Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Anyone can get the equation for this? I couldn't

class Calculator {
    public int count = 0;
public void calc(int n, int p) {
    count++;
        if (p>n) return;
        for (int i=0; i<n; i++) {
            calc(n, p+1);
        }
    }
}

// int n is input by keyboard
Calculator c = new Calculator();
c.calc(n, 0);
System.out.println(c.count);

Anybody with the equation or any information ... thanks

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Sean Patrick Floyd, Brian Roach, bmargulies, Brad Larson, John Saunders Apr 15 '11 at 20:27

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

6  
I don't understand your question. –  Etienne de Martel Apr 14 '11 at 16:57
3  
What "equation"? –  Joseph Weissman Apr 14 '11 at 16:58
1  
Sure looks like Homework. Hint: It is two different ways to do iterations. Work it out for some small numbers of n. Also, the equation is a very simple expression. –  Captain Giraffe Apr 14 '11 at 17:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The count is incremented once and then calc is called n times, this recurses 1 + n times due to the p > n test. BTW If it were p >= n it would recurse n times.

The equation is

1 + n * (1 + n * ... (1 + n))

where the expression 1 + n appears 1 + n times.

e.g. calc(3,0) = 121 =

1 + 3 * (1 + 3 * (1 + 3 * (1 + 3)))
share|improve this answer
    
this is correct, beat me to it –  Richard H Apr 14 '11 at 17:14
    
@Richard, by at least 2 seconds. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Apr 14 '11 at 17:15

I think this will call

calc(n, 1); // this tree will appear n times
  calc(n, 2); // this tree will appear n times
    calc(n, 3) // this tree will appear n times
      .
       .
      calc(n, n+1) // this call will appear n times

Each invocation of calc will increment count. Calclating the number of calls is equivalent to calculating the number of nodes of a complete n-ary tree of height n+2 (the root of this tree represents the call c.calc(n, 0)). So I think the solution is

count = n^0 + n^1 + n^2 + ... + n^n + n^(n+1)
share|improve this answer
    
The count for n = 3 is 121, n = 4 is 1365. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 14 '11 at 17:26
    
@Peter you are right, my formula for calculating the count of nodes was wrong :) Now it's correct. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 14 '11 at 17:38

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.