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Basically, I've an object:

function tomatoe(name, owner) {
    $('<div>').click(this.squish).appendTo(myElement).text('I\'m a happy tomatoe called ' + name);

    this.name = name;
    this.dead = false;
    this.owner = owner;
    this.squish = function() {
        console.log('Oh my Google, you killed ' + this.name + '!');
        this.dead = true;
        this.owner.sad = true;
    };
}

The functionality is pretty straightforward. When instantiated, create a div, attach a click handler to it, and staple it onto something. Upon instantiation, two parameters are passed: a name and an owner. The owner is a reference to another object.

There are two problems with this code:

  1. The this reference in the squish function is broken, since it now refers to the element clicked.
  2. Because of chaining, when actually attaching the event, "this" refers to either jQuery or the newly-created div element (not sure which yet), so this.squish is undefined and never called.

If it helps in any way, the owner object has a reference to all tomatoes.

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facepalm I'm such an idiot...creating another instance of yourself is in OO JavaScript 101 –  Zirak Apr 14 '11 at 17:09
    
All your answers are correct...gonna let a random number generator decide which one. –  Zirak Apr 14 '11 at 17:14
    
lol @Zirak usually its the 1st correct one that gets the cake :-p –  Neal Apr 14 '11 at 17:16
    
I think I took random number generation a bit too far: jsfiddle.net/RJEyu –  Zirak Apr 14 '11 at 17:28
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You want to reassigned this to another variable so that the naming doesn't collide. It is also a good idea to create the div after you instantiated all of the variables.

function tomatoe(name, owner) {
    var that = this;

    that.name = name;
    that.dead = false;
    that.owner = owner;
    that.squish = function() {
        console.log('Oh my Google, you killed ' + that.name + '!');
        that.dead = true;
        that.owner.sad = true;
    };

    $('<div>').click(that.squish).appendTo(myElement).text('I\'m a happy tomatoe called ' + name);

}
share|improve this answer
    
You win the random number generator extreme. Thanks and congrats –  Zirak Apr 14 '11 at 17:28
    
@Zirak, you realize that is not how you are really supposed to pick answers on stack –  Neal Apr 14 '11 at 17:32
    
@Neal When multiple answers appear within a short period of time (like a minute or so), all answers are considered genuine. The OP may choose any of those answers. It would be different if this answer was posted like 10 minutes after another equally valid answer, but that is not the case here. –  Šime Vidas Apr 14 '11 at 17:39
    
@Sime ok, i was looking it up on the meta, and it is vague over there –  Neal Apr 14 '11 at 17:40
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Well, the easiest way of doing what you want to do is to create a local variable to store a reference to the tomatoe object like so:

function tomatoe(name, owner) {
  var _this = this;
  $('<div>').click(this.squish).appendTo(myElement).text('I\'m a happy tomatoe called ' + name);

  this.name = name;
  this.dead = false;
  this.owner = owner;
  this.squish = function() {
    console.log('Oh my Google, you killed ' + _this.name + '!');
    _this.dead = true;
    _this.owner.sad = true;
  };
}
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try this:

function tomatoe(name, owner) {

    //make a reference to this with self
    var self = this;

    $('<div>').click(self.squish).appendTo(myElement).text('I\'m a happy tomatoe called ' + name);

    this.name = name;
    this.dead = false;
    this.owner = owner;
    this.squish = function() {
        console.log('Oh my Google, you killed ' + this.name + '!');
        this.dead = true;
        this.owner.sad = true;
    };
}

what i would do if you want chanability:

var tomato = {
     name: null,
     dead: null,
     owner: null,

     init: function(name, owner){
          var self = this;
          $('<div>').click(self.squish)
                .appendTo(myElement).text('I\'m a happy tomatoe called ' + name);
          this.name = name;
          this.dead = false;
          this.owner = owner;
          return this;
     },

     squish: function(){
          console.log('Oh my Google, you killed ' + this.name + '!');
          this.dead = true;
          this.owner.sad = true;
          return this;
     }

}

//to instantiate it:
tomato.init(name, owner);
share|improve this answer
    
@Neal You forgot to use self instead of this inside the nested function... –  Šime Vidas Apr 14 '11 at 17:12
    
Sime, i beleieve this still refers to the correct this in the nested fn, i could be wrong though –  Neal Apr 14 '11 at 17:15
    
@Neal Yes, you're right. However, the jQuery line has to appear below the this.squish assignment. You don't need to create the self variable at all - inside click() this still refers to the instance. –  Šime Vidas Apr 14 '11 at 17:19
    
@Sime, that is possible, but not the same in my json solution –  Neal Apr 14 '11 at 17:21
    
@Neal No wait, you're not right :). The function is used as a click handler. Therefore, this refers to the element that is clicked (the DIV), and not the instance object. –  Šime Vidas Apr 14 '11 at 17:22
show 3 more comments

You have to place the jQuery line after the this.squish assignment! It is obviously undefined, until you assign a value to it.

function tomatoe(name, owner) {  

    var that = this;

    this.name = name;
    this.dead = false;
    this.owner = owner;
    this.squish = function() {
        console.log('Oh my Google, you killed ' + that.name + '!');
        that.dead = true;
        that.owner.sad = true;
    };

    $('<div>').click(this.squish).appendTo(myElement)
              .text('I\'m a happy tomatoe called ' + name);

}
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