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Package:

Data:

  • A rasterStack with 10 bands.
  • Each of the bands contains an image area surrounded by NAs
  • Bands are logical, i.e. "1" for image data and "0"/NA for surrounding area
  • The "image areas" of each band do not align completely with each other, though most have partial overlaps

Objective:

  • Write a fast function that can return either a rasterLayer or cell numbers for each "zone", for instance a pixel containing data only from bands 1 and 2 falls in zone 1, a pixel containing data only from bands 3 and 4 falls in zone 2, etc. If a rasterLayer is returned, I need to be able to match the zone value with band numbers later.

First attempt:

# Possible band combinations
values = integer(0)
for(i in 1:nlayers(myraster)){
 combs = combn(1:nlayers(myraster), i)
 for(j in 1:ncol(combs)){
  values = c(values, list(combs[,j]))
 }
}

# Define the zone finding function
find_zones = function(bands){

 # The intersection of the bands of interest
 a = subset(myraster, 1)
 values(a) = TRUE
 for(i in bands){
  a = a & myraster[[i]]
 }

 # Union of the remaining bands
 b = subset(myraster, 1)
 values(b) = FALSE
 for(i in seq(1:nlayers(myraster))[-bands]){
  b = b | myraster[[i]]
 }

 #plot(a & !b)
 cells = Which(a & !b, cells=TRUE)
 return(cells)
}

# Applying the function
results = lapply(values, find_zones)

My current function takes a very long time to execute. Can you think of a better way? Note that I don't simply want to know how many bands have data at each pixel, I also need to know which bands. The purpose of this is to process different the areas differently afterwards.

Note also that the real-life scenario is a 3000 x 3000 or more raster with potentially more than 10 bands.


EDIT

Some sample data consisting of 10 offset image areas:

# Sample data
library(raster)    
for(i in 1:10) {
  start_line = i*10*1000
  end_line = 1000000 - 800*1000 - start_line
  offset = i * 10
  data = c(rep(0,start_line), rep(c(rep(0,offset), rep(1,800), rep(0,200-offset)), 800), rep(0, end_line))
  current_layer = raster(nrows=1000, ncols=1000)
  values(current_layer) = data
  if(i == 1) {
    myraster = stack(current_layer)
  } else {
    myraster = addLayer(myraster, current_layer)
  }
}
NAvalue(myraster) = 0  # You may not want to do this depending on your solution...

Showing what the sample data looks like

share|improve this question
    
Can you elaborate on what a "zone" is? –  Roman Luštrik Apr 14 '11 at 20:54
    
I would define a "zone" a group of cells which have data in the same bands (and only those bands in common). For example if you had two layers with each a square but one offset by 100 pixels, you would have 3 zones, one with only band 1, one with only band 2 and one with both. I would need either for those to be numbered in a rasterLayer, with a data frame to link band numbers and zone numbers, or a function that can return which cell numbers belong to each zone. In the end, each pixel where the is data in at least 1 band needs to be assigned to such a "zone". –  Benjamin Apr 15 '11 at 3:24
    
Kind of like if you did a union on polygon features, but with the added requirement of knowing which original polygon the sub-areas had in common. –  Benjamin Apr 15 '11 at 3:32
1  
@Benjamin : care to add some sample data as a test case? –  Joris Meys Apr 15 '11 at 10:11
    
@Joris Meys: Done. Good idea. –  Benjamin Apr 15 '11 at 15:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+250

EDIT : Answer updated using Nick's trick and matrix multiplication.


You could try the following function, optimized by using Nick's trick and matrix multiplication. The bottleneck now is filling up stack with the seperate layers, but I guess the timings are quite OK now. Memory usage is a bit less, but given your data and the nature of R, I don't know if you can nibble of a bit without hampering the performance big time.

> system.time(T1 <- FindBands(myraster,return.stack=T))
   user  system elapsed 
   6.32    2.17    8.48 
> system.time(T2 <- FindBands(myraster,return.stack=F))
   user  system elapsed 
   1.58    0.02    1.59 
> system.time(results <- lapply(values, find_zones))
  Timing stopped at: 182.27 35.13 217.71

The function returns either a rasterStack with the different level combinations present in the plot (that's not all possible level combinations, so you have some gain there already), or a matrix with the level number and level names. This allows you to do something like :

levelnames <- attr(T2,"levels")[T2]

to get the level names for each cell point. As shown below, you can easily put that matrix inside a rasterLayer object.

