Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have been asked to solve a Cryptarithmetic Puzzle using prolog:

GIVE
* ME 
------
MONEY

The above is the puzzle, I cannot figure out where is the problem, the result always returns false. Plus I am not allowed to use any library in SWI-Prolog.

solve( Z ) :- assign( Z, [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9] ), check( Z ).

find( VAL, G, I, V, E ) :- VAL is G * 1000 + I * 100 + V * 10 + E.
find2( VALR, M, E ) :- VALR is M * 10 + E.
find3( VALA, M, O, N, E, Y ) :- VALA is M * 10000 + O * 1000 + N * 100 + E * 10 + Y.

check( Z ) :- 
    G #>= 1, M #>= 1,
    find( VAL, G, I, V, E ), find2( VALR, M, E ), find3( VALA, M, O, N, E, Y ), VAL * VALR =:= VALA  .

assign( Z, L ) :- permute( L, Z ).

/* permute is similar to all_difference in swi-prolog */
addany(X,K,[X|K]).
addany(X,[F|K],[F|L1]) :- addany(X,K,L1).
permute([],[]).
permute([X|K],P) :- permute(K, L1), addany(X, L1, P).
===============================================================
to solve, we execute solve([G,I,V,E,M,O,N,Y]).
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

The following article by Eric Weisstein and Ed Pegg will be useful. It offers several solutions for a similar problem in Mathematica.

Using a very brute-force approach, there are two solutions: 1072 * 92 = 98624 and 1092 * 72 = 78624. The code that I used:

In[16]:= Cases[
 Permutations[
  Range[0, 9], {5}], {g_, i_, v_, e_, m_} /; g > 0 && m > 0 :> 
  With[{dig = IntegerDigits[(g*10^3 + i*10^2 + v*10 + e) (10 m + e)]},
   Join[{g, i, v, e, m}, dig[[{2, 3, 5}]]] /; 
    And[Length[dig] == 5, Unequal @@ dig, dig[[{1, 4}]] == {m, e}, 
     Intersection[dig[[{2, 3, 5}]], {g, i, v, e, m}] === {} ]
   ]]

Out[16]= {{1, 0, 7, 2, 9, 8, 6, 4}, {1, 0, 9, 2, 7, 8, 6, 4}}
share|improve this answer
    
Well, Mathematica is not very similar to Prolog. (Actually, no language other than Prolog is very similar to Prolog, for that matter….) [In fact the bug in OP's code is probably in "permute", so something like Mathematica's in-built Permutations is out of the OP's scope.] –  ShreevatsaR Apr 17 '11 at 20:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.