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I have four sensors (sen0-sen3). My sensors are returning 1 or 0 and im making an array of values using sprintf.then im trying to compare them with 0000 or 1000 and so on.

My Problem is even if the value of sen_array is 1000 , it never goes into the elseif condition (straight to else condition).

char sen_array[4]
sprintf(sen_array,"%d%d%d%d",sen0,sen1,sen2,sen3);
if(strcmp("0000",sen_array)==0)
{
    motor_pwm((156*(0.20).),(156*(0.20)));
}
else if(strcmp("1000",sen_array)==0)
{
    motor_pwm((156*(0.40)),(156*(0.40)));
}
else
{
    motor_pwm((156*(0.80)),(156*(0.80)));
}
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In sprintf(sen_array,"%d%d%d%d%d",sen0,sen1,sen2,sen3); you have 5 %d format specifiers and only 4 variables. –  Ryan Apr 15 '11 at 11:44
    
sorry that was paste error –  Khali Apr 15 '11 at 11:45
    
please show how you declare sen_array. –  Mat Apr 15 '11 at 11:46
    
sprintf()? strcmp? Is this really C++? Also are sen[0-3] always bool? –  Johnsyweb Apr 15 '11 at 11:50
    
1. If sen0-3 will be greater than 9 you will have memory over run –  W55tKQbuRu28Q4xv Apr 15 '11 at 11:52

4 Answers 4

What you're seeing is an artifact of memory corruption. The problem is that you've declared sen_array to be a char[4], which doesn't leave room for a terminating null. Change sen_array to:

char sen_array[5];
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@Downvoter : The tags were edited to C after I posted. Corrected now. –  ildjarn Apr 15 '11 at 11:57

Not using STL, I think the best way to compare integer arrays is using the memcmp function which compares blocks of memory.

int sen_array1[] = { 1, 2, 3, 4 } ;
int sen_array2[] = { 1, 2, 3, 4 } ;
if(memcmp(sen_array1, sen_array2, sizeof(int)*4) == 0) { /* do something */ }
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Your sen_array should be at least 5 chars long - to make room for a 0-terminator.

char sen_array[4];
sprintf(sen_array, "%d%d%d%d", 1, 2, 3, 4);

The above writes '1' '2' '3' '4' '\0' to sen_array - overflowing it and perhaps affecting a nearby variable

Use char sen_array[5];

A perhaps better solution would be to work with an integer:

int sa = sen0 * 1000 + sen1 * 100 + sen2 * 10 + sen3;

if (sa == 1000) {
  ...
} else if (sa == 1001) {
  ...
}
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sorry that was paste error –  Khali Apr 15 '11 at 11:45
2  
@Khali: sen_array needs to be 5 chars long, at least. –  Erik Apr 15 '11 at 11:48
    
@ Erik plz explain –  Khali Apr 15 '11 at 11:49
    
@Khali: sprintf 0-terminates - it'll write your four integers followed by a '\0' character - this overflows your current sen_array and can make anything happen. –  Erik Apr 15 '11 at 11:50
    
@Johnsyweb: In the OP it's stated that the sen variables have value 0 or 1. –  Erik Apr 15 '11 at 12:05

I think sen_array should be atleast 5 chars long and unless you are using the sen_array for something else, A better and faster way is to do

int res = 1000*sen0+100*sen1+10*sen2+sen3;

And use this to compare.

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