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In Javascript, I'm trying to take an initial array of number values and count the elements inside it. Ideally, the result would be two new arrays, the first specifying each unique element, and the second containing the number of times each element occurs. However, I'm open to suggestions on the format of the output.

For example, if the initial array was:

5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4

Then two new arrays would be created. The first would contain the name of each unique element:

5, 2, 9, 4

The second would contain the number of times that element occurred in the initial array:

3, 5, 1, 1

Because the number 5 occurs three times in the initial array, the number 2 occurs five times and 9 and 4 both appear once.

I've searched a lot for a solution, but nothing seems to work, and everything I've tried myself has wound up being ridiculously complex. Any help would be appreciated!

Thanks :)

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10 Answers 10

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here you go:

function foo(arr) {
    var a = [], b = [], prev;

    arr.sort();
    for ( var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++ ) {
        if ( arr[i] !== prev ) {
            a.push(arr[i]);
            b.push(1);
        } else {
            b[b.length-1]++;
        }
        prev = arr[i];
    }

    return [a, b];
}

Live demo: http://jsfiddle.net/simevidas/bnACW/

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Works great :) Thanks a lot! –  Jack W Apr 14 '11 at 21:14
3  
has side-effect of sorting the array (side effects are bad), also sorting is O(N log(N)) and the elegance gain isn't worth it –  ninjagecko May 25 '11 at 17:05
    
@ninja Which other answer do you prefer? –  Šime Vidas May 25 '11 at 18:40
    
In absence of a nice high-level primitive from a third-party library, I would normally implement this like the reduce answer. I was about to submit such an answer before I saw it already existed. Nevertheless the counts[num] = counts[num] ? counts[num]+1 : 1 answer also works (equivalent to the if(!result[a[i]])result[a[i]]=0 answer, which is more elegant but less easy to read); this answers can be modified to use a "nicer" version of the for loop, perhaps a third-party for-loop, but I sort of ignored that since the standard index-based for-loops are sadly the default. –  ninjagecko May 25 '11 at 18:51
1  
@ninja I agree. Those answers are better. Unfortunately I cannot un-accept my own answer. –  Šime Vidas May 25 '11 at 20:59
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You can use an object to hold the results:

var arr = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4];
var counts = {};

for(var i = 0; i< arr.length; i++) {
    var num = arr[i];
    counts[num] = counts[num] ? counts[num]+1 : 1;
}

So, now your counts object can tell you what the count is for a particular number:

console.log(counts[5]); // logs '3'

If you want to get an array of members, just use the keys() functions

keys(counts); // returns ["5", "2", "9", "4"]
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1  
It should be pointed out, that Object.keys() function is only supported in IE9+, FF4+, SF5+, CH6+ but Opera doesn't support it. I think the biggest show stopper here is IE9+. –  Robert Koritnik Jul 28 '11 at 14:45
    
and Object.keys() not working in the current chrome –  Michael Jul 27 '13 at 22:09
    
Similarly, I also like counts[num] = (counts[num] || 0) + 1. That way you only have to write counts[num] twice instead of three times on that one line there. –  Robru 2 days ago
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var a = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4].reduce(function (acc, curr) {
  if (typeof acc[curr] == 'undefined') {
    acc[curr] = 1;
  } else {
    acc[curr] += 1;
  }

  return acc;
}, {});

// a == {2: 5, 4: 1, 5: 3, 9: 1}
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Don't use two arrays for the result, use an object:

a      = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4];
result = { };
for(i = 0; i < a.length; ++i) {
    if(!result[a[i]])
        result[a[i]] = 0;
    ++result[a[i]];
}

Then result will look like:

{
    2: 5,
    4: 1,
    5: 3,
    9: 1
}
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If you are using underscore you can go the functional route

a = ['foo', 'foo', 'bar'];

var results = _.reduce(a,function(counts,key){ counts[key]++; return counts },
                  _.object( _.map( _.uniq(a), function(key) { return [key, 0] })))

so your first array is

_.keys(results)

and the second array is

_.values(results)

most of this will default to native javascript functions if they are available

demo : http://jsfiddle.net/dAaUU/

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Here's just something light and easy for the eyes...

function count(a,i){
 var result = 0;
 for(var o in a)
  if(a[o] == i)
   result++;
 return result;
}
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You could extend the Array prototype, like this:

Array.prototype.frequencies = function() {
    var l = this.length, result = {all:[]};
    while (l--){
       result[this[l]] = result[this[l]] ? ++result[this[l]] : 1;
    }
    // all pairs (label, frequencies) to an array of arrays(2)
    for (var l in result){
       if (result.hasOwnProperty(l) && l !== 'all'){
          result.all.push([ l,result[l] ]);
       }
    }
    return result;
};

var freqs = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4].frequencies();
alert(freqs[2]); //=> 5
// or
var freqs = '1,1,2,one,one,2,2,22,three,four,five,three,three,five'
             .split(',')
             .frequencies();
alert(freqs.three); //=> 3

Alternatively you can utilize Array.map:

  Array.prototype.frequencies  = function () {
    var freqs = {sum: 0}; 
    this.map( function (a){ 
        if (!(a in this)) { this[a] = 1; } 
        else { this[a] += 1; }
        this.sum += 1;
        return a; }, freqs
    );
    return freqs;
  }
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Try this:

Array.prototype.getItemCount = function(item) {
    var counts = {};
    for(var i = 0; i< this.length; i++) {
        var num = this[i];
        counts[num] = counts[num] ? counts[num]+1 : 1;
    }
    return counts[item] || 0;
}
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Check out the code below.

<html>
<head>
<script>
// array with values
var ar = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4];

var Unique = []; // we'll store a list of unique values in here
var Counts = []; // we'll store the number of occurances in here

for(var i in ar)
{
    var Index = ar[i];
    Unique[Index] = ar[i];
    if(typeof(Counts[Index])=='undefined')  
        Counts[Index]=1;
    else
        Counts[Index]++;
}

// remove empty items
Unique = Unique.filter(function(){ return true});
Counts = Counts.filter(function(){ return true});

alert(ar.join(','));
alert(Unique.join(','));
alert(Counts.join(','));

var a=[];

for(var i=0; i<Unique.length; i++)
{
    a.push(Unique[i] + ':' + Counts[i] + 'x');
}
alert(a.join(', '));

</script>
</head>
<body>

</body>
</html>
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You can make this a lot easier by extending your arrays with a count function. It works kind of like Rails’ Array#count, if you’re familiar with it.

Array.prototype.count = function(obj){
    var count = this.length;
    if(typeof(obj) !== "undefined"){
        var array = this.slice(0), count = 0; // clone array and reset count
        for(i = 0; i < array.length; i++){
            if(array[i] == obj){
                count++;
            }
        }
    }
    return count;
}

Usage:

var array = ['a', 'a', 'b', 'c'];
array.count('a'); // => 2
array.count('b'); // => 1
array.count('d'); // => 0
array.count(); // => 4

Source (gist)

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