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I am trying to return a Guid value below. However the database(and my dbml) has that column as a nullable Guid and it is generating an exception on the .Select portion saying it can't convert from an IQueryable<System.Guid?> to a System.Guid.

I am guessing I need to make my return value "concrete" first???? True?
If so how do I do that with Guid's?

public static Guid GetCurrentWorkerByType(int enrollmentID, int staffTypeID)
{
    using (var context = CmoDataContext.Create())
    {
        IQueryable<tblWorkerHistory> tWorkHist = context.GetTable<tblWorkerHistory>();

        return (tWorkHist.Where(workHist => 
            (workHist.EnrollmentID == enrollmentID) &&
            (workHist.tblStaff.StaffTypeID == staffTypeID) &&
            (workHist.EndDate == null || workHist.EndDate > DateTime.Now))
            .Select(workHist => workHist.Worker));
        }
    }
}
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Does public static Guid? work? –  Austin Salonen Apr 14 '11 at 19:39
    
What do you want to return if the database column row value is null then? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Apr 14 '11 at 19:39
    
Austin Salonen - not it wouldn't –  James Kyburz Apr 14 '11 at 19:50

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted
// Get the Guid? itself, for sake of example from IQueryable<Guid?>
// (could be `null` from DB value or because queryable was empty)
Guid? maybeGuid = queryable.FirstOrDefault();
// Need to have *a* GUID or default it to something
// because a Guid is a value-type and needs *a* value.
Guid theGuid = maybeGuid ?? Guid.Empty;

Also see Nullable<T>.HasValue/Value -- A longer, but equivalent, method would be:

Guid theGuid = maybeGuid.HasValue ? maybeGuid.Value : Guid.Empty;     

Observe that HasValue may be suitable in general if statements to change logic and also note that Value will throw an exception if maybeGuid is "has no value" -- is null -- which is why the guard is required.

Happy coding.


Pedantic detail: The equivalent method is not "thread safe". That is, assuming maybeGuid was shared, it could be assigned null between HasValue and Value. There are a number of SO questions that cover the "thread safety" of ?? (the coalesce operator) -- the generated IL effectively uses a temporary variable so the value may be stale but an exception can't be thrown.

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+1 very clear and consise! –  Chase Florell Apr 14 '11 at 19:49

Use

.Select(workHist => workHist.Worker).Single();
  • .Select() returns a query that has not run.
  • If you use .Select().ToList() then you you return a list.
  • If you use .Select().Single() then you return one item and it makes sure only one item is there
  • If you use .Select().SingleOrDefault() then you return one item and default. Query must not contain more than 1 item.
  • If you use .Select().First() then you return the first item. Query must contain at least 1 item.
  • If you use .Select().FirstOrDefault() then you return the first item or default. Query can contain 1 or more or no items.
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Try
Change your return type from System.Guid to ?System.Guid // nullable of guid Then add .FirstOrDefault() after the select call

A struct cannot be null, but the System.Nullable class wraps the struct in a class.

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What you've got is a query that hasn't executed for one, and for two, it will return a list of Guids as far as I can tell. If you want to return the first Guid or default (which I believe is a zero'd out guid) you can say .FirstorDefault() after your select.

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The closest you will get representing null with a Guid is to use Guid.Empty. So, for your query, you will probably want to first pick the value returned by FirstOrDefault, make a null check, and then return a reasnable value:

Guid? result = tWorkHist.Where(workHist => 
                   (workHist.EnrollmentID == enrollmentID) 
                   && (workHist.tblStaff.StaffTypeID == staffTypeID) 
                   && (workHist.EndDate == null || workHist.EndDate > DateTime.Now))
                   .Select(workHist => workHist.Worker)
                   .FirstOrDefault();

return result.HasValue ? result.Value : Guid.Empty;
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+1 Why the downvote here? Other than the fact that it could use the null-coalescing ?? operator instead of the more verbose ternary syntax (and also avoid the temp variable as a result), I don't see what's wrong with this considering the other answers. –  Adam Robinson Apr 14 '11 at 19:47
    
@Adam: I assume that it came from the first version of the text answering the question in the title (basically the first sentence). The downvote came while I formatted the code sample. –  Fredrik Mörk Apr 14 '11 at 19:50
    
Guid.Empty is not null so it return 00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000 when the database had null –  James Kyburz Apr 14 '11 at 19:58
    
whoah, two down votes. lame sauce. –  Chase Florell Apr 14 '11 at 19:58
    
@James: I have not made any claim that Guid.Empty is null (it obviously can't be,Guid being a value type). But the question is How to return a 'Guid' from a 'Nullable<Guid>'? Given that scenario, I would say that Guid.Empty represents the one value that seem most logical to use as a substitution for a null value. Clearly, if you truly want to represent a null value, changing the return type to Guid? is the way to go, but there may be any number of reasons that makes such a change not being an option. –  Fredrik Mörk Apr 14 '11 at 20:05

Use FirstOrDefault with conjunticon with Guid.Empty

Try this:

public static Guid GetCurrentWorkerByType(int enrollmentID, int staffTypeID)
{
 using (var context = CmoDataContext.Create())
 {
  IQueryable<tblWorkerHistory> tWorkHist = context.GetTable<tblWorkerHistory>();
    var guid = (tWorkHist.Where(workHist => (workHist.EnrollmentID == enrollmentID) && 
                    (workHist.tblStaff.StaffTypeID == staffTypeID) &&(workHist.EndDate == null || workHist.EndDate > DateTime.Now))
        .Select(workHist => workHist.Worker)
     ///####NOTICE THE USE OF FirstOrDefault
        ).FirstOrDefault();
    return (guid.HasValue)?guid.Value:Guid.Empty
    }
}
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