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I have a lot of lists like the following:

/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[1]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[2]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[2]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[3]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[3]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[4]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[4]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[5]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[5]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[6]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[2]/div[1]/div[6]/div[1]/div[2]/ul[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[7]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[2]/div[1]/div[6]/div[1]/div[2]/ul[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[8]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[8]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[9]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[9]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[10]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[10]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[11]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[2]/div[1]/div[6]/div[1]/div[2]/ul[2]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[12]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[12]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[13]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[13]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[14]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[14]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[15]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[15]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[16]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[16]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[17]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[2]/div[1]/div[6]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[18]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[18]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[19]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[19]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[20]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[20]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[21]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[2]/div[1]/div[6]/div[1]/div[2]/ul[2]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[22]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[22]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[23]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[23]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[24]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[24]/div[2]/div[4]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[25]/div[2]/h4[1]
/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[25]/div[2]/div[4]

And I need to extract the portion that is most repeated in each line, which in this case is

/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li

What's the best way to do this?

I'm using C#/.net

thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Your question does not make sense. –  Aliostad Apr 14 '11 at 21:48
    
Does the "most repeated" section that you want always start at the beginning of each line? –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 14 '11 at 21:49
3  
Do you mean the most repeated line? The most repeated portion (substring?) would be / –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Apr 14 '11 at 21:52
1  
Wouldn't "/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/" be the portion that is most repeated, since it appears on every line? I don't understand the question. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 14 '11 at 21:56
1  
Do you want the rectangle of the largest area that is flush on the left in which every row is identical over the sorted list? –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 14 '11 at 22:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If I understand your question correctly, what you want is the longest common prefix of all lines. You could obtain it by doing something like that:

void Main()
{
    string path = @"D:\tmp\so5670107.txt";
    string[] lines = File.ReadAllLines(path);
    string prefix = LongestCommonPrefix(lines);
    Console.WriteLine(prefix);
}

static string LongestCommonPrefix(string a, string b)
{
    int length = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < a.Length && i < b.Length; i++)
    {
        if (a[i] == b[i])
            length++;
        else
            break;
    }
    return a.Substring(0, length);
}

static string LongestCommonPrefix(IEnumerable<string> strings)
{
    return strings.Aggregate(LongestCommonPrefix);
}

The result is:

/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[

(the expected result you give in the question seems incorrect, since there are lines that don't match it)

I chose a naive approach for the sake of simplicity, but of course there are more efficient ways of finding the longest common prefix between two strings (using a dichotomic search for instance)

share|improve this answer
    
oh yes, you're right! thanks! –  John Apr 14 '11 at 22:05
    
what's that Dump method?? –  John Apr 14 '11 at 22:07
    
@John, forgot to remove it, sorry... it's an extension method defined in LINQPad, it just prints the variable to the results window. You can use Console.WriteLine instead (I'll update my answer) –  Thomas Levesque Apr 14 '11 at 22:12

You could do this with a loop. Assumption is that your list of strings is in a collection called paths:

var countByPath = new Dictionary<string, int>();
foreach (var path in paths)
{
    if (!countByPath.ContainsKey(path))
    {
        countByPath[path] = 1;
    }
    else
    {
        countByPath[path]++;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The longest substring that is repeated in the list? Assumption is that your list of strings is in a collection called paths:

var currentChoice = "";
foreach (var path in paths)
{
    for (int i = path.Length; i > 0; i--)
    {
        var candidate = path.Substring(0, i);
        if (i > currentChoice.Length &&
            paths.Count(p => p.StartsWith(candidate)) > 1)
            currentChoice = candidate;
        else
            break;
    }
}
Console.WriteLine(currentChoice);

The result is then

/html[1]/body[1]/div[5]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/div[1]/div[3]/div[1]/div[2]/div[3]/ul[1]/li[10]

since it is repeated twice

share|improve this answer

There is already an algorithm for this. I can't remember what it's called, but if you are interested in language independent implementation. It works in the following way:

  1. Read first line
  2. Read second line. If second line is the same as first line, than increase counter by one, otherwise keep counter at zero.
  3. Carry on reading lines, if three lines are the same (i.e. repeat), than your counter will be 2. If next line is different to the previous three, than decrease counter by 1.

E.g.

String1 - Counter: 0 String1 - Counter: 1 (Store String1 in a variable) String1 - Counter: 2 (Store String1 in same variable) String2 - Counter: 1 (Still store String1 in variable)

I hope this makese sense. I did this at uni few years ago. Can't remember mathematician who came up with algorithm, but it's fairly old.

share|improve this answer

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