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I have a script that's successfully doing a multiprocessing Pool set of tasks with a imap_unordered() call:

p = multiprocessing.Pool()
rs = p.imap_unordered(do_work, xrange(num_tasks))
p.close() # No more work
p.join() # Wait for completion

However, my num_tasks is around 250,000, and so the join() locks the main thread for 10 seconds or so, and I'd like to be able to echo out to the command line incrementally to show the main process isn't locked. Something like:

p = multiprocessing.Pool()
rs = p.imap_unordered(do_work, xrange(num_tasks))
p.close() # No more work
while (True):
  remaining = rs.tasks_remaining() # How many of the map call haven't been done yet?
  if (remaining == 0): break # Jump out of while loop
  print "Waiting for", remaining, "tasks to complete..."
  time.sleep(2)

Is there a method for the result object or the pool itself that indicates the number of tasks remaining? I tried using a multiprocessing.Value object as a counter (do_work calls a counter.value += 1 action after doing its task), but the counter only gets to ~85% of the total value before stopping incrementing.

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2 Answers 2

There is no need to access private attributes of the result set:

from __future__ import division
import sys

for i, _ in enumerate(p.imap_unordered(do_work, xrange(num_tasks)), 1):
    sys.stderr.write('\rdone {0:%}'.format(i/num_tasks))
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up vote 9 down vote accepted

Found an answer myself with some more digging: Taking a look at the __dict__ of the imap_unordered result object, I found it has a _index attribute that increments with each task completion. So this works for logging, wrapped in the while loop:

completed = rs._index
if (completed == num_tasks): break
print "Waiting for", num_tasks-completed, "tasks to complete..."
time.sleep(2)

However, I did find that swapping the imap_unordered for a map_async resulted in much faster execution, though the result object is a bit different. Instead, the result object from map_async has a _number_left attribute, and a ready() method:

if (rs.ready()): break
remaining = rs._number_left
print "Waiting for", remaining, "tasks to complete..."
time.sleep(0.5)
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I tested this for Python 2.7.6 and rs._number_left appears to be the number of chunks remaining. So if rs._chunksize isn't 1 then rs._number_left won't be the number of list items remaining. –  Allen Aug 19 at 21:14

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