Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to write some code to look through an image file for groups of pixels that are the same color.

The way I do this is I iterate through the image (in the form of a 1d integer array with the color's hash code) by pixel to find a pixel of the color that I'm searching for. Once one is found, I do a dfs to find adjacent pixels of the same color and add them to a new object I called a Blob. I use a boolean array to keep track of which pixels have already been added so I don't add identical blobs.

I'm using ArrayList for each Blob object to keep track of the pixel numbers. And then I use another ArrayList of Blobs to store the different groups.

When I try to run this on a simple example, a picture with the top half white and the bottom half bottom, I get a stack overflow error when I try to use a picture that's too large. Specifically, when I try to do this with a 320x240 image, I get the stackoverflow once 2752 pixels are added to the blob.

Am I just not using the right data structure for what I want to do? I read that ArrayLists can store Integer.maxValue objects in them.

My code is pasted below. Any help is greatly appreciated.

//blobfind tests code to find similar pixels of a minimum size and groups them together for analysis later  
//purpose is to identify color coded objects through the webcam  

//util for ArrayList  
import java.util.*;  
import java.awt.Color;  
import java.io.*;  

public class Blobfind2 {  

  //width and height of image in pixels  
  private int width;  
  private int height;  
  //hash code for the color being searched for  
  private int colorCode;  
  //minimum blob size to be added  
  private int minPixels;  
  //image in form of array of hashcodes for each pixel  
  private int[] img;  
  //keeping track of which pixels have been added to a blob  
  private boolean[] added;  
  //keeping track of which pixels have been visited when looking for a new blob  
  private boolean[] visited;  

  //debugging variable  
  private int count;  

  public Blobfind2(int inwidth, int inheight, int inCCode, int inminPixels, int[] inimage)   {
    width = inwidth;  
    height = inheight;  
    colorCode = inCCode;  
    minPixels = inminPixels;  
    img = inimage;  
    count = 0;  
  }    

  //takes hashCodeof color, minimum pixel number, and an image in the form of integer array  
  public ArrayList findColor() {  
    //makes an arraylist of "blobs"  
    ArrayList bloblist = new ArrayList();  
    //keep track of which pixels have been added to a blob  
    boolean[] added = new boolean[width * height];  
    //checks through each pixel  
    for (int i = 0; i < img.length; i++) {  
      //if it matches and is not part of a blob, we run dfs to collect all the pixels in   that blob
      if ((img[i] == colorCode) && (added[i] == false)) {  
        //visited keeps track of which pixels in the blob have been visited  
        //refreshed each time a new blob is made  
        boolean[] visited = new boolean[width*height];  
        Blob currBlob = new Blob();  
        dfs(img, currBlob, i, Color.white.hashCode(), added, visited);  
        //adds the blob to the bloblist if it is of a certain size  
        if (currBlob.mass() >= minPixels) {  
          bloblist.add(currBlob);                          
        }  
      }  
    }  
    return bloblist;  
  }  

  //recursive algorithm to find other members of a blob  
  public void dfs (int[] img, Blob blob, int currPixel, int colorCode, boolean[] added,    boolean[] visited) {  
    //System.out.print(currPixel + " - " + count + " ");   
    count++;  
    //check current pixel, this only happens on the first pixel  
    if (visited[currPixel] == false) {  
      blob.add(img[currPixel]);  
      added[currPixel] = true;  
      visited[currPixel] = true;  
    }  
    //checks down pixel  
    if ((currPixel + width < height*width) && (visited[currPixel + width] == false)) {  
      if (img[currPixel + width] == colorCode) {  
        blob.add(img[currPixel + width]);  
        currPixel = currPixel + width;  
        added[currPixel] = true;  
        visited[currPixel] = true;  
        dfs(img, blob, currPixel, colorCode, added, visited);  
      }  
    }  
    //checks up pixel  
    if ((currPixel - width > 0) && (visited[currPixel - width] == false)) {  
      if (img[currPixel - width] == colorCode) {  
        blob.add(img[currPixel - width]);  
        currPixel = currPixel - width;  
        added[currPixel] = true;  
        visited[currPixel] = true;  
        dfs (img, blob, currPixel, colorCode, added, visited);  
      }  
    }  
    //checks right pixel  
    if ((currPixel + 1 < width * height) && (visited[currPixel + 1] == false) && (((currPixel + 1) % width) != 0)) {  
      if (img[currPixel + 1] == colorCode) {  
        blob.add(img[currPixel + 1]);  
        currPixel = currPixel + 1;  
        added[currPixel] = true;  
        visited[currPixel] = true;  
        dfs(img, blob, currPixel, colorCode, added, visited);  
      }  
    }  
    //checks left pixel  
    if ((currPixel - 1 > 0) && (visited[currPixel - 1] == false) && (((currPixel - 1) % width) != width - 1)) {  
      if (img[currPixel - 1] == colorCode) {  
        blob.add(img[currPixel - 1]);  
        currPixel = currPixel - 1;  
        added[currPixel] = true;  
        visited[currPixel] = true;  
        dfs(img, blob, currPixel, colorCode, added, visited);  
      }  
    }  
    return;  
  }  

  //test case, makes a new image thats half black and half white  
  //should only return one blob of size width*height/2  
  public static void main(String[] args) {  
   int width = 320;  
   int height = 240;  
   //builds the image  
   int[] img = new int[width * height];  
   for (int i = 0; i < img.length; i++) {  
     if (i < img.length/4) {  
       img[i] = Color.white.hashCode();  
     } else {  
       img[i] = Color.black.hashCode();  
     }  
   }  

   //runs blobfind  
   Blobfind2 bf = new Blobfind2(width, height, Color.white.hashCode(), 1, img);  
   ArrayList bloblist = bf.findColor();  
   System.out.println(bloblist.size());  
   //need to typecast things coming out of arraylists  
   Blob firstblob = (Blob)bloblist.get(0);  
   System.out.println(firstblob.mass());  
  }  

 private class Blob {  
   private ArrayList pixels = new ArrayList();  
   private Blob() {  
   }  
   private int mass() {  
     return pixels.size();  
   }  
   private void add(int i) {  
     pixels.add(i);  
   }  
   private ArrayList getBlob() {  
     return pixels;  
   }  
 }  

}   
share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The stack overflow error has nothing to do with whether you use an List, or a Map, or any other particular data structure. Those constructs are allocated on the heap. You are seeing your stack overflow error because you make recursive function calls. Each recursive function call allocates memory on the stack. You can increase your -Xss value (e.g java -Xss8m HelloWorld) or you can re-write your algorithm to be non-recursive (assuming your algorithm is correct).

share|improve this answer
add comment

This looks very similar to a flood-fill algorithm. The recursive implementation might blow the stack (e.g. make too many recursive calls) for large blobs, simply because you have to explore 4 neighbours for every pixel. Worst case is an image all in the same blob!

I would try making the stack explicit. You want to avoid the recursion and use a simple loop based approach instead.

public void dfs () {
     Stack<Pixel> pixels = new Stack<Pixel>();
     pixels.push(currentPixel);

     while (!pixels.isEmpty()) {
         Pixel x = pixels.pop();

         // Do whatever processing on this pixel
         Pixel upPixel = getUpPixel();
         if (upPixel == colorCode) {
             pixels.push(upPixel);
         }

         // And so on
     }

}
share|improve this answer
    
The problem does not relate to "4 neighbours for every pixel", as this relates to the width of the call-tree, not the depth. The same would occur for a 1x76800 image of same color. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Apr 15 '11 at 0:09
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.