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In Javascript, I'm trying to take an initial array of number values and count the elements inside it. Ideally, the result would be two new arrays, the first specifying each unique element, and the second containing the number of times each element occurs. However, I'm open to suggestions on the format of the output.

For example, if the initial array was:

5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4

Then two new arrays would be created. The first would contain the name of each unique element:

5, 2, 9, 4

The second would contain the number of times that element occurred in the initial array:

3, 5, 1, 1

Because the number 5 occurs three times in the initial array, the number 2 occurs five times and 9 and 4 both appear once.

I've searched a lot for a solution, but nothing seems to work, and everything I've tried myself has wound up being ridiculously complex. Any help would be appreciated!

Thanks :)

share|improve this question
    
If all you needed was to see if a value appears only once (instead of two or more times), you could use if (arr.indexOf(value) == arr.lastIndexOf(value)) – Rodrigo Mar 6 at 12:58

17 Answers 17

up vote 38 down vote accepted

Here you go:

function foo(arr) {
    var a = [], b = [], prev;

    arr.sort();
    for ( var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++ ) {
        if ( arr[i] !== prev ) {
            a.push(arr[i]);
            b.push(1);
        } else {
            b[b.length-1]++;
        }
        prev = arr[i];
    }

    return [a, b];
}

Live demo: http://jsfiddle.net/simevidas/bnACW/

share|improve this answer
7  
has side-effect of sorting the array (side effects are bad), also sorting is O(N log(N)) and the elegance gain isn't worth it – ninjagecko May 25 '11 at 17:05
1  
@ninja Which other answer do you prefer? – Šime Vidas May 25 '11 at 18:40
    
In absence of a nice high-level primitive from a third-party library, I would normally implement this like the reduce answer. I was about to submit such an answer before I saw it already existed. Nevertheless the counts[num] = counts[num] ? counts[num]+1 : 1 answer also works (equivalent to the if(!result[a[i]])result[a[i]]=0 answer, which is more elegant but less easy to read); this answers can be modified to use a "nicer" version of the for loop, perhaps a third-party for-loop, but I sort of ignored that since the standard index-based for-loops are sadly the default. – ninjagecko May 25 '11 at 18:51
1  
@ninja I agree. Those answers are better. Unfortunately I cannot un-accept my own answer. – Šime Vidas May 25 '11 at 20:59

You can use an object to hold the results:

var arr = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4];
var counts = {};

for(var i = 0; i< arr.length; i++) {
    var num = arr[i];
    counts[num] = counts[num] ? counts[num]+1 : 1;
}

So, now your counts object can tell you what the count is for a particular number:

console.log(counts[5]); // logs '3'

If you want to get an array of members, just use the keys() functions

keys(counts); // returns ["5", "2", "9", "4"]
share|improve this answer
1  
It should be pointed out, that Object.keys() function is only supported in IE9+, FF4+, SF5+, CH6+ but Opera doesn't support it. I think the biggest show stopper here is IE9+. – Robert Koritnik Jul 28 '11 at 14:45
    
and Object.keys() not working in the current chrome – Michael Jul 27 '13 at 22:09
5  
Similarly, I also like counts[num] = (counts[num] || 0) + 1. That way you only have to write counts[num] twice instead of three times on that one line there. – Robru Jul 21 '14 at 1:18
var a = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4].reduce(function (acc, curr) {
  if (typeof acc[curr] == 'undefined') {
    acc[curr] = 1;
  } else {
    acc[curr] += 1;
  }

  return acc;
}, {});

// a == {2: 5, 4: 1, 5: 3, 9: 1}
share|improve this answer
4  
acc[curr] ? acc[curr]++ : acc[curr] = 1; – pmandell Nov 9 '15 at 19:48

Don't use two arrays for the result, use an object:

a      = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4];
result = { };
for(var i = 0; i < a.length; ++i) {
    if(!result[a[i]])
        result[a[i]] = 0;
    ++result[a[i]];
}

Then result will look like:

{
    2: 5,
    4: 1,
    5: 3,
    9: 1
}
share|improve this answer

If using underscore or lodash, this is the simplest thing to do:

_.countBy(array, _.identity);

Such that:

