Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I convert a string in UTF-8 char* to CString?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Call MultiByteToWideChar with a code page of CP_UTF8, then use CString as normal.

share|improve this answer
    
I want it to be converted to char* not wchar_t *.. Is there any method? –  Greenhorn Apr 15 '11 at 6:49
1  
@Athreya : Why on earth would you want that? That conversion is bound to be lossy -- if the string was Unicode to begin with, what makes you think it contains exclusively ANSI characters? –  ildjarn Apr 15 '11 at 6:53
    
I need to parse and execute the statement using OCI library which only accepts char* as input –  Greenhorn Apr 15 '11 at 6:54
2  
@Athreya : Isn't char* what you already have? In any case, I'm not aware of any "MultiByteToMultiByte" sort of function, so I think you'll have to round-trip it -- call MultiByteToWideChar with CP_UTF8 then WideCharToMultiByte with whatever code page you want the resulting char* in. –  ildjarn Apr 15 '11 at 6:56
bool Utf8ToCString( CString& cstr, const char* utf8Str )
{
    size_t utf8StrLen = strlen(utf8Str);

    if( utf8StrLen == 0 )
    {
        cstr.Empty();
        return true;
    }

    LPTSTR* ptr = cstr.GetBuffer(utf8StrLen+1);

#ifdef UNICODE
    // CString is UNICODE string so we decode
    int newLen = MultiByteToWideChar(
                     CP_UTF8,  0,
                     utf8Str, utf8StrLen,  ptr, utf8StrLen+1
                     );
    if( !newLen )
    {
        cstr.ReleaseBuffer(0);
        return false;
    }
#else
    WCHAR* buf = (WCHAR*)malloc(utf8StrLen);

    if( buf == NULL )
    {
        cstr.ReleaseBuffer(0);
        return false;
    }

    int newLen = MultiByteToWideChar(
                     CP_UTF8,  0,
                     utf8Str, utf8StrLen,  buf, utf8StrLen
                     );
    if( !newLen )
    {
        free(buf);
        cstr.ReleaseBuffer(0);
        return false;
    }

    assert( newLen < utf8StrLen );
    newLen = WideCharToMultiByte(
                     CP_ACP,  0,
                     buf, newLen,  ptr, utf8StrLen
                     );
    if( !newLen )
    {
        free(buf);
        cstr.ReleaseBuffer(0);
        return false;
    }

    free(buf);
#endif

    cstr.ReleaseBuffer(newLen);
    return true;
}

Though this function is valid for both UNICODE and non-UNICODE configurations IMHO using UNICODE configuration in Win32 programs is much more productive (in general and in this function).

share|improve this answer
    
this is not a solution. The solution is to figure out the target single-byte code page and to convert UTF-8 string to single-byte string of that CP. –  Jurlie Apr 15 '11 at 7:13
    
@Jurlie: read the comment before memcpy. Though may be I'll post implementation now. –  Serge Dundich Apr 15 '11 at 7:16
    
Edited the post to include UTF8 to current 8-bit code page conversion. –  Serge Dundich Apr 15 '11 at 7:28
    
now is ok –  Jurlie Apr 15 '11 at 7:32

If your string contains only ASCII-characters with codes 0 to 127 you may threat your UTF-8 string as ASCII string and initialise CString with it:

CString my_cstr((char*)my_string);

Otherwise (if your UTF-8 string contains some other characters) you have no easy way to get char* string from it.

share|improve this answer
    
I've got other characters in the UTF-8 string –  Greenhorn Apr 15 '11 at 7:04
    
@Athreya what is codepage you want to convert your string to? Or what is the language at least? Are you sure your UTF-8 string could be represented as single-byte string at all? –  Jurlie Apr 15 '11 at 7:15
    
@Athreya : Jurlie means losslessly represented as a single-byte string. And your first comment on this answer indicates that this isn't the case. –  ildjarn Apr 15 '11 at 7:23
    
I meant the language of string to convert, not a programming language :-D –  Jurlie Apr 15 '11 at 7:24
    
@Julie the string is Japanese –  Greenhorn Apr 15 '11 at 7:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.