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I need to define a foreign key constraint on some table B where a column ID must be in set of table A.ID OR it may be NULL (that would be valid value too).

(A.ID column cannot be NULL at the same time).

Should I use CHECK clause?

UPD: Excuse me, I wrote wrong. I meant:

I need to define a foreign key constraint on some table B where a column ID must be in set of table A.ID OR it may be zero (that would be valid value too).

(A.ID column cannot be zero at the same time).

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3 Answers

Yes.

A foreign key constraint will not work unless you insert a row with A.ID = 0.

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Just make a FOREIGN KEY constraint. B.ID may still be NULL.

You'll find some examples on psoug

I wouldn't recommend to store 0 instead of NULL. 0 has no semantics in relational data, and a manual CHECK constraint will be harder to maintain and probably a lot less performing, as Oracle's cost based optimiser might not be able to use it for its query transformations. Better insert NULL into the foreign key column and possibly read it using any of these equivalent expressions:

NVL(B.ID, 0)
DECODE(B.ID, NULL, 0, B.ID)
CASE B.ID WHEN NULL THEN 0 ELSE B.ID END
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Strange, but I got this error: ORA-02091: transaction rolled back ORA-02291: integrity constraint (ENWIKI.REVISION_FK2) violated - parent key not found in ... –  Dennis Yurichev Apr 15 '11 at 9:10
    
That means you're inserting a value in B.ID, which does not (yet?) exist in A.ID. On the other hand, you might have an entirely different foreign key, that is causing the problem? –  Lukas Eder Apr 15 '11 at 9:12
    
See my update. Excuse me for wrong question! –  Dennis Yurichev Apr 15 '11 at 9:18
3  
I wouldn't recommend to do that. Better insert NULL into the foreign key column and possibly read it as such: NVL(B.ID, 0) = DECODE(B.ID, NULL, 0, B.ID) = CASE B.ID WHEN NULL THEN 0 ELSE B.ID END –  Lukas Eder Apr 15 '11 at 9:21
    
I agree with Lukas: do not use "magic" numbers for this kind of thing. –  a_horse_with_no_name Apr 15 '11 at 9:24
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You do not need a check constraint, if I understood correctly. Just a normal nullable column, with a foreign key that references A.ID. That way, accepted values are all values in A.ID, and NULL.

Updated answer, after the question was updated: if you cannot insert value 0 in A.ID, you cannot use a foreign key. But as others have said, this is not a recommended practice - better to insert the 0 value in A.ID and create the foreign key, or use NULL in place of 0 in table B.

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