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Say we have a concrete class A, and an abstract class B.

Consider a concrete C, that inherits from both A and B, and implements B:

class C : public A, public B  
{  
/* implementation of B and specific stuff that belongs to C */  
};

Now I define a function which signature is void foo(B* b);

This is my code, I can assume that every pointers to B are both A and B. In foo's definition, how to get a pointer to A? A nasty but working trick is to align back pointers like so:

void foo(B* b)  
{  
    A* a = reinterpret_cast<A*>(reinterpret_cast<char*>(b) - sizeof(A));
    // now I can use all the stuff from A  
}

Keep in mind that C does not have a super type and actually, there are many classes akin to C which only are A and B. Feel free to question both my logic and this sample of design as well but the question is only concerning pointers alignment.

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3  
The result of any attempt to get an A from a B is almost certainly undefined. Why do you want to do this? –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 15 '11 at 7:35
    
It's perfectly defined in this case since I'm sure I get a pointer to B from an instance of C. –  mister why Apr 15 '11 at 7:58
    
What you are doing is UB. –  Loki Astari Apr 15 '11 at 11:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted
void foo(B* b)  
{  
    //A* a = reinterpret_cast<A*>(reinterpret_cast<char*>(b) - sizeof(A)); // undefined behaviour!!!!
    A* a = dynamic_cast<A*>(b);
    if (a)
    {
       // now I can use all the stuff from A  
    }
    else
    {
       // that was something else, not descended from A
    }
}

Forgot to say: in order to make work dynamic cast both A and B should have virtual desctructors. Otherwise there is no legal way to do that type conversion.

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2  
-1: This will not work. It won't even compile. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 15 '11 at 7:40
    
@Oli Charlesworth: I don't think you are familiar to C++ enough to make such conclusions. –  Jurlie Apr 15 '11 at 7:42
    
@Jurlie: Then try compiling this. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 15 '11 at 7:43
1  
@Oli Charlesworth : This compiles and works fine as long as both A and B are polymorphic (i.e., have a vtable). I'm not sure what your contention is... –  ildjarn Apr 15 '11 at 7:48
1  
@mister why : Keep in mind that while this approach may work, it's downright silly. I'd strongly consider the approach suggested by sharptooth. –  ildjarn Apr 15 '11 at 7:58

Having a huge set of unrelated classes that both derive from A and B is a very strange design. If there's something that makes A and B always be "used together" you could either merge them or introduce a shim class that only derives from them and then only derive from that class:

class Shim : A, B {};

class DerivedX : Shim {};

and in the latter case you just use static_cast to first downcast from A or B to Shim* and then C++ it will implicitly convert the Shim* pointer to the other class.

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I got you, but I didn't provide the whole design. Actually B is not always the same abstract class. It can be either an abstract B1 or an abstract B2 that both inherits from B. When I am in foo, I don't know the kind of C I have. A nice design based on templates would force me to use the CRTP idiom which is definitely not convenient for peculiar reasons. –  mister why Apr 15 '11 at 8:04

If you want to use the functionality of both class A and Class B in your function then you should modify the function to receive C pointers:

void foo(C* c);

And in general you are wrong with you assumption that "every B is an A as well". You could create classes derived from you B interface and not derived from Class A, that's why the compiler won't know that in your specific case "every B is an A".

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Well, based on your comment to the previous post I think that your foo function should be examined because it may be two different functions (one is working with descendants of B and the other is working with the class A) and they should be called one after the other. –  szilard.huber Apr 15 '11 at 8:11

Expanding on sharptooth's answer (and entering it as an answer, because I can't get formatted code into a comment), you can still use the shim:

class Shim : public virtual A, public virtual B {};

Then:

class Derived1 : public Shim, public virtual A, public virtual B1
{
};

class Derived2 : public Shim, public virtual A, public virtual B2
{
};

B1 and B2 must derive virtually from B.

But I suspect that if you always need to implement both A and B, you should create a single interface with both, either by inheriting, or coalising both into a single class; your B1 and B2 would inherit from that. (The solution with dynamic_cast, of course, is for the case where the derived class of B may or may not also derived from A.)

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"public Shim, public virtual A" what is the point? –  curiousguy Aug 17 '12 at 3:45

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