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I'm trying to build a generic solution to the problem of enums with EF 4.1. My solution is basically a generic version of How to fake enums in ef 4. The enum wrapper class works wonderfully in the rest of the code and allows code like:

EnumWrapper<Color> c = Color.Red;

Here's the enum wrapper class:

public class EnumWrapper<TEnum> where TEnum : struct, IConvertible
{
    public EnumWrapper()
    {
        if (!typeof(TEnum).IsEnum)
            throw new ArgumentException("Not an enum");
    }

    public TEnum Enum { get; set; }

    public int Value
    {
        get { return Convert.ToInt32(Enum); }
        set { Enum = (TEnum)(object)value; }
    }

    public static implicit operator TEnum(EnumWrapper<TEnum> w)
    {
        if (w == null) return default(TEnum);
        else return w.Enum;
    }

    public static implicit operator EnumWrapper<TEnum>(TEnum e)
    {
        return new EnumWrapper<TEnum>() { Enum = e };
    }

    public static implicit operator int(EnumWrapper<TEnum> w)
    {
        if (w == null)
            return Convert.ToInt32(default(TEnum));
        else
            return w.Value;
    }
}

enum:

public enum Color { red = 1, green = 2, blue = 3 }

POCO:

public class ChickenSandwich 
{
    public ChickenSandwich() {
        CheeseColor = new EnumWrapper<Color>();
    }

    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public EnumWrapper<Color> CheeseColor { get; set; }
}

Mapping:

public class ColorMapping : ComplexTypeConfiguration<EnumWrapper<Color>> 
{
    public ColorMapping() {
        Ignore(x => x.Enum);
        Property(x => x.Value);
    }
}

I've also tried mapping it on the ChickenSandwich's EntityTypeConfiguration like this:

Property(x => x.CheeseColor.Value).HasColumnName("CheeseColor");

If I leave it up to the ColorMapping and do no explicit mapping on the ChickenSandwichMapping, it just doesn't put it in the database. If I map it the x.CheeseColor.Value way, I get the dreaded:

System.InvalidOperationException: The configured property 'CheeseColor' is not a declared property on the entity 'ChickenSandwich'. Verify that it has not been explicitly excluded from the model and that it is a valid primitive property..


Edit

I wasn't able to get the generic version of the enum wrapper working, so I've gone with writing individual wrappers. It's not exactly what I wanted because it violates the DRY principle, but it does allow me to query the column as an enum.

[ComplexType]
public class ColorWrapper
{
    [NotMapped]
    public Color Enum { get; set; }

    public int Value
    {
        get { return (int)Enum; }
        set { Enum = (Color)value; }
    }

    public static implicit operator Color(ColorWrapper w)
    {
        if (w == null) return default(Color);

        return w.Enum;
    }

    public static implicit operator ColorWrapper(Color c)
    {
        return new ColorWrapper { Enum = c };
    }
}

I had to use the ColorWrapper on the ChickenSandwich class. It works more or less transparently. Then had to add this to my mapping class constructor to get the column name I wanted:

Property(x => x.CheeseColor.Value).HasColumnName("CheeseColorId");
share|improve this question
up vote 30 down vote accepted

There's a much simpler way to map enums in EF 4: just create an int property on your ChickenSandwich class to represent the int value of the enum. That's the property that EF should map, then have a "mini wrapper" property to allow you to use the enum

public class ChickenSandwich 
{   
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    // This property will be mapped
    public int CheeseColorValue { get; set; }

    public Color CheseColor
    {
        get { return (Color) CheeseColorValue; }
        set { CheeseColorValue = (int) value; }
    }
}

I actually don't have to use the Fluent API or any kind of attribute decoration for this to work. On generating the database, EF will happily ignore any type it doesn't know how to map, but the int property will be mapped.

I have tried mapping enums based on that article too, but it caused me no end of headaches. This method works well, and you could adapt your solution to use your wrapper as the "mapping" property, i.e. CheeseColor in this case.

share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't we have to do linq queries against the int value in order for it to query the underlying database, though? I.e. wouldn't we have to do "from cs in ChickenSandwiches where CheeseColorValue = (int)CheeseColor.Red" – Nathan Craddock Apr 15 '11 at 13:44
3  
@Nathan - That is correct I'm afraid. I saw it as a small price to pay after all the trouble the other method gave me. I must say in my case the int/enum properties haven't been much the focus of my where clauses. – Sergi Papaseit Apr 15 '11 at 14:09
    
I wound up going with individual wrappers for each enum. It's repetitious, but it does let me query with enums, which we do quite a bit actually. The real application isn't actually about chicken sandwiches. It's more like querying a list of customers based on whether they're companies, individuals, etc. – Nathan Craddock Apr 15 '11 at 14:49

That might be the best option for enums, but another idea would be to just use constants instead of enums:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Console.WriteLine("There are {0} red chicken sandwiches.", 
        sandwiches.ChickenSandwiches
                  .Where(s => s.Color == Color.red)
                  .ToArray().Length);
}

public struct Color
{
    public const int red = 1;
    public const int green = 2;
}

public class ChickenSandwich
{
    public ChickenSandwich()
    {
    }

    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Color { get; set; }
}

public class Sandwiches : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<ChickenSandwich> ChickenSandwiches { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
That is one way to solve it, but it destroys the type safety of the enum. Any functions we had where you passed in a Color, would now pass in an int. – Nathan Craddock Apr 14 '11 at 19:35

I got Nathan generic enum wrapper class to work by simply making it abstract and move:

public static implicit operator EnumWrapper <TEnum> (TEnum e)

to the derived classes like this:

public class CategorySortWrapper : EnumWrapper<CategorySort>
{
    public static implicit operator CategorySortWrapper(CategorySort e)
    {
        return new CategorySortWrapper() { Enum = e };
    }
}

public abstract class EnumWrapper<TEnum> where TEnum : struct, IConvertible
{
    public EnumWrapper()
    {
        if (!typeof(TEnum).IsEnum)
            throw new ArgumentException("Not an enum");
    }

    public TEnum Enum { get; set; }

    public int Value
    {
        get { return Convert.ToInt32(Enum); }
        set { Enum = (TEnum)(object)value; }
    }

    public static implicit operator int(EnumWrapper<TEnum> w)
    {
        if (w == null)
            return Convert.ToInt32(default(TEnum));
        else
            return w.Value;
    }
}

in my code I just using the it like this

public CategorySortWrapper ChildSortType { get; set; }

category.ChildSortType = CategorySort.AlphabeticOrder;

I didn't do anything else and EF 4.1 created a "ComplexType like field" in the database named ChildSortType_Value

share|improve this answer
    
Really liked this solution, hopefully OP (OA? OQ?) comes back to it to add some DRYness. – Marc L. Oct 13 '11 at 16:08
    
This answer was the solution for me as well. More elegant than the accepted answer. – OSH Feb 27 '12 at 17:38

based on Henrik Stenbæk answer. assigning is working fine

category.ChildSortType = CategorySort.AlphabeticOrder

but comparing the wrapper to its enum doesn't work.

if(category.ChildSortType == CategorySort.AlphabeticOrder)
{

}

the following operator should be added to the abstract class

public static implicit operator TEnum(EnumWrapper<TEnum> w)
        {
            if (w == null)
                return default(TEnum);
            else
                return w.EnumVal;
        }
share|improve this answer

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