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Consider the class below that represents a Broker:

public class Broker
{
    public string Name = string.Empty;
    public int Weight = 0;

    public Broker(string n, int w)
    {
        this.Name = n;
        this.Weight = w;
    }
}

I'd like to randomly select a Broker from an array, taking into account their weights.

What do you think of the code below?

class Program
    {
        private static Random _rnd = new Random();

        public static Broker GetBroker(List<Broker> brokers, int totalWeight)
        {
            // totalWeight is the sum of all brokers' weight

            int randomNumber = _rnd.Next(0, totalWeight);

            Broker selectedBroker = null;
            foreach (Broker broker in brokers)
            {
                if (randomNumber <= broker.Weight)
                {
                    selectedBroker = broker;
                    break;
                }

                randomNumber = randomNumber - broker.Weight;
            }

            return selectedBroker;
        }


        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<Broker> brokers = new List<Broker>();
            brokers.Add(new Broker("A", 10));
            brokers.Add(new Broker("B", 20));
            brokers.Add(new Broker("C", 20));
            brokers.Add(new Broker("D", 10));

            // total the weigth
            int totalWeight = 0;
            foreach (Broker broker in brokers)
            {
                totalWeight += broker.Weight;
            }

            while (true)
            {
                Dictionary<string, int> result = new Dictionary<string, int>();

                Broker selectedBroker = null;

                for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
                {
                    selectedBroker = GetBroker(brokers, totalWeight);
                    if (selectedBroker != null)
                    {
                        if (result.ContainsKey(selectedBroker.Name))
                        {
                            result[selectedBroker.Name] = result[selectedBroker.Name] + 1;
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            result.Add(selectedBroker.Name, 1);
                        }
                    }
                }


                Console.WriteLine("A\t\t" + result["A"]);
                Console.WriteLine("B\t\t" + result["B"]);
                Console.WriteLine("C\t\t" + result["C"]);
                Console.WriteLine("D\t\t" + result["D"]);

                result.Clear();
                Console.WriteLine();
                Console.ReadLine();
            }
        }
    }

I'm not so confident. When I run this, Broker A always gets more hits than Broker D, and they have the same weight.

Is there a more accurate algorithm?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Hello sir, I saw your question and got inspired to create my own adrotator class in Java using your algorithm. I kindly request you to explain how you would select the brokers from the database if you had a million brokers on the database stored in a wide row. Will I select the first n and apply your algorithm to pick a random broker and on the next request select the next n brokers starting from n+1 and so on? –  qualebs Sep 9 '13 at 16:14
    
I wrote a library along very similar lines... It's has a few additional features, and it's optimized for large data sets: github.com/kinetiq/Ether.WeightedSelector –  Brian MacKay Nov 25 at 19:29

6 Answers 6

up vote 27 down vote accepted

Your algorithm is nearly correct. However, the test should be < instead of <=:

if (randomNumber < broker.Weight)

This is because 0 is inclusive in the random number while totalWeight is exclusive. In other words, a broker with weight 0 would still have a small chance of being selected – not at all what you want. This accounts for broker A having more hits than broker D.

Other than that, your algorithm is fine and in fact the canonical way of solving this problem.

share|improve this answer
    
will this also work with weights that are double precision values? –  Jordan Jan 3 '12 at 22:56
    
@Jordan It will, up to the precision of double. However, the above code uses _rnd.Next which only works on integer ranges. To use a double range, you need to use the appropriate method for generating a number from a double range. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 3 '12 at 23:03
    
I know. Random has a NextDouble method that returns a double between 0.0 and 1.0. I can just multiply this value by the total weight. :) Thanks. –  Jordan Jan 3 '12 at 23:09
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var books = new List<Book> {
        new Book{Isbn=1,Name="A",Weight=1},
        new Book{Isbn=2,Name="B",Weight=100},
        new Book{Isbn=3,Name="C",Weight=1000},
        new Book{Isbn=4,Name="D",Weight=10000},
        new Book{Isbn=5,Name="E",Weight=100000}};

        Book randomlySelectedBook = WeightedRandomization.Choose(books);
    }
}

public class WeightedRandomization
{
    public static T Choose<T>(List<T> list) where T : IWeighted
    {
        if (list.Count == 0)
        {
            return default(T);
        }

        int totalweight = list.Sum(c => c.Weight);
        Random rand = new Random();
        int choice = rand.Next(totalweight);
        int sum = 0;

        foreach (var obj in list)
        {
            for (int i = sum; i < obj.Weight + sum; i++)
            {
                if (i >= choice)
                {
                    return obj;
                }
            }
            sum += obj.Weight;
        }

        return list.First();
    }
}

public interface IWeighted
{
    int Weight { get; set; }
}

public class Book : IWeighted
{
    public int Isbn { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Weight { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer

An alternative method favours speed when selecting the broker over memory usage. Basically we create the list containing the same number of references to a broker instance as the specified weight.

