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There are many cases in which JavaScript's type-coercing equality operator is not transitive. (See, for instance, JavaScript equality transitivity is weird....) But are there any cases in which it isn't symmetric—that is, where a == b is true but b == a is false?

Edit: In my original question, I mistakenly said "reflexive" rather than "symmetric." Thanks to all who corrected me on this point.

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3 Answers

up vote 22 down vote accepted

You have the wrong term.

Reflexive means a != a.
The Javascript == relation is almost always reflexive, except that NaN != NaN.


The word you're looking is symmetric.
In Javascript, == is always symmetric.

The spec says:

NOTE 2 The equality operators maintain the following invariants:

  • A != B is equivalent to !(A == B).
  • A == B is equivalent to B == A, except in the order of evaluation of A and B.
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Shouldn't that be commutative? –  Shtééf Apr 14 '11 at 20:50
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@Shtééf: Maybe it should be, but it isn't. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symmetric_relation Relations aren't operators. –  SLaks Apr 14 '11 at 20:52
    
Thanks for the correction—it's been too long since I picked up that math degree! –  Trevor Burnham Apr 14 '11 at 21:32
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It's supposed to be symmetric. However, there is an asymmetric case in some versions of IE:

window == document; // true
document == window; // false
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Wow, that's amazing. Could you specify which versions of IE this occurs in? –  Trevor Burnham Apr 14 '11 at 21:35
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The answer to your actual question (is the operator symmetric) is yes. The ECMA-262 spec explicitly states:

NOTE 2 The equality operators maintain the following invariants:

  • A != B is equivalent to !(A == B).
  • A == B is equivalent to B == A, except in the order of evaluation of A and B.
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You can find a deep-linkable HTML version of the spec at ecma262-5.com –  SLaks Apr 14 '11 at 20:53
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