The function :

 FindBands <- function(x,return.stack=F){
    dims <- dim(x)
    Values <- getValues(x)
    nn <- colnames(Values)

    vec <- 2^((1:dims[3])-1)
    #Get all combinations and the names
    id <- unlist(
                lapply(1:10,function(x) combn(1:10,x,simplify=F))
              ,recursive=F)

    nameid <- sapply(id,function(i){
      x <- sum(vec[i])
      names(x) <- paste(i,collapse="-")
      x
    })
    # Nicks approach
    layers <- Values %*% vec
    # Find out which levels we need
    LayerLevels <- unique(sort(layers))
    LayerNames <- c("No Layer",names(nameid[nameid %in% LayerLevels]))

    if(return.stack){
        myStack <- lapply(LayerLevels,function(i){
          r <- raster(nr=dims[1],nc=dims[2])
          r[] <- as.numeric(layers == i)
          r
          } )
        myStack <- stack(myStack)
        layerNames(myStack) <- LayerNames
        return(myStack)

    } else {

      LayerNumber <- match(layers,LayerLevels)
      LayerNumber <- matrix(LayerNumber,ncol=dims[2],byrow=T)
      attr(LayerNumber,"levels") <- LayerNames
      return(LayerNumber)
    }    
}

Proof of concept, using the data of RobertH :

r <- raster(nr=10, nc=10)
r[]=0
r[c(20:60,90:93)] <- 1
s <- list(r)
r[]=0
r[c(40:70,93:98)] <- 1
s <- c(s, r)
r[]=0
r[50:95] <- 1
s <- (c(s, r))
aRaster <- stack(s)


> X <- FindBands(aRaster,return.stack=T)
> plot(X)

enter image description here

> X <- FindBands(aRaster,return.stack=F)
> X
      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9] [,10]
 [1,]    1    1    1    1    1    1    1    1    1     1
 [2,]    1    1    1    1    1    1    1    1    1     2
 [3,]    2    2    2    2    2    2    2    2    2     2
 [4,]    2    2    2    2    2    2    2    2    2     4
 [5,]    4    4    4    4    4    4    4    4    4     8
 [6,]    8    8    8    8    8    8    8    8    8     8
 [7,]    7    7    7    7    7    7    7    7    7     7
 [8,]    5    5    5    5    5    5    5    5    5     5
 [9,]    5    5    5    5    5    5    5    5    5     6
[10,]    6    6    8    7    7    3    3    3    1     1
attr(,"levels")
[1] "No Layer" "1"        "2"        "3"        "1-2"      "1-3"
       "2-3"      "1-2-3"   

> XX <- raster(ncol=10,nrow=10)
> XX[] <- X
> plot(XX)

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Nice! That is exactly what I had in mind. I guess the only question now is whether it's possible to do this faster, and/or using less memory. Thanks for the answer. –  Benjamin Apr 18 '11 at 14:56
    
@Benjamin : Updated using Nicks approach and matrix multiplication. If this is what you're looking for, thank Nick. –  Joris Meys Apr 19 '11 at 8:51
    
Hey, I wasn't the one who let sleep over it :-) The honor is all yours. –  Nick Sabbe Apr 19 '11 at 10:47
    
Thanks, that's very fast, and pretty good on memory (with return.stack=F, anyways). –  Benjamin Apr 19 '11 at 13:35
    
@Benjamin : obviously. When returning a stack, you create in your test case 34 matrices of 1000x1000, which is indeed filling up the memory quite nicely. That option is only there to extract the separate layers. –  Joris Meys Apr 19 '11 at 13:41

I'm not familiar with raster, but from what I grasp from the above, you essentially have a 10*3000*3000 array, right?

If so, for each position in the raster (second and third indices, currow and curcol), you can calculate a unique identifier for its 'zone' by using binary: run i over the 'bands' (first index) and sum r[i,currow, curcol]*2^(i-1). Depending on the internal workings of raster, it should be possible to have a rather quick implementation of this.

This results in a new 'raster' of size 3000*3000 holding the unique identifiers of each position. Finding the unique values in there gives you back the zones that actually occur in your data, and reversing the binary logic should give you the bands that belong to a given zone.

