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I just did the following:

var items =
    from c in Items
    where 
            c.Pid == Campaigns.Where(d=>d.Campaign_name=="US - Autos.com").First().Pid
        &&  c.Affid == Affiliates.Where(e=>e.Add_code=="CD4729").First().Affid
    select c;

Then I want to update a field for all the results:

items.ToList().ForEach(c=>c.Cost_per_unit=8);  
SubmitChanges();

When querying, I know I can use:

GetCommand(items);

To see the SQL that will be executed.

But on submitting changes, I don't know how to do that.

I looked at:

GetChangeSet()

And I see that there are about 18 updates in this case.

QUESTION 1: are there efficiency issues using L2S to update this way?

QUESTION 2 (maybe this should be a separate question but I'll try it here): is there a general way to just monitor the SQL statements that go to SQL Server 2008 R2? I guess I could disable all but TCP for the instance and WireShark the port (if the stuff is even readable), but I'm hoping there's an easier way.

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1  
2: yes, SQL Server Profiler. It's in your start menu under SQL Server, Performance tools. It shows all statements on all sessions though by default but you can filter your own out. –  Rup Apr 14 '11 at 16:38
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3 Answers

The DataContext has a Log property that you can hook into to dump the executed SQL. There is also Linq To Sql Profiler which is awesome.

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When querying, I know I can use:

GetCommand(items); To see the SQL that will be executed.

But on submitting changes, I don't know how to do that.

You may be able to use this:

yourContext.Log = Console.Out;

But I'm not certain if this logs all SQL or just selects.

Your SQL is different for each affected object. L2S will use dependencies to determine the order in which objects must be saved (if the order is important), then will construct SQL insert, update, and delete statements to persist the changes. The generated statements (especially for update) are dependent upon which properties of the object have changed. There is no way in particular to view the entire batch that will be executed.

QUESTION 1: are there efficiency issues using L2S to update this way?

No, this is how any other automated data access layer would perform updates.

QUESTION 2 (maybe this should be a separate question but I'll try it here): is there a general way to just monitor the SQL statements that go to SQL Server 2008 R2? I disable all but TCP for the instance and WireShark the port, but I'm hoping there's an easier way.

This should be another question, but the answer is to use a trace. While you can trace with any version of SQL Server (including Express), the SQL Server Profiler tool that comes with all versions other than Express makes this very easy to do. If you want more information on this, feel free to ask another question with your specific issues.

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Regarding efficiency - Of course there are more efficient ways of performing the update as it exists in your question; For example, a SQL query like this would be much more efficient (there would not be a SELECT query executed, code executed to pull the data from SQL into a set of objects, code executed to perform the update on the objects, code executed to determine which objects changed, code executed to generate the appropriate SQL statements, and UPDATE queries executed on the SQL server):

UPDATE Items SET Cost_per_unit = @CostPerUnit
FROM Items
    JOIN Campaigns ON ...
    JOIN Affiliates ON ...
WHERE ...

But Linq to SQL doesn't provide any way of building such a query. If you are going to be updating thousands of rows in a very simple way similar to your question, you may be better off running a SQL statement like this instead. If there aren't going to be that many rows updated or if the logic is more complicated, then keep it in Linq to SQL.

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