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Let say I have the following folders:

New Folder
- New Folder
- New Folder (2)
- New Folder (3)
- New Folder (4)
New Folder (2)
New Folder (3)
New Folder (4)

And a query

from s in Directory.GetDirectories(@"D:\Project\uploads", "*.*", SearchOption.AllDirectories)
select s

The results:

D:\Project\uploads\New Folder
D:\Project\uploads\New Folder (2)
D:\Project\uploads\New Folder (3)
D:\Project\uploads\New Folder (4)
D:\Project\uploads\New Folder\New Folder
D:\Project\uploads\New Folder\New Folder (2)
D:\Project\uploads\New Folder\New Folder (3)
D:\Project\uploads\New Folder\New Folder (4)

Is there anyway to sort the list to the right order? I expected it to be:

D:\Project\uploads\New Folder
D:\Project\uploads\New Folder\New Folder
D:\Project\uploads\New Folder\New Folder (2)
D:\Project\uploads\New Folder\New Folder (3)
D:\Project\uploads\New Folder\New Folder (4)
D:\Project\uploads\New Folder (2)
D:\Project\uploads\New Folder (3)
D:\Project\uploads\New Folder (4)

Any helps would be appreciated!

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The right order being... ? –  sehe Apr 15 '11 at 8:53
    
I've updated the question –  ByulTaeng Apr 15 '11 at 9:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This wasn't as trivial as I thought. Probably the most sane solution (aside from building the list recursively) is to implement a comparer for this to do the sorting.

class DirectorySorter : IComparer<string>
{
    public int Compare(string x, string y)
    {
        return StringComparer.Ordinal.Compare(x.Replace(Path.DirectorySeparatorChar, '\0'),
                                        y.Replace(Path.DirectorySeparatorChar, '\0'));
        var xPaths = x.Split(Path.DirectorySeparatorChar);
        var yPaths = y.Split(Path.DirectorySeparatorChar);
        var minLength = Math.Min(xPaths.Length, yPaths.Length);
        for (int i = 0; i < minLength; i++)
        {
            var ires = xPaths[i].CompareTo(yPaths[i]);
            if (ires != 0) return ires;
        }
        var lres = xPaths.Length.CompareTo(yPaths.Length);
        if (lres == 0)
        {
            return lres;
        }
        else if (lres < 0)
        {
            var i = y.LastIndexOf(Path.DirectorySeparatorChar);
            return x.Length == i ? lres : -lres;
        }
        else //if (lres > 0)
        {
            var i = x.LastIndexOf(Path.DirectorySeparatorChar);
            return y.Length == i ? lres : -lres;
        }
    }
}

(Seeing Steck's answer shows that I was nearly there with what I originally had. Just that I needed to use the Ordinal string comparer. So it turns out it works using that change.)

On the other hand, we could use some properties of the directory structure to simplify this task and not implement a comparer.

var query = Directory
    .EnumerateDirectories(@"D:\Project\uploads", "*", SearchOption.AllDirectories)
    .OrderBy(name => name.Replace(Path.DirectorySeparatorChar, '\0'), StringComparer.Ordinal);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for ur answer but it didn't work. –  ByulTaeng Apr 15 '11 at 9:37
    
@NVA: Yeah I just noticed this... not the order I expected on some inputs. Let me see if I can tweak this. –  Jeff Mercado Apr 15 '11 at 9:39
    
@Byul: I found out how to implement such a comparer. So if you want to do this by sorting, you can use this comparer. p.s., Name change? :) –  Jeff Mercado Apr 15 '11 at 10:45
    
Thanks a lot for ur answer. Works excellent! –  ByulTaeng Apr 15 '11 at 16:14
private class Comparer : IComparer<string>
{
    public int Compare(string x, string y)
    {
        return StringComparer.Ordinal.Compare(x.Replace(Path.DirectorySeparatorChar, '\0'),
                                                y.Replace(Path.DirectorySeparatorChar, '\0'));
    }
}

and then

var source = Directory.GetDirectories(@"D:\Project\uploads", "*.*", SearchOption.AllDirectories)
var target = source.OrderBy(x => x, new Comparer()).ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
Oh man, I had no idea that using the ordinal comparer made a difference, though making a new comparer isn't really necessary here then. –  Jeff Mercado Apr 15 '11 at 10:49
    
yeah. you are right. x => x.Replace(Path.DirectorySeparatorChar, '\0') is a good key selector with StringComparer.Ordinal comparer –  Steck Apr 15 '11 at 10:56

The only thing you need to change about the default ordering is to make sure that the \ character is always treated as the first letter in your alphabet. I don't have an exact answer how to implement this, but:

  • You can use order by clause if you find a way to replace \ in the string with a character that is smaller than all other characters and use this replaced string as the key.

  • You can use Array.Sort and implement your string comparer that re-implements string comparison, but encodes this additional rule about the \ character.

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You can hack your locale cultureinfo for the purpose too. I'd recommend to 'say what you mean' (intentional programming) –  sehe Apr 15 '11 at 9:15

With .NET 4.0 try

 Directory.EnumerateDirectories(@"D:\Project\uploads", "*.*", SearchOption.AllDirectories) 

it might do what you expect. If it doesn't, you can do it explicitly:

 Directory.GetDirectories(@"D:\Project\uploads")
      .SelectMany(dir => dir.GetDirectories().OrderBy(sub => sub.Name))

Lastly you might do something like:

 from s in Directory.GetDirectories(@"D:\Project\uploads", "*.*", SearchOption.AllDirectories)
 order by s.Parent.Name, s.Name
 select s

 from s in Directory.GetDirectories(@"D:\Project\uploads", "*.*", SearchOption.AllDirectories)
 let members = s.Name.Split(new [] {Path.SeparatorChar})
 order by members[2], s.Name
 select s

to get even more control/flexibility. Chose the simplest approach depending on your needs

share|improve this answer
1  
Hmm, didn't think of that one. Does GetDirectories() guarantee returning the directories in sorted order? Otherwise you'd have to sort it. –  Jeff Mercado Apr 15 '11 at 9:10
    
I think that the second version will need to be recursive. –  Tomas Petricek Apr 15 '11 at 9:11
    
@Jeff Good point, updating –  sehe Apr 15 '11 at 9:11
    
@Tomas: I can 'think that too', but it's not explicit anywhere, letting the OP decide –  sehe Apr 15 '11 at 9:13

Thanks for ur comment and answer guys,

I think life'll be much easier with recursive

void Main()
{
    string rootFolder = @"D:\Project\uploads";

    string[] f = Directory.GetDirectories(rootFolder, "*.*", SearchOption.AllDirectories);

    Func<string, string[]> build = null;

    build = (p) => {
        return (from x in f where Path.GetDirectoryName(x) == p
                from y in new string[]{ x }.Union(build(x)) select y).ToArray();
    };

    f = build(rootFolder).Dump();
}
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