Pardon me if my interpretation of raster is incorrect: then please ignore my musings. Either way not a complete solution.

share|improve this answer
    
This gives me an identifier for the number of bands present at a pixel, not a unique identifier of which bands. I should get a different identifier for when (only) bands 3 and 10 are present than when (only) bands 4 and 5 are present, as example, but in your case I get the same number. –  Benjamin Apr 18 '11 at 14:22
    
I don't think so: when band 3 and 10 are present, you get 2^2+2^9, and for bands 4 and 5, you get 2^3+2^4. But once again, I may be missing the point totally. –  Nick Sabbe Apr 18 '11 at 14:37
    
Sorry, actually that works nicely, and very fast. Just need to re-assign each layer to a value of 2^i, then take the sum of all bands. Now I just need to figure out how to identify which bands from that number. Cool! –  Benjamin Apr 18 '11 at 15:03

How about this?

library(raster)
#setting up some data

r <- raster(nr=10, nc=10)
r[]=0
r[c(20:60,90:93)] <- 1
s <- list(r)
r[]=0
r[c(40:70,93:98)] <- 1
s <- c(s, r)
r[]=0
r[50:95] <- 1
s <- (c(s, r))
plot(stack(s))

# write a vectorized function that classifies the data
# 
fun=function(x,y,z)cbind(x+y+z==0, x==1&y+z==0, y==1&x+z==0, z==1&x+y==0, x==0&y+z==2, y==0&x+z==2, z==0&x+y==2,x+y+z==3)

z <- overlay(s[[1]], s[[2]], s[[3]], fun=fun)
# equivalent to
#s <- stack(s)
#z <- overlay(s[[1]], s[[2]], s[[3]], fun=fun)

ln <- c("x+y+z==0", "x==1&y+z==0", "y==1&x+z==0", "z==1&x+y==0", "x==0&y+z==2", "y==0&x+z==2", "z==0&x+y==2", "x+y+z==3")
layerNames(z) <- ln
x11()
plot(z)

more generic:

s <- stack(s)
fun=function(x)as.numeric(paste(which(x==1), collapse=""))
x <- calc(s,fun)

this is not good when nlayers(s) has double digits ("1", "2" is the same as "12", and in those cases you could use the function below (fun2) instead:

fun2=function(x)as.numeric(paste(c(9, x), collapse=""))
x2 <- calc(s,fun2)

unique(x)
# [1]   1   2   3  12  13  23 123

unique(x2)
# [1] 9000 9001 9010 9011 9100 9101 9110 9111

for the toy example only:

plot(x)
text(x)
p=rasterToPolygons(x)
plot(p, add=T)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. Of course this is fast, it's a 10x10 raster with only 3 layers! Is there a simple way to expand this to be able to handle n layers? I don't mean to be harsh, it's just that this does not quite solve the problem (although it works for this specific case). –  Benjamin Apr 18 '11 at 13:14
    
The example was not made for speed, but to illustrates how you should approach this with raster. The idea is to write your own function like "fun" and then use this with 'raster' functions like overlay or calc. Avoid functions like 'findBounds' as in Joris example, that operate on the whole raster at once, and use getValues() as that gets you into memory problems. –  RobertH Apr 19 '11 at 4:46

I've written code for @Nick Sabbe's suggestion, which I think is very concise and relatively fast. This assumes that the input rasterStack already has logical 1 or 0 data:

# Set the channels to 2^i instead of 1
bands = nlayers(myraster)
a = stack()
for (i in 1:bands) {
  a = addLayer(a, myraster[[i]] * 2^i)
}
coded = sum(a)
#plot(coded)
values = unique(coded)[-1]
remove(a, myraster)

# Function to retrieve which coded value means which channels
which_bands = function(value) {
  single = numeric()
  for (i in bands:1) {
    if ((0 < value) & (value >= 2^i)) {
     value = value - 2^i
      single = c(single, i)
    }
  }
  return(single)
}
share|improve this answer
    
notice the i-1 in Nicks suggestion... –  Joris Meys Apr 19 '11 at 0:42
    
@Joris Meys: I couldn't figure out why that was necessary. Is there a case where it makes a difference? I thought he was just doing that because he thought there was a band 0... –  Benjamin Apr 19 '11 at 1:13
1  
Doesn't make much difference for your case. However, if the number of bands would get a lot bigger, you would bump into the limits of integers in R pretty soon, so I would advise on keeping it as low as possible. Since there is (supposedly) no band 0, I can shift all indices down. –  Nick Sabbe Apr 19 '11 at 7:44
    
you can speed up using matrix multiplication. See my updated answer. –  Joris Meys Apr 19 '11 at 9:26
    
You can also do: v <- 2^(1:nlayers(myraster)); x <- sum(myraster * v) #or z <- calc(myraster, fun=function(x)sum(x * v)) –  RobertH Apr 19 '11 at 16:19

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