Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have half a dozen classes which all extend the same abstract class. The abstract class has a static variable pointing to some JNI code that I only want to load once per instantiation of the classes.

From what I understand this results in exactly one instance of this static variable being instantiated, but what I want is for each of the extending classes to have their own static instance of the variable that is unique for the given child class. I want to write some code in my abstract class that modifies and/or releases the abstract class. Is it possible to do both of these things at once?

So as an example can I write an abstract class bar with an variable foo and a printFoo method which prints the content of foo. Then I instantiate in order fooBar1, fooBar2, and fooBar3 which each extend the bar class and initialize foo to different values in static blocks. If I call foobar1.printFoo I want to print the static value of foo initialized by fooBar1 constructor.

Can this be done in java?

share|improve this question
    
Please close the bracket in your first paragraph, that drives me crazy! –  HXCaine Apr 14 '11 at 18:34
    
a static variable pointing to some code. Can you explain that a bit more? How do you point to code in java? –  mdma Apr 14 '11 at 18:57
    
I'm using jocl which is a JNI wrapper around OpenCL GPU code. To tell the GPU what to do one has to create a CL_program which points to the code to be run and from that generate a cl_kernel representing the compiled kernel that the GPU will use. The program and kernel variables are the ones I have as static because it takes too long to do just-in-time compilation of the GPU code. But I want, amongst other things, a release method the abstract class which can be used to release the code. –  drew Apr 14 '11 at 19:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can approximate it, but you will need separate static variables for each subclass, to stop subclasses overwriting each others values. It's easiest to abstract this via a getter getFoo so that each subclass fetches the foo from the right place.

Something like this

abstract class Bar
{
   // you don't have to have this in the base class 
   // - you could leave out the variable and make
   // getFoo() abstract.
   static private String foo;

   String getFoo() {
     return foo;
   }

   public void printFoo() {
      System.out.print(getFoo());
   }
}

class Foo1 extends Bar
{
   static final String foo1;

   public String getFoo() {
      return foo1;  // return our foo1 value
   }

   public Foo1() {
      foo1 = "myfoo1";
   }
}


class Foo2 extends Foo1
{
   static final String foo2;

   public String getFoo() {
      return foo2;  // return our foo2 value
   }

   public Foo2() {
      foo2 = "myfoo2";
   }
}
share|improve this answer

I have a similar problem. Looks like Java can't isolate static members (attributes). I ended up adding an abstract method instead of the attribute:

public abstract class Abs {
    public void printX() {
        System.out.println("For " + this.getClass() + " x=" + getX());
    }

    protected abstract Integer getX();

}

public class A extends Abs {
    protected static Integer x = 1;

    @Override
    protected Integer getX() {
        return x;
    }

}

public class B extends Abs {
    protected static Integer x = 2;

    @Override
    protected Integer getX() {
        return x;
    }

}

public class test {

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        Abs a = new A();
        a.printX();
        Abs b = new B();
        b.printX();
        Abs c = new A();
        a.printX();
        b.printX();
        c.printX();

    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.