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Most Rails tutorials show how to populate a model class via the params hash like so:

class UsersController < ApplicationController   
    def create
        @user = User.create(params[:user])

        # more logic for saving user / redirecting / etc.     
    end  
end

This works great if all the attributes in your model are supposed to be strings. However, what happens if some of the attributes are supposed to be ints or dates or some other type?

For instance, let's say the User class looks like this

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
    attr_accessible :email, :employment_start_date, :gross_monthly_income
end

The :email attribute should be a string, the :employment_start_date attribute should be a date, and the :gross_monthly_income should be a decimal. In order for these attributes to be of the correct type, do I need to change my controller action to look something like this instead?

class UsersController < ApplicationController  
    def create
        @user = User.new
        @user.email = params[:user][:email]
        @user.employment_start_date = params[:user][:employment_start_date].convert_to_date
        @user.gross_monthly_income = params[:user][:gross_monthly_income].convert_to_decimal

        # more logic for saving user / redirecting / etc.
    end
end
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Are you sure that params[:user] will have all strings? I think the params hash will be converted properly when you use it with AR. –  rmk Apr 14 '11 at 18:07
    
@rmk Yes, you're right. I added an answer below basically saying the same thing. I'd mark it as the accepted answer, but I have to wait 2 days before I can mark my own answer as the accepted answer. –  Kevin Pang Apr 14 '11 at 18:11
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

According to the ActiveRecord documentation, the attributes should automatically be typecasted based on the column types in the database.

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I would actually add a before_save callback in your users model to make sure that the values you want are in the correct format i.e.:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  before_save :convert_values

  #...

  def convert_values
    gross_monthly_income = convert_to_decimal(gross_monthly_income)
    #and more conversions
  end

end

So you can just call User.new(params[:user]) in your controller, which follows the motto "Keep your controllers skinny"

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That seems like it should work. Is this the "rails way" of doing this? It seems like a situation that would come up very often, but for the life of me I can't find any tutorials / guides showing this. –  Kevin Pang Apr 14 '11 at 17:33
    
Added a new version which I like more. –  Mike Lewis Apr 14 '11 at 17:37
    
I like the before_save version. Question though: according to this, Rails is smart enough to do the conversion for you when it executes something like @user = User.new(params[:user]). If that's the case, then I guess this isn't necessary? I'm not sure if that's true though. –  Kevin Pang Apr 14 '11 at 17:40
1  
Yes, in the general case, rails will typecast the value to what the type of column. However this is a good solution if you need more flexibility etc –  Mike Lewis Apr 14 '11 at 18:21
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