_.countBy([5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4], _.identity)
=> Object {2: 5, 4: 1, 5: 3, 9: 1}

As pointed out by others, you can then execute the _.keys() and _.values() functions on the result to get just the unique numbers, and their occurrences, respectively. But in my experience, the original object is much easier to deal with.

share|improve this answer
    
, _.identity is optional. You can just write _.countBy(array) – Elmo Jul 13 at 18:52

I think this is the simplest way how to count occurrences with same value in array.

var a = [true, false, false, false];
a.filter(function(value){
    return value === false;
}).length
share|improve this answer

If you favour a single liner.

arr.reduce(function(countMap, word) {countMap[word] = ++countMap[word] || 1;return countMap}, {});

Edit (6/12/2015): The Explanation from the inside out. countMap is a map that maps a word with its frequency, which we can see the anonymous function. What reduce does is apply the function with arguments as all the array elements and countMap being passed as the return value of the last function call. The last parameter ({}) is the default value of countMap for the first function call.

share|improve this answer
    
You should explain this. that would make it a much better answer so people can learn how to use it in other use cases. – agrothe Apr 25 '15 at 23:38
    
Added, Thanks for suggesting @agrothe – Rounaq_intel Jun 12 '15 at 15:22

If you are using underscore you can go the functional route

a = ['foo', 'foo', 'bar'];

var results = _.reduce(a,function(counts,key){ counts[key]++; return counts },
                  _.object( _.map( _.uniq(a), function(key) { return [key, 0] })))

so your first array is

_.keys(results)

and the second array is

_.values(results)

most of this will default to native javascript functions if they are available

demo : http://jsfiddle.net/dAaUU/

share|improve this answer

As it's 2016, how about an ES6 option.

var a = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4];

var aCount = new Map([...new Set(a)].map(
    x => [x, a.filter(y => y === x).length]
));
aCount.get(5)  // 3
aCount.get(2)  // 5
aCount.get(9)  // 1
aCount.get(4)  // 1

This example passes the input array to the Set constructor creating a collection of unique values. The spread operator then expands these values into a new array so we can call map and translate this into a two-dimensional array of [value, count] pairs - i.e. the following structure:

Array [
   [5, 3],
   [2, 5],
   [9, 1],
   [4, 1]
]

The new array is then passed to the Map constructor resulting in an iterable object:

Map {
    5 => 3,
    2 => 5,
    9 => 1,
    4 => 1
}

The great thing about a Map object is that it preserves data-types - that is to say aCount.get(5) will return 3 but aCount.get("5") will return undefined. It also allows for any value / type to act as a key meaning this solution will also work with an array of objects.

function frequencies(/* {Array} */ a){
    return new Map([...new Set(a)].map(
        x => [x, a.filter(y => y === x).length]
    ));
}

var foo = { value: 'foo' },
    bar = { value: 'bar' },
    baz = { value: 'baz' };

var aNumbers = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4],
    aObjects = [foo, bar, foo, foo, baz, bar];

frequencies(aNumbers).forEach((val, key) => console.log(key + ': ' + val));
frequencies(aObjects).forEach((val, key) => console.log(key.value + ': ' + val));

» Fiddle: CodePen

share|improve this answer

You could extend the Array prototype, like this:

Array.prototype.frequencies = function() {
    var l = this.length, result = {all:[]};
    while (l--){
       result[this[l]] = result[this[l]] ? ++result[this[l]] : 1;
    }
    // all pairs (label, frequencies) to an array of arrays(2)
    for (var l in result){
       if (result.hasOwnProperty(l) && l !== 'all'){
          result.all.push([ l,result[l] ]);
       }
    }
    return result;
};

var freqs = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4].frequencies();
alert(freqs[2]); //=> 5
// or
var freqs = '1,1,2,one,one,2,2,22,three,four,five,three,three,five'
             .split(',')
             .frequencies();
alert(freqs.three); //=> 3

Alternatively you can utilize Array.map:

  Array.prototype.frequencies  = function () {
    var freqs = {sum: 0}; 
    this.map( function (a){ 
        if (!(a in this)) { this[a] = 1; } 
        else { this[a] += 1; }
        this.sum += 1;
        return a; }, freqs
    );
    return freqs;
  }
share|improve this answer

Here's just something light and easy for the eyes...

function count(a,i){
 var result = 0;
 for(var o in a)
  if(a[o] == i)
   result++;
 return result;
}
share|improve this answer

Try this:

Array.prototype.getItemCount = function(item) {
    var counts = {};
    for(var i = 0; i< this.length; i++) {
        var num = this[i];
        counts[num] = counts[num] ? counts[num]+1 : 1;
    }
    return counts[item] || 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Check out the code below.

