Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a node.js script that continuously requests a page, sort of like a cron job.

However, after a few minutes Node starts to use a lot of CPU (up to 70%) and memory (up to 200mb).

What is wrong with my script?

function cron(path)
{
    var http = require('http');
    var site = http.createClient(443, 'www.website.com', true);
    var request = site.request('GET', path, {'host': 'www.website.com'});
    request.end();

    request.on('response', function (response) {

        setTimeout(function(){cron(path)},15000);
    });


}

cron('/path/to/page');
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
request.on('response', function (response) {
    setTimeout(function(){cron(path)},15000);
});

For every response you create a new cron job. Log your responses. If your getting more then 1 from your request then your exponantially creating more cron jobs.

Your creating a function() {} with a reference to path. So the entire scope state is kept. you want to free memory by adding this:

var site = null;
var request = null;

Your calling require("http") inside a function rather then outside in module scope. You only need to get http once so place at the top of your file in module scope.

var http = require('http');
var site = http.createClient(443, 'www.website.com', true);
function cron(path)
{

    var request = site.request('GET', path, {'host': 'www.website.com'});
    request.end();

    var once = true;
    request.on('response', doIt);

    function doIt(response) {
        if (!once) {
            once = null;
            doIt = function() {};
            setTimeout(function(){cron(path)},15000);
        }
    });

    site = null;
    request = null;
}

cron('/path/to/page');
share|improve this answer
    
Great, I am testing the new script now. I don't see why you use the "once" variable inside the request.on() callback, every request can have only one response right? –  koen Apr 15 '11 at 13:26
    
@koen to make sure it only gets called once. Did you want to create a new cron job when you get a response or did you want to create a new cron job for every response you get from a request. Note that some of my "optimizations" may be done by the V8 interpreter for you. I don't know enough about V8 to see know when they release their memory, setting variables to null when there not needed is basically flagging that memory for cleaning by the GC. –  Raynos Apr 15 '11 at 13:28
    
I want to create a new response when the old request is finished. Sometimes the page takes longer to load and I only want one cron at the same time, that's why I use the request.on() callback. I just checked and the page returns only one response. –  koen Apr 15 '11 at 13:36
    
The script still has a major memory leak... –  koen Apr 15 '11 at 13:43
    
@koen then I have difficulty explaining the CPU usage. Place some console.log's in various places including timestamps (Date.now();) to see whether cron get's called more then once per 15 seconds. –  Raynos Apr 15 '11 at 13:44

In addition to the tips from @Raynos, here's another. I find that recursive calls like this in long running processes make me a bit nervous so I'd err on the side of using setInterval instead. I'd maybe split the cron and the http behaviour apart in case you want to try and re-use that logic, although that'll depend on your context:

e.g. in node 0.4.7:

var https = require('https');

function poll(path)
{
    https.get({
        host: 'www.website.com',
        port: 443,
        path: path
    }, function(res) {
        console.log("Got response: " + res.statusCode);
    }).on('error', function(e) {
        console.log("Got error: " + e.message);
    });

}

function cron(path)
{
    return setInterval(function(){
        poll(path);
    },15000);
}

var intervalId = cron('/path/to/page'); // keep in case you need to use clearInterval
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.