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Lets say you having the following code.

 this._tcpListener.Start();

 while (true)
 {
     //blocks until a client has connected to the server
     TcpClient client = this._tcpListener.AcceptTcpClient();

     //create a thread to handle communication 
     //with connected client
     Thread clientThread = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(HandleClientCommunication));
     clientThread.Start(client);
 }


private void HandleClientCommunication(object client)
{
    using (TcpClient tcpClient = (TcpClient) client)
    {
        //Do my work
    }
}

The problem with such an implementation is that whatever port I have used in the initial connection is then used in the client communication and therefor (despite the fact that the tcpListener is still listening it will be unable to accept other connections till the port is freed).

So is there someway to tell the tcpClient to change the port it is working on or is the only way to implement such functionality by sending back the client a new port number and telling it to reconnect?

    IE:

    TcpListener1.AcceptTcpClient(); //Wait
    Thread clientThread = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(HandleClientCommunication));     
    clientThread.Start(client);

    private void HandleClientCommunication(object client)
    {
        using (TcpClient tcpClient = (TcpClient) client)
        {
            //Generate random port number send back to client and create another thread with a new tcpListener and wait again?
        }
    }

Looking at the code it appears that the localendpoint for the client and the remoteendpoint for the server appears to change to a different port yet the inverse in each case stays the same.

IE: 
Started server tcpListener on 121
ClientLocalEndPoint: {127.0.0.1:1380}
ClientRemoteEndPoint: {127.0.0.1:121}
ServerLocalEndPoint: {127.0.0.1:121}
ServerRemoteEndPoint: {127.0.0.1:1380}
share|improve this question
    
check "acceptor" and "event loop" patterns – bobah Apr 15 '11 at 7:13
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are incorrect about the problem here; Spawning a new thread to handle the TcpClient and then looping back to TcpListener.AcceptTcpClient() does not require you to change ports; A single server can get multiple connections in to the same socket.

Otherwise, how would web servers handle multiple users at once?

Something else is going wrong with your code somewhere. Your "thread-per-connection" code is not ideal (a thread per connection is much more than is needed), but it is a quick-and-dirty way that works just fine.

How are you constructing the Listener? What are you doing with the client? And what exactly is happening to subsequent connections?

share|improve this answer
    
I never thought about the point on web servers - silly I know. PS: The code works exactly as intended. I simply never tested it with two clients because I was certain it would not function. – Maxim Gershkovich Apr 15 '11 at 16:00

I agree with others that you might want to look at asynchronous methods instead of using separate threads for each connection, or at least BackgroundWorker... As for what is happening, did you try debugging making sure that you had one thread stuck on the AcceptTcpClient call? You could try specifying a high backlog in your Start() call. Could it be something with scope and maybe garbage collection of your thread because you don't maintain a reference for it? If you put a Thread.Sleep(10000) at the end of your loop, can you connect after 10 seconds? If you try using command line telnet to connect to the port (i.e. "telnet localhost 9999") does the screen blank showing that it connected?

You could try something like adding a hashtable to store your threads and remove them on exit which adds the benefit of having a list of them and being able to close the connections and kill them...

Dictionary<TcpClient, Thread> _threads = new Dictionary<TcpClient, Thread>();
object _lockObject = new object();

void AddThread(TcpClient client, Thread thread)
{
    lock (_lockObject)
    {
        _threads.Add(client, thread);
    }
}

void RemoveThread(TcpClient client)
{
    lock (_lockObject)
    {
        _threads.Remove(client);
    }

}

void YourMainMethod()
{
    this._tcpListener.Start();

    while (true)
    {
         //blocks until a client has connected to the server
         TcpClient client = this._tcpListener.AcceptTcpClient();

         //create a thread to handle communication 
         //with connected client
         Thread clientThread = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(HandleClientCommunication));
         AddThread(client, clientThread);
         clientThread.Start(client);
    }
}


private void HandleClientCommunication(object client)
{
    try
    {
        using (TcpClient tcpClient = (TcpClient) client)
        {
            //Do my work
        }
    } catch (Exception)
    {
         // so program doesn't crash
    }
    finally
    {
        RemoveThread((TcpClient)client);
    }
}
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