs\LTD.mdb"

strCon = "Provider=Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0;Data Source=" & strFile & ";"

Set cn = CreateObject("ADODB.Connection")
Set rs = CreateObject("ADODB.Recordset")

cn.Open strCon

strSQL = "SELECT * FROM tblTable " _
& "WHERE CrDate Between Now() And Date()-1 " _
& "AND OtherField='abc' " _
& "AND PartNumber=1 " _
& "ORDER BY CrDate, PartNumber"

rs.Open strSQL, cn

Set xl = CreateObject("Excel.Application")
Set xlBk = xl.Workbooks.Add

With xlbk.Worksheets(1)
    For i = 0 To rs.Fields.Count - 1
        .Cells(1, i + 1) = rs.Fields(i).Name
    Next

    .Cells(2, 1).CopyFromRecordset rs
    .Columns("B:B").NumberFormat = "m/d/yy h:mm"
End With

xl.Visible=True
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If you don't have Excel you can access an xls with ADO like this


Const adOpenStatic = 3
Const adLockOptimistic = 3
Const adCmdText = &H0001
Const strDB = "" 'Location of Database file
Const strXLS = "" 'Location of spreadsheet


Set objAccessConnection = CreateObject("ADODB.Connection")
objAccessConnection.Open "Provider=Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0;Persist Security Info=False;Data Source=" & strDB
Set objExcelConnection = CreateObject("ADODB.Connection")
objExcelConnection.Open "Provider=Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0;Data Source=" & strXLS & ";Extended Properties=""Excel 8.0;HDR=Yes;"";"
Set objAccessRecordset = CreateObject("ADODB.Recordset")
Set objExcelRecordSet = CreateObject("ADODB.Recordset")

strAccessQuery = "SELECT * FROM Data_01 WHERE PartNumberColumn = 'Series 400' AND DateColumn BETWEEN #" & Date -1 & "# AND #" & Date & "#"
objAccessRecordset.Open strAccessQuery, objAccessConnection, adOpenStatic, adLockOptimistic

strTable = "Sheet1$"
objExcelRecordSet.Open "Select * FROM [" & strTable & "]", objExcelConnection, adOpenStatic, adLockOptimistic, adCmdText

Do Until objAccessRecordset.EOF
   objExcelRecordSet.AddNew
   For i = 0 To objAccessRecordSet.Fields.Count - 1
       objExcelRecordset.Fields(i).Value = objAccessRecordset.Fields(i).Value
   Next
   objExcelRecordSet.Update
   objAccessRecordset.MoveNext
Loop

objExcelRecordset.Close
Set objExcelRecordset = Nothing
objAccessRecordset.Close
Set objAccessRecordset = Nothing
objAccessConnection.Close
Set objAccessConnection = Nothing

The only thing to watch out for is to make sure the columns in the spreadsheet have a title in the first row, otherwise this script could fail.

EDIT:
you could also write the recordset to a .csv file.


Const adClipString = 2
Const ForWriting = 2
Const ForAppending = 8
Const strDB = "C:\Test.mdb"
Const strCSV = "C:\Test.csv"


Set objAccessConnection = CreateObject("ADODB.Connection")
objAccessConnection.Open "Provider=Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0;Persist Security Info=False;Data Source=" & strDB

Set objAccessRecordset = CreateObject("ADODB.Recordset")

strAccessQuery = "SELECT * FROM Data_01 WHERE PartNumber = 'Series 400' AND TheDate BETWEEN #" & Date -1 & "# AND #" & Date & "#"
objAccessRecordset.Open strAccessQuery, objAccessConnection, adOpenStatic, adLockOptimistic

Set objCSV = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject").OpenTextFile(strCSV, ForAppending, True)
objCSV.Write objAccessRecordset.GetString(adClipString,,",",CRLF)

objCSV.Close
Set objCSV = Nothing
objAccessRecordset.Close
Set objAccessRecordset = Nothing
objAccessConnection.Close
Set objAccessConnection = Nothing

Excel will open .csv files with no problem. The downside of this method is Excel does not do well with saving .csv files, but in excel the csv file can be saved as an xls.

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