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int rows = 2;
int columns = 2;

positions = malloc(rows * sizeof(CGRect));

for(int i=0; i<rows; i++){
    positions[i] = malloc(columns * sizeof(CGRect));
}

positions[0][0] = CGRectMake(0, 0, 1, 1);
positions[0][1] = CGRectMake(1, 1, 2, 2);

positions[0] = {CGRectMake(0, 0, 1, 1), CGRectMake(0, 0, 1, 1)}; //error, how can we use array notation with the above
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4  
Is there a question associated with this? I'm not clear what you want. –  Jesus Ramos Apr 15 '11 at 13:00
    
What's the question? –  codebolt Apr 15 '11 at 13:00
    
//error, how can we use array notation with the above –  iPhone Developer Apr 15 '11 at 14:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted
positions[0] = {CGRectMake(0, 0, 1, 1), CGRectMake(0, 0, 1, 1)}; //error, how can we use array notation with the above

This doesn't work because you can only use curly bracket notation when initializing an array variable (not when it's already been initialized).

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Assuming positions is of type CGRect**,

you need

positions = malloc(rows * sizeof(CGRect*));

for(int i=0; i<rows; i++){
    positions[i] = malloc(columns * sizeof(CGRect));
}

Note that the outer malloc uses a pointer for sizeof

Edit: I misunderstood your question. As the other answer says you can't use the brackets notation with a dynamic array directly. You will need to create a seperate array and then copy it over, so it's probably better to use a different method, such as the one you used to initialize elements [0][0] and [0][1].

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sorry, i didn't my declaration up there, CGRect **positions; –  iPhone Developer Apr 15 '11 at 13:09

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