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Until BCL finally ships System.Numeric.BigInt, what do you guys use for arbitrary precision integers?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You could try mine on codeplex: BigInteger

Or here's another: codeproject

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F# has Microsoft.FSharp.Math.BigInt and Microsoft.FSharp.Math.BigNum.

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What's the difference, do you know? –  nawfal Dec 5 '12 at 17:43
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From the docs: "This type is provided for use only with the F# Core Library Versions that targets .NET Framework 2.0. If you are using .NET Framework 4, use the .NET Framework 4 type with the same name, BigInteger." –  Richard Dec 6 '12 at 8:17
    
Thanks, but I was asking what's the difference between FSharp.BigInt and BigNum. –  nawfal Dec 6 '12 at 9:47
    
@nawfal I think they're both obsolete, but for information: BigInt: integers, BigNum: rationals. –  Richard Dec 6 '12 at 10:07
    
Ok I get it. Should have been obvious for me from the name! :) –  nawfal Dec 6 '12 at 10:11

Also, the J# library includes a BigInt type.

Thankfully, all this will be sorted out when the BCL finally ships a standardized BigInt.

UPDATE 2012 System.Numberics.BigInteger is now included in the .NET framework.

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Have a look at

IronRuby.StandardLibrary.BigDecimal.BigDecimal

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Is it available as a simple DLL I can reference? (I'm coding in C# if that matters). –  ripper234 Feb 19 '09 at 23:56
    
It's MPL so you should be free to reuse the file –  Sam Saffron Feb 19 '09 at 23:58
    
I wasn't asking about the license terms, just about the ease of use. –  ripper234 Feb 20 '09 at 0:01
    
It looks like it would be fairly simple to extract this from iron ruby –  Sam Saffron Feb 20 '09 at 0:03

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