List<Broker> brokers = new List<Broker>();
for (int i=0; i<10; i++)
    brokers.Add(new Broker("A", 10));
for (int i=0; i<20; i++)
    brokers.Add(new Broker("B", 20));
for (int i=0; i<20; i++)
    brokers.Add(new Broker("C", 20));
for (int i=0; i<10; i++)
    brokers.Add(new Broker("D", 10));

Then, to select a randomly weighted instance is an O(1) operation:

int randomNumber = _rnd.Next(0, brokers.length);
selectedBroker = brokers[randomNumber];
share|improve this answer
1  
Yet another alternative that won't cost so much memory would be to use indexes into the Broker array. –  HRJ Dec 25 '10 at 15:22

How about something a little more generic, that can be used for any data type?

using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public static class IEnumerableExtensions {

    public static T RandomElementByWeight<T>(this IEnumerable<T> sequence, Func<T, float> weightSelector) {
        float totalWeight = sequence.Sum(weightSelector);
        // The weight we are after...
        float itemWeightIndex =  new Random().NextDouble * totalWeight;
        float currentWeightIndex = 0;

        foreach(var item in from weightedItem in sequence select new { Value = weightedItem, Weight = weightSelector(weightedItem) }) {
            currentWeightIndex += item.Weight;

            // If we've hit or passed the weight we are after for this item then it's the one we want....
            if(currentWeightIndex >= itemWeightIndex)
                return item.Value;

        }

        return default(T);

    }

}

Simply call by

    Dictionary<string, float> foo = new Dictionary<string, float>();
    foo.Add("Item 25% 1", 0.5f);
    foo.Add("Item 25% 2", 0.5f);
    foo.Add("Item 50%", 1f);

    for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        Console.WriteLine(this, "Item Chosen {0}", foo.RandomElementByWeight(e => e.Value));
share|improve this answer

If you want more speed you can either consider weighted reservoir sampling where you don't have to find the total weight ahead of time (but you sample more often from the random number generator). The code might look something like

Broker selected = null;
int s = 0;
foreach(Broker broker in brokers) {
    s += broker.Weight;
    if (broker.Weight <= _rnd.Next(0,s)) {
        selected = broker;
    }
}

This requires going once through the list brokers. However if the list of brokers is fixed or doesn't change that often you can keep an array of cumulative sums, i.e. A[i] is the sum of weights of all brokers 0,..,i-1. Then A[n] is the total weight and if you pick a number between 1 and A[n-1], say x you find the broker j s.t. A[j-1] <= x < A[j]. For convenience you let A[0] = 0. You can find this broker number j in log(n) steps using binary search, I'll leave the code as an easy exercise. If your data changes frequently this might not be a good way to go since every time some weight changes you might need to update a large portion of the array.

share|improve this answer

I've come up with a generic version of this solution:

public static class WeightedEx
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Select an item from the given sequence according to their respective weights.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="TItem">Type of item item in the given sequence.</typeparam>
    /// <param name="a_source">Given sequence of weighted items.</param>
    /// <returns>Randomly picked item.</returns>
    public static TItem PickWeighted<TItem>(this IEnumerable<TItem> a_source)
        where TItem : IWeighted
    {
        Random rand = new Random();

        if (!a_source.Any())
            return default(TItem);

        double dTotalWeight = a_source.Sum(i => i.Weight);

        while (true)
        {
            double dRandom = rand.NextDouble() * dTotalWeight;

            foreach (var item in a_source)
            {
                if (dRandom < item.Weight)
                    return item;

                dRandom -= item.Weight;
            }
        }
    }
}

/// <summary>
/// IWeighted: Implementation of an item that is weighted.
/// </summary>
public interface IWeighted
{
    double Weight { get; }
}
share|improve this answer

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