Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
import static java.lang.System.out;  
import java.io.FileNotFoundException;
import java.io.PrintWriter;

public class ShadowingByImporting
{
    public static void main(String[] args)throws FileNotFoundException
    {
       out.println("Calling println() in java.lang.System.out");
       PrintWriter pw=new PrintWriter("log.txt");
       writeInfo(pw);
       pw.flush();
       pw.close();
     }

    public static void writeInfo(PrintWriter out)    
    {
      out.println("Calling pritnln() in the parameter out");
      System.out.println("Calling println() in java.lang.System.out Example");
    }  
}

The above program is given in Khalid Mugal's SCJP Guide,according to him by the principle of shadowing in static import the second println method in writeInfo. Method will execute twice, but when I run this following dissimilar output came.

Please somebody explain what's the actual concept.

Calling println() in java.lang.System.out

Calling println() in java.lang.System.out Example
share|improve this question
2  
DON'T WRITE LIKE THAT, PLEASE. –  dantuch Apr 15 '11 at 9:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This has nothing to do with static imports in general, but rather with the fact that the parameter out of writeInfo is hiding the outer definition of out which in this case happens to be a static import.

This hiding is also possible when you have

public class ShadowingByImporting
{
    PrintWriter out = ...;
    public static void main(String[] args)throws FileNotFoundException
    {
share|improve this answer

In function writeInfo, the out is a local variable, while System.out is fully-qualified, representing the standard output stream.

static import is generally used to import static public object into your scope, like System.out in this case. So you can use out directly without the fully qualified name ClassName.ObjectName, System.out in this case.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.