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The following code gets all the rows from my Activities table that have not already been posted on Twitter. It then loops through and posts Twitter updates for each of those row. In the process, I would like to update the database to indicate these rows have now been "twittered".

However, I'm getting an error (indicated below) when I try and update this value. I assume this is because I'm using an anonymous type. However, if I use the full type, that will require pulling a lot of unnecessary data from the database.

Is there a way to accomplish this efficiently? Or is this yet another case where EF forces me to make compromises in performance?

using (MyEntities context = new MyEntities())
{
    var activities = from act in context.Activities
                     where act.ActTwittered == false
                     select new { act.ActID, act.ActTitle, act.Category,
                     act.ActDateTime, act.Location, act.ActTwittered };

    foreach (var activity in activities)
    {
        twitter.PostUpdate("...");
        activity.ActTwittered = true; // <== Error: ActTwittered is read-only
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Of course you can't update the database via the anonymous type. The anonymous type has no idea about the database, it's just a collection of properties. How many columns has the Activities table? would that really be so much data? –  Botz3000 Apr 14 '11 at 17:27
    
It would be several times more data than the existing code returns. It may not be the end of the World but it does add up. I'm getting pretty fed up with the way EF requires me to write inefficient code (if you are saying that is necessary). –  Jonathan Wood Apr 14 '11 at 17:29
    
@Jonathan Wood - Didn't you know what you were getting into? We didn't persue EF because we felt there was still a lot of room for improvement. –  JonH Apr 14 '11 at 17:30
    
@JonH: Well, the way I had it figured, the only way to fully understand what I was getting into was to try it out, which I've been doing. EF is all the rage right now and there seems to be more consulting opportunities if I learn it. But so far I don't like what I'm seeing. Glad to hear I'm not the only one. –  Jonathan Wood Apr 14 '11 at 17:33
    
@Jonathan Wood - There is a lot of opportunties in SAP too. It's not because of how great a product it is. It's all due to the really bad architecture of the product, hence the "opportunities". –  JonH Apr 14 '11 at 17:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could try a "fake object approach" like this:

using (MyEntities context = new MyEntities())
{
    var activities = from act in context.Activities
                     where act.ActTwittered == false
                     select new { act.ActID, act.ActTitle, act.Category,
                     act.ActDateTime, act.Location, act.ActTwittered };

    foreach (var activity in activities)
    {
        twitter.PostUpdate("...");

        // Create fake object with necessary primary key
        var act = new Activity()
        {
            ActID = activity.ActID,
            ActTwittered = false
        };

        // Attach to context -> act is in state "Unchanged"
        // but change-tracked now
        context.Activities.Attach(act);

        // Change a property -> act is in state "Modified" now
        act.ActTwittered = true;
    }

    // all act are sent to server with sql-update statements
    // only for the ActTwittered column
    context.SaveChanges();
}

It's "theoretical" code, not sure if it would work.

Edit

Not "theoretical" anymore. I've tested this with DbContext of EF 4.1 and it works as described in the sample code above. (Because DbContext is only a wrapper API around ObjectContext it's almost safe to assume that it also will work in EF 4.0.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for suggesting a workaround. I don't understand EF very well but what happens to the other columns in the row that I didn't initialize. Wouldn't this overwrite the other columns with empty values? –  Jonathan Wood Apr 14 '11 at 17:58
    
No, the trick is that by attaching this fake object to the context EF assumes that it respresents the current state of the object in the database (which is wrong of course). If we change now a single property after attaching, the change tracking mechanism of EF stores this information that only this single property has changed internally to create the sql update command later when we issue SaveChanges. Thus the other columns in the DB are unaffected by the update. As said, I didn't test something like this. But I have a good feeling that this or some very similar approach should work. –  Slauma Apr 14 '11 at 18:10
    
@Slauma: I see. So you're thinking EF is smart enough to only update the columns marked as needing to be updated. I don't know that I'll use that but, if it works, I agree that addresses the question asked. Thanks. –  Jonathan Wood Apr 14 '11 at 18:12
    
@Jonathan Wood: One important question: Are you using EF4.0 with ObjectContext? If yes, are you using entities derived from EntityObject or are you using POCOs? Or are you using EF4.1 with DbContext? My code will probably only have a chance to work for entities derived from EntityObject. I will look what to do in the other cases. –  Slauma Apr 14 '11 at 18:19
    
@Slauma: I haven not installed EF4.1. As far as the first question, I think so. Isn't that apparent from my code? –  Jonathan Wood Apr 14 '11 at 18:21

If you simply select 'act', then it should work. Don't forget to submit after editing.

share|improve this answer
    
As pointed out, that makes my code pull in a lot more information from the database, which takes a bit more time. Is this yet another example where EF requires me to write less efficient code? –  Jonathan Wood Apr 14 '11 at 17:30
    
As Akash said, by creating the anonymous type, you lose your connection to the table; therefor, the row cannot be updated. You can only update objects if you pull out the full object, which is really the only reasonable situation you can expect. –  Nik Apr 14 '11 at 17:35
    
@Nik: This is probably not time well spent but I would take exception to that last part. One might reasonably expect EF to provide some mechanism to efficiently update a single column in select rows without having to download all data for those rows. I can (and will) do it quite easily without EF. I see nothing preventing EF from incorporating such techniques. But then again, I've been programming many years and am quite opinionated about such things. :-) –  Jonathan Wood Apr 14 '11 at 17:39
    
Provide a mechanism to update a single column, sure, I would love that and I think it should be there. When you look at the code you have though, what you'd be asking is for EF to know from what table every column came from and then on top of that what row, which may require it figuring out extra ID columns to collect. I think that overhead is likely greater than just getting the whole row. –  Nik Apr 14 '11 at 17:47
    
@Nik: Again, this is probably not time well spent but one of many ways to approach it is to provide a mechanism where I'm working with the full entity but have a way to specify that I only want to retrieve some columns. Indeed, EF may very well implement something like that at some point. Yes, apparently, it cannot do it with the code I have. But let's not suggest that it's something that could not be done. –  Jonathan Wood Apr 14 '11 at 17:54

Why are you calling select new instead of returning entire object. Entity framework will only be able to update property if it is correctly defined in schema resources which certainly is not case with anonymous type.

Entity framework will never be able to determine which table and which field the property is mapped to.

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1  
As I explained in my question, I'm not returning the entire object because I want to be efficient. Looks like being efficient is not compatible with EF? –  Jonathan Wood Apr 14 '11 at 17:31

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