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Trying to dynamically load a class:

    require_once(PATH_MODULES."/{$module}/{$module}_admin.php");        
    $admin_class = $module."Admin";     
    return $admin_class::get_admin($module);

Produces this error on older versions of PHP:

Parse error: syntax error, unexpected
T_PAAMAYIM_NEKUDOTAYIM in 
/home/user/public_html/folder/path/admin/filename.php on line 91 

How can I change this code to work for older versions of PHP?

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duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/2491746/… –  Gonzalo Larralde Apr 14 '11 at 20:38

4 Answers 4

I would say, go with a factory pattern similar to what you have done in your own answer.

One way would be

static class ModuleFactory
{
  static public function get($moduleName) {
    if(file_exists($moduleName)) {
      $module= new $moduleName;
      return $module;
    }
    else {
      throw new Exception("Unkown module $moduleName");
    }
  }
}

Then you do

$fooBar = ModuleFactory::get("foobar");

I don't like string identifiers and try to avoid them when ever possible. So if you already knew all the modules you could do

static class ModuleFactory
{
  const FOO = "foo";
  const BAR = "bar";

  static public function get($moduleName) {
    if(file_exists($moduleName . '.php')) {
      $module= new $moduleName;
      return $module;
    }
    else {
      throw new Exception("Unkown module $moduleName");
    }
  }
}

And you would then be able to do

$fooBar = ModuleFactory::get(ModuleFactory::FOO);

This would reduce the chance of getting the spelling wrong.

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In PHP <5.3 you can use call_user_func:

return call_user_func(array($admin_class, 'get_admin'), $module);
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Answer was pretty simple:

    $admin_class = $module."Admin";

    $oAdmin = new $admin_class;

    return $oAdmin->get_admin($module);
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at-byte.com/technology/tpaamayimnekudotayim-php-error For Reference –  tlunter May 18 '11 at 16:17
2  
What you do is not equivalent to what you do in your question. Here you call an object method, in your question you call a (static) class method. –  NikiC May 19 '11 at 14:22

The problem as you probably expected, is that you cannot use dynamic class-names in PHP < 5.3. That's why the :: is unexpected after the variable.

I don't see any way to go around this. You're not allowed to do this:

 $admin_class::get_admin($module);

If this part is always the same:

$admin_class = $module."Admin";     
return $admin_class::get_admin($module);

You could (and this is a hack!) add these strings to that module with the module name filled in ofcourse. Or make a separate file for that?

So for module "yourModule" you add to the "/yourModule/yourModule_admin.php" file these lines:

$admin_class = "yourModuleAdmin";     
return yourModuleAdmin::get_admin($module);

Or add a separate file that you call yourModule_admin.olderversions.php

Not too pretty, I agree.

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