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I have this problem with signal():

This code compiles fine:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <signal.h>

void terminate( int param )
{
  printf ( "Terminating program...\n" );
  exit( 1 );
}

int main()
{
    signal( SIGTERM, terminate );
    return 0;
}

This, however, throws the error

g++ -Wall -c -g goober.cpp
goober.cpp: In member function `void GOOBER::yarrgh()':
goober.cpp:5: error: argument of type `void (GOOBER::)(int)' does not match `
   void (*)(int)'
make: *** [goober.o] Error 1

goober.h:

#ifndef GOOBER_H
#define GOOBER_H

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <signal.h>

using namespace std;

class GOOBER {
public:
    GOOBER(){}
    ~GOOBER(){}
    void yarrgh();
    void terminate( int param );
};

#endif

goober.cpp:

#include "goober.h"

void GOOBER::yarrgh()
{
    signal( SIGTERM, terminate );
}

void GOOBER::terminate( int param )
{
    printf( "Terminating program...\n" );
    exit( 1 );
}

driver.cpp:

#include "goober.h"

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    GOOBER G;
    G.yarrgh();

    return 0;
}

I don't see any difference in the code, other than I'm calling signal in a class. Any ideas what's wrong, and how to fix it?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You need to declare your terminate() function as static:

class GOOBER {
    // ...
    static void terminate(int param);
};

This is because that as a non-static member function, the terminate() function expects to be passed the (hidden) this parameter to point to some instance of the object. Since the signal mechanism doesn't know about this (or about anything much of C++), you need to use a static function so that there is no hidden this parameter.

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1  
Wow, you stackoverflowers are incredible. Many, many, many thanks! –  Dribbler Apr 14 '11 at 22:40
    
I would not trust a static member to have the correct linkage requirements for a C function. –  Loki Astari Apr 15 '11 at 0:32

Member function have different signature from normal function that not belong any class. However, static member function have the same signature with normal function. So, you could declare your terminate member function in GOOBER class as static.

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I can tell you what's wrong:

You cannot use a non-static member function like a normal function pointer. Member functions always have an implicit this argument, which is provided (implicitly) by the caller. A C API cannot do this.

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Terminate has to be a static function in the class.

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