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I have a simple data structure, where a film table has a foreign key to country table.

In order to retrieve all the films that are from the same country, I have this property 'same_country_films', a self-referential relationship.

It almost does the job correctly, however, it also includes the film itself in the list. How can I exclude it and just have other films?

Many thanks!

from sqlalchemy import Table, Column, Integer, String, MetaData, ForeignKey 
from sqlalchemy.orm import mapper, relationship
metadata = MetaData()
country_table = Table('country', metadata,
    Column('id', String, primary_key=True),
    Column('name', String),
    )
film_table = Table('film', metadata,
    Column('id', Integer, primary_key=True),
    Column('title', String),
    Column('year', Integer),
    Column('country_id', Integer, ForeignKey('country.id'))
    )

class Country(object):
    pass

class Film(object):
    pass

mapper(Country, country_table)

mapper(Film, film_table, 
        properties={
            'country':relationship(
                    Country,
                    backref='films'),
            'same_country_films':relationship(
                    Film,
                    primaryjoin=film_table.c.country_id==\
                                film_table.c.country_id,
                    foreign_keys=[
                        film_table.c.country_id,
                        ]
                    )
             }
    )
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2 Answers 2

The simplest solution is to code this property yourself instead of relation:

class Film(object):
    @property
    def same_country_films(self):
        return [f for f in self.country.films if f!=self]

This solution won't do separate query for this property when both film.same_country_films and country.films are accessed during session life. The property can't be updated as you can usualy do with relation, but I doubt it's realy needed.

The bad thing is that it's evaluated for each access (not so much work). You can change property decorator to chaching one (like cached_property in werkzeug), but then the property won't reflect changes in country.films after first access to it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. It's a good solution to the problem presented. To be honest, my real purpose is to use this film country example to explore how relationship works. Is it possible to solve the problem using relationship at all? –  Xuan Apr 27 '11 at 23:17

This should do it I think, (though I haven't actually tested it):

primaryjoin=sqlalchemy.and_(
    film_table.c.country_id==film_table.c.country_id,
    film_table.c.id!=film_table.c.id)
share|improve this answer
    
Not quite. It does not substitute the film_table.c.id with ? in the sql generated. –  Xuan Apr 21 '11 at 12:21

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