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We have two web applications and each one is creating it's own data context for EF. When I make changes to an entity in one app I see the changes on the page and in the database when I view the data in SQL Server Mangement Studio. However, I don't immediately see the changes in the other application.

Both apps use dependency injection and both applications use the same business layer and data layer. So the UI in both apps go through a common controller class (not to be confused with MVC controllers) and the controller goes through the repository for the entity it is retrieving. Because they are different apps they each have their own instance of entity framework data context.

If there is some kind of caching, how might I turn that off?

Thanks in advance.

EDIT - Maybe the caching is ocurring somewhere above EF? Clearing my browser cache doesn't seem to fix the issue. After some time goes by I will suddenly see the update to the record in the other app, but for a while no amount of refreshing will show me the updates.

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If the caching is occurring in the context, the cached values should go away when you dispose of the context at the end of the current HTTP request. You do have a per-request context, right? –  Joel Mueller Apr 14 '11 at 21:15
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Hmmm. I think you just made me realize the issue. Will you post that as an answer please? –  Chev Apr 14 '11 at 21:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If the caching is occurring in the context, the cached values should go away when you dispose of the context at the end of the current HTTP request. You do have a per-request context, right?

Here's some context lifetime best practices.

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kernel.Bind<IVendorBriefRepository>().To<VendorBriefRepository>().InSingletoneS‌​cope(); was the culprit. Ninject was only creating one instance of the underlying repository and using that same instance for as long as it could. The repository is what creates the instance of EF's data context. kernel.Bind<IVendorBriefRepository>().To<VendorBriefRepository>().InRequestScop‌​e(); Fixed the issue. Thanks! –  Chev Apr 14 '11 at 21:20
    
Glad to hear it! –  Joel Mueller Apr 14 '11 at 21:21
    
I had an interesting one - which makes sense when you think it through, but was a gotcha for me. My repository layer was using InRequestScope, but my service layer was not (defaulting to InSingletonScope) and so the repositories were staying in memory and not refreshing the context. –  Peter Munnings Jun 6 '13 at 20:21

Yes, contexts cache their results.

You should be creating a new context with every query (or implement something like NHibernate's Session-per-request)

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I did a webapp creating a new context for each query, but the context is not empty after each creation, see my question stackoverflow.com/questions/5977585/… what's your opinion ? –  remi bourgarel May 12 '11 at 12:05

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