<html>
<head>
<script>
// array with values
var ar = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4];

var Unique = []; // we'll store a list of unique values in here
var Counts = []; // we'll store the number of occurances in here

for(var i in ar)
{
    var Index = ar[i];
    Unique[Index] = ar[i];
    if(typeof(Counts[Index])=='undefined')  
        Counts[Index]=1;
    else
        Counts[Index]++;
}

// remove empty items
Unique = Unique.filter(function(){ return true});
Counts = Counts.filter(function(){ return true});

alert(ar.join(','));
alert(Unique.join(','));
alert(Counts.join(','));

var a=[];

for(var i=0; i<Unique.length; i++)
{
    a.push(Unique[i] + ':' + Counts[i] + 'x');
}
alert(a.join(', '));

</script>
</head>
<body>

</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer

You can make this a lot easier by extending your arrays with a count function. It works kind of like Rails’ Array#count, if you’re familiar with it.

Array.prototype.count = function(obj){
    var count = this.length;
    if(typeof(obj) !== "undefined"){
        var array = this.slice(0), count = 0; // clone array and reset count
        for(i = 0; i < array.length; i++){
            if(array[i] == obj){
                count++;
            }
        }
    }
    return count;
}

Usage:

var array = ['a', 'a', 'b', 'c'];
array.count('a'); // => 2
array.count('b'); // => 1
array.count('d'); // => 0
array.count(); // => 4

Source (gist)

share|improve this answer

Given array x i.e x = ['boy','man','oldman','scout','pilot']; number of occurrences of an element 'man' is

x.length - x.toString().split(',man,').toString().split(',').length ;
share|improve this answer
    
Nice one-liner. Error-prone though. In your example, the answer would be 2, not 1, because man is a substring of oldman. – Mogsdad Nov 6 '15 at 18:36
    
@Mogsdad : thanks for pointing it out, check now. I've rectified it. – Shashank A Jan 11 at 5:27
    
Will now not count man at the beginning or the end of the array. – Steffen Roßkamp Feb 25 at 15:29
    
That will need additional check and addition to the obtained count, that's what I can think right now ! – Shashank A Feb 26 at 6:31

I was solving a similar problem on codewars and devised the following solution which worked for me.

This gives the highest count of an integer in an array and also the integer itself. I think it can be applied to string array as well.

To properly sort Strings, remove the function(a, b){return a-b} from inside the sort() portion

function mostFrequentItemCount(collection) {
    collection.sort(function(a, b){return a-b});
    var i=0;
    var ans=[];
    var int_ans=[];
    while(i<collection.length)
    {
        if(collection[i]===collection[i+1])
        {
            int_ans.push(collection[i]);
        }
        else
        {
            int_ans.push(collection[i]);
            ans.push(int_ans);
            int_ans=[];
        }
        i++;
    }

    var high_count=0;
    var high_ans;

    i=0;
    while(i<ans.length)
    {
        if(ans[i].length>high_count)
        {
            high_count=ans[i].length;
            high_ans=ans[i][0];
        }
        i++;
    }
    return high_ans;
}
share|improve this answer

Here's a classic old school method for counting arrays.

var arr = [5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 9, 4];
var counted = [], count = [];
var i = 0, j = 0, k = 0;
while (k < arr.length) {
    if (counted.indexOf(arr[k]) < 0) {
        counted[i] = arr[k];
        count[i] = 0;
        for (j = 0; j < arr.length; j++) {
            if (counted[i] == arr[j]) {
                count[i]++;
            }
        }
        i++;
    } else {
        k++;
    }
}

You can sort it first if you want an alphabetical result, but if you want to preserve the order in which the data was entered then give this a try. Nested loops may be a bit slower than some of the other methods on